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Force sensor in simulated skin and neural model mimic tactile sai afferent spiking response to ramp and hold stimuli. Force sensor in simulated skin and neural model mimic tactile sai afferent spiking response to ramp and hold stimuli The next generation of prosthetic limbs will restore sensory feedback to the nervous system by mimicking how skin mechanoreceptors, innervated by afferents, produce trains of action potentials in response to compressive stimuli.

Force sensor in simulated skin and neural model mimic tactile sai afferent spiking response to ramp and hold stimuli

Prior work has addressed building sensors within skin substitutes for robotics, modeling skin mechanics and neural dynamics of mechanotransduction, and predicting response timing of action potentials for vibration. The effort here is unique because it accounts for skin elasticity by measuring force within simulated skin, utilizes few free model parameters for parsimony, and separates parameter fitting and model validation.

Additionally, the ramp-and-hold, sustained stimuli used in this work capture the essential features of the everyday task of contacting and holding an object. Published on: 2012-07-24 News Provider: 7thSpace Interactive Comments. Brain wave-reading robot might help stroke patients. Can Billionaires Achieve Immortality by 2045? What's the Latest Development? Russian entrepreneur Dmitry Itskov is courting the world's richest individuals to help him in conquering death. Itskov, a 33 year-old, can afford to wait but the billionaires he approaches have an average age of 66, meaning they may be looking for shorter-term solutions to living longer—much longer.

"Itskov expects the first fruits in about a dozen years, when a human brain is to be transplanted into a robot body. The resulting 'avatar,' as he calls it, will 'save people whose body is completely worn out or irreversibly damaged.' " Called the 2045 Initiative, it recently held a meeting in Moscow and opened office space in San Francisco. What's the Big Idea? Paralysed woman drinks coffee with thought-guided robot arm.

Voicegrams transform brain activity into words. Electronic Tattoo-Like Devices Monitor Brain, Heart and Muscles. We might one day be able to monitor our bodies' internal functions — and prevent things like epileptic seizures before they happen — using a flexible circuit attached to the surface of skin.

Electronic Tattoo-Like Devices Monitor Brain, Heart and Muscles

The National Science Foundation announced Monday that researchers are working on a prototype tattoo-like device that can detect heart, muscle and brain activity. Tiny curly wires in a flexible membrane make up these devices and work better than conventional hard, brittle circuits, because body tissue itself is soft and pliable. Artificial Super-Skin Could Transform Phones, Robots and Artificial Limbs. Touch sensitivity on gadgets and robots is nothing new.

Artificial Super-Skin Could Transform Phones, Robots and Artificial Limbs

A few strategically placed sensors under a flexible, synthetic skin and you have pressure sensitivity. Add a capacitive, transparent screen to a device and you have touch sensitivity. Real-time Discovery Engine - YourVersion: Discover Your Version of the Web™ Real-time Discovery Engine - YourVersion: Discover Your Version of the Web™ Wearable robot puts paralysed legs through their paces.

This article was taken from the February 2012 issue of Wired magazine.

Wearable robot puts paralysed legs through their paces

Be the first to read Wired's articles in print before they're posted online, and get your hands on loads of additional content by subscribing online. This is the true integration of man and machine," says Eythor Bender, CEO of Ekso Bionics, a Californian research lab that has developed an intelligent "wearable robot". Bender and his team based the Ekso on a decade of bionics research by the US military. Its motorised leg braces let soldiers carry 90kg loads over long distances by anticipating the wearer's movement and transferring weight to the exoskeleton frame.

The same principles allow paraplegics to walk with motorised legs, by responding to gestures made above the waist. Connecting to the brain: Thinking about it. Virtual reality posts on CNET. CES: A laptop that follows your eyes - 1/13. Touch control, voice control, gesture control: alternative interfaces – or those that aren’t mice and keyboards – are all the rage at this year’s Consumer Electronics Show (CES).

CES: A laptop that follows your eyes - 1/13

With electronics gaining ever more computing power, it’s understandable that old inputs don’t necessarily apply to new gadgets. See also: CES 2012 – Consumer electronics in the spotlight And we can now add eye tracking to the list of interfaces that are showing future promise. Sweden’s Tobii Technology, for one, is at CES showing off its system on laptops running Windows 8. How it works is simple – the user looks at an application on screen and taps the computer’s touchpad to launch it.

Biggest Scientific Breakthroughs of 2011. Video: See how new wearable robot technology helps paralyzed patients walk. ROCKFORD, MI -- An athlete who was paralyzed in an accident was able to walk again Monday morning during a demonstration of Ekso, a wearable exoskeleton robot, at DMC Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan's Center for Spinal Cord Injury Recovery.

Video: See how new wearable robot technology helps paralyzed patients walk

The Ekso technology, named for its exoskeleton-like properties, was developed by California-based Ekso Bionics and aims to help those with lower extremity paralysis or weakness to stand and walk. The wearable bionic robot technology is a battery-powered, bionic device and uses motors to help users walk, said Beverly Millson with Missing Sock Public Relations. The robotic suit weighs about 45 pounds and can be strapped on within three minutes.

The patient does not bear the weight of the device as the load is transferred to the ground. Dream of making artificial body parts becoming a reality. It sounds like a sci-fi movie – doctors growing body parts to cure our ills.

Dream of making artificial body parts becoming a reality

But thanks to incredible breakthroughs, bionic repairs for humans are fast becoming a reality. Experts yesterday revealed they are perfecting “off the shelf” blood vessels, which could revolutionise treatment of heart attacks and strokes. If the Cambridge University blood vessel team is successful, patients could be spared major operations. The test tube vessels may also treat kidney dialysis patients and repair injuries.

And because the patient’s own skin cells are used, there is less chance of rejection. Professor Jeremy Pearson, of the British Heart Foundation, said: “This is very advanced. Here are other ways science is giving nature a helping hand...