Management

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The Law of Success. The Law of Success (originally The Law of Success in 16 Lessons) is the title of Napoleon Hill’s first book set, published initially in 1928 as a multi-volume correspondence course and later more compact formats in recent years.

The Law of Success

The work was originally commissioned at the request of Andrew Carnegie at the conclusion of a multi-day interview with Hill, and was based upon interviews of over 100 American millionaires across nearly 20 years, including such self-made industrial giants as Henry Ford, J. P. Morgan, John D. Rockefeller, Alexander Graham Bell, and Thomas Edison. Scientific management - a history and criticism - Google eBookstore. Shop management - Google eBookstore. The best business books ever: the ... Joseph M. Juran. Early life[edit] Juran was born in Brăila, Romania, one of the six children born to a Jewish couple, Jakob and Gitel Juran; they later lived in Gura Humorului.

Joseph M. Juran

He had three sisters: Rebecca (nicknamed Betty), Minerva, who earned a doctoral degree and had a career in education, and Charlotte. He had two brothers: Nathan H. Juran and Rudolph, known as Rudy. Rudy founded a municipal bond company[2] In 1912, he emigrated to America with his family, settling in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Diseconomy of scale. Causes[edit] Communication costs[edit] Ideally, all employees of a firm would have one-on-one communication with each other so they know exactly what the other workers are doing.

Diseconomy of scale

A firm with a single worker does not require any communication between employees. A firm with two workers requires one communication channel, directly between those two workers. Theory X and theory Y. Theory X and Theory Y are theories of human motivation created and developed by Douglas McGregor at the MIT Sloan School of Management in the 1960s that have been used in human resource management, organizational behavior, organizational communication and organizational development.

Theory X and theory Y

They describe two contrasting models of workforce motivation. Theory X and Theory Y have to do with the perceptions managers hold on their employees, not the way they generally behave. Peter Principle. The Peter Principle is a management theory which suggests that organizations risk filling management roles with people who are incompetent if they promote those who are performing well at their current role, rather than those who have proven abilities at the intended role.

Peter Principle

It is named after Laurence J. Peter who co-authored the 1969 humorous book The Peter Principle: Why Things Always Go Wrong with Raymond Hull. They suggest that people will tend to be promoted until they reach their "position of incompetence". Overview[edit] The Peter Principle is a special case of an ubiquitous observation: Anything that works will be used in progressively more challenging applications until it fails.

William Whyte's The Organization Man. Edgar Schein. Edgar Henry Schein (born March 5, 1928), a former professor at the MIT Sloan School of Management, has made a notable mark on the field of organizational development in many areas, including career development, group process consultation, and organizational culture.

Edgar Schein

He is the son of former University of Chicago professor Marcel Schein. Schein's organizational culture model[edit] Illustration of Schein's model of organizational culture Schein's model of organizational culture originated in the 1980s. Schein (2004) identifies three distinct levels in organizational cultures: Coercive persuasion. Mind control (also known as brainwashing, coercive persuasion, thought control, or thought reform) is an indoctrination process which results in "an impairment of autonomy, an inability to think independently, and a disruption of beliefs and affiliations.

Coercive persuasion

In this context, brainwashing refers to the involuntary reeducation of basic beliefs and values"[1] The term has been applied to any tactic, psychological or otherwise, which can be seen as subverting an individual's sense of control over their own thinking, behavior, emotions or decision making. Theories of brainwashing and of mind control were originally developed to explain how totalitarian regimes appeared to succeed systematically in indoctrinating prisoners of war through propaganda and torture techniques.

These theories were later expanded and modified by psychologists including Jean-Marie Abgrall and Margaret Singer to explain a wider range of phenomena, especially conversions to new religious movements (NRMs). Parkinson's Law. Parkinson's law is the adage which states that "work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion".

Parkinson's Law

History[edit] Start-up workshop presentation that mentions Parkinson's law First articulated by Cyril Northcote Parkinson as part of the first sentence of a humorous essay published in The Economist in 1955.[1][2] it was later reprinted together with other essays in the book Parkinson's Law: The Pursuit of Progress (London, John Murray, 1958). He derived the dictum from his extensive experience in the British Civil Service. W. Edwards Deming. William Edwards Deming (October 14, 1900 – December 20, 1993) was an American statistician, professor, author, lecturer, and consultant. Trained as a mathematical physicist, he helped develop the sampling techniques still used by the Department of the Census and the Bureau of Labor Statistics, championed the work of Dr. Walter Shewhart, including Statistical Process Control, Operational Definitions, and what he called The Shewhart Cycle[1] which evolved into "PDSA" (Plan-Do-Study-Act) in his book The New Economics for Industry, Government, Education.[2] as a response to the growing popularity of PDCA, which he viewed as tampering with the meaning of Dr.