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Newsroom : Tiny and tinier: EU projects minimise size of semiconductor chips. Tiny and tinier: EU projects minimise size of semiconductor chips [Date: 2008-01-09] Two EU-funded projects have been pushing the limits of chip miniaturisation, trying to make complementary metal-oxide semiconductor chips (CMOS) even smaller than they already are.

Newsroom : Tiny and tinier: EU projects minimise size of semiconductor chips

While the NanoCMOS project, which was completed in 2006, helped develop 45 nanometre (nm) node semiconductors, its follow-up project PULLNANO is aiming at 32nm and ultimately 22nm features. 'The semiconductor industry is in the business of selling square millimetres of silicon,' states Gilles Thomas, the director of R&D cooperative programmes at French semiconductor manufacturer STMicroelectronics, coordinating partner of the two projects.

'So, by cramming more transistors into a chip you're delivering more capacity, more functionality and more computing power for the same price. Chips most commonly used in products today have features between 65 and 90nm in size, about 1,000 times smaller than the width of a human hair. Google Android. Embedded Newsletter for 07-25-11. Tech Focus: Hardware languages for softies A guide to VHDL for embedded software developers: Part 1 – Essential commands Using SystemC to build a system-on-chip platform The four Rs of efficient system design Compiling software to gates Editor's Note Every once in a while I find myself caught in the crossfire of debates between embedded systems developers about the pros and cons of C versus C++, C/C++ versus Java, or model-driven versus model-based software design frameworks.

Embedded Newsletter for 07-25-11

One area where such advice should also be heeded is where the dichotomy is the widest. This is ironic because, in an effort to make hardware design easier for both hardware and software designers, the industry has borrowed heavily from software languages. So when you get right down to it even the hardware is software and developers in both worlds face the same sets of challenges: writing the code, compiling, debugging, simulating and verifying it. Eetimes. Datasheets.com EBN.com EDN.com EETimes.com Embedded.com PlanetAnalog.com TechOnline.com Events ▼ UBM Tech UBM Tech ▼ datasheets.com EBN.com EDN.com EETimes.com Embedded.com PlanetAnalog.com TechOnline.com TMWorld.com To save this item to your list of favorite EE Times content so you can find it later in your Profile page, click the "Save It" button next to the item.

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Latest News Semiconductor News Blogs Message Boards Advanced Technology Analog Boards/Buses Electromechanical Embedded Tools FPGAs/PLDs Logic & Interfaces Memory Operating Systems Optoelectronics Passives Power Processors RF/Microwave Sensors & Transducers Test & Measurement EE Live! DesignCon ESC Brazil ARM Techcon ESC India EETimes University Tech Papers Courses Fundamentals Webinars Design West. 5 tech breakthroughs: Chip-level advances that may change computing.

September 13, 2011 06:00 AM ET Computerworld - Imagine a world with electronic devices that can power themselves, music players that hold a lifetime of songs, self-healing batteries, and chips that can change abilities on the fly.

5 tech breakthroughs: Chip-level advances that may change computing

Based on what's going on in America's research laboratories, these things are not only possible, but likely. "The next five years will be a very exciting time for electronics," says David Seiler, chief of the semiconductor electronics division at the Department of Commerce's National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Md.

"There will be lots of things that today seem like far-out fantasy but will start to be commonplace. " In this two-part series, we'll take you on a tour of what could be the future of electronics. Today's story focuses on chip-level advances, from processors that transmit data via lasers instead of wires to circuits made with new materials that leave conventional silicon ones in the dust. Eetimes. Datasheets.com EBN.com EDN.com EETimes.com Embedded.com PlanetAnalog.com TechOnline.com Events ▼ UBM Tech UBM Tech ▼ datasheets.com EBN.com EDN.com EETimes.com Embedded.com PlanetAnalog.com TechOnline.com TMWorld.com To save this item to your list of favorite EE Times content so you can find it later in your Profile page, click the "Save It" button next to the item.

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Latest News Semiconductor News Blogs Message Boards Advanced Technology Analog Boards/Buses Electromechanical. Eetimes. ARM tips 64-bit 'big-little' processor, partners. Modeling of embedded designs - Part 1: Why model? Paradigm Shift in Understanding of Biology Could Alter Electronics. The discovery that microbial nanowires inside the bacterium Geobacter sufurreducens can conduct electricity not only represents a paradigm shift in our fundamental understanding of biology but also could completely change how we manufacture and use electronics.

Paradigm Shift in Understanding of Biology Could Alter Electronics

Researchers at the University of Massachusetts, led by microbiologist Derek Lovley with physicists Mark Tuominen and Nikhil Malvankar, have discovered that the Geobacter bacterium uses the nanowire-like protein filaments to transfer electrons into iron oxide (rust) contained within the soil where they live, and that this mechanism serves the same function as oxygen does for humans. While the research, which was published in the August 7th advanced online edition of Nature Nanotechnology, represents the first time that metallic-like conduction of electrical charge has been observed in a protein filament, the researchers had conjectured as far back as 2005 that this was the case. Apple's A6 Details and Timeline Emerge.