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The Hidden College Problem: When Universities, Not Just Students, Take On Debt. How One Stupid Tweet Blew Up Justine Sacco’s Life. Photo As she made the long journey from New York to South Africa, to visit family during the holidays in 2013, Justine Sacco, 30 years old and the senior director of corporate communications at IAC, began tweeting acerbic little jokes about the indignities of travel.

How One Stupid Tweet Blew Up Justine Sacco’s Life

There was one about a fellow passenger on the flight from John F. Kennedy International Airport: “ ‘Weird German Dude: You’re in First Class. It’s 2014. Then, during her layover at Heathrow: “Chilly — cucumber sandwiches — bad teeth. And on Dec. 20, before the final leg of her trip to Cape Town: “Going to Africa. She chuckled to herself as she pressed send on this last one, then wandered around Heathrow’s international terminal for half an hour, sporadically checking her phone. Sacco boarded the plane. Then another text: “You need to call me immediately.” Sacco’s Twitter feed had become a horror show. A Twitter user did indeed go to the airport to tweet her arrival. In the early days of Twitter, I was a keen shamer. How To Get Started In UX Design -UX Mastery. We’ve received quite a few emails lately from readers looking to get started in UX Design—many coming from a print background (Psst: check out our ebook, Get Started in UX, for the most comprehensive guide to launching a career in user experience design ever written).

How To Get Started In UX Design -UX Mastery

Here’s one such email, which I’ve published here with permission: I’m a traditional print-based graphic designer looking to get into UX design. I’ve a good background in the Adobe Suite and traditional print software (QuarkXpress etc). Currently I’m working within the newspaper industry and am fearing for my future, as the industry is in (probably) terminal decline. I am looking to re-skill towards web-based UX design. To Remember a Lecture Better, Take Notes by Hand - Robinson Meyer. Students do worse on quizzes when they use keyboards in class.

To Remember a Lecture Better, Take Notes by Hand - Robinson Meyer

Psych 101 was about to start, and Pam Mueller had forgotten her laptop at home. This meant more than lost Facebook time. A psychology grad student at Princeton, Mueller was one of the class teaching assistants. How The American University was Killed, in Five Easy Steps. A few years back, Paul E.

How The American University was Killed, in Five Easy Steps

Lingenfelter began his report on the defunding of public education by saying, “In 1920 H.G. Wells wrote, ‘History is becoming more and more a race between education and catastrophe.’ I think he got it right. Nothing is more important to the future of the United States and the world than the breadth and effectiveness of education, especially of higher education. I say especially higher education, but not because pre- school, elementary, and secondary education are less important.

Student evaluations of college professors are biased and worthless. Photo by LuckyBusiness/Thinkstock It’s student evaluation time again—and I should be the last professor in the world to complain.

Student evaluations of college professors are biased and worthless.

With slight exceptions for “caring too much” and courses that meet “too early” (9:10 a.m.), my evaluations are quite good. And yet the student evaluations of teaching (SETs) I’ve received during my decade-long teaching career have meant absolutely nothing. This is because student evaluations are useless. Follow Ostensibly, SETs give us valuable feedback on our teaching effectiveness, factor importantly into our career trajectories, and provide accountability to the institution that employs us. Nathan Heller: Is College Moving Online? Gregory Nagy, a professor of classical Greek literature at Harvard, is a gentle academic of the sort who, asked about the future, will begin speaking of Homer and the battles of the distant past.

Nathan Heller: Is College Moving Online?

At seventy, he has owlish eyes, a flared Hungarian nose, and a tendency to gesture broadly with the flat palms of his hands. Minnesota State–Moorhead could cut 18 academic programs: Why do colleges cut academics first in a budget crunch? Photo by Dan Whobrey/iStock/Thinkstock Two universities, both alike in dignity and budget shortfalls, In fair America where we lay our scene.

Minnesota State–Moorhead could cut 18 academic programs: Why do colleges cut academics first in a budget crunch?

From not-so-ancient grudge against actually learning at college to new mutiny, Where drastic cuts make administrators’ hands unclean. If you’re planning to attend either Minnesota State University Moorhead or the University of the District of Columbia, best get in your Romeo and Juliet now—and while you’re at it, you should probably learn the formulas for velocity and momentum, and study up on the Spanish-American War. Because soon, these regional public universities may have no departments of English, physics, or history—nor a host of other programs often associated with “college,” including political science (MSUM), philosophy (MSUM), computer science (MSUM), and even economics (UDC). Debating an MFA? The Lowdown on Art School Risks and Returns. For aspiring artists, December is the cruelest month, when thoughts of pursuing an MFA must turn to action or be cast to?

Debating an MFA? The Lowdown on Art School Risks and Returns

In Defense of a Loaded Word.