Lesotho to harness wind and water in huge green energy project | World news Lesotho to harness wind and water in huge green energy project | World news The tiny mountain kingdom of Lesotho is to harness the power of wind and water in a $15bn (£9bn) green energy project, the biggest of its kind in Africa. The Lesotho highlands power project (LHPP) will generate 6,000 megawatts (MW) of wind power and 4,000MW of hydropower, equivalent to about 5% of neighbouring South Africa's electricity needs. Lesotho says the scheme will help end its plight as one of the world's poorest countries, "making it a case study in how investing in renewable energy can transform a nation's fortunes". Lesotho offers the opportunity to build one of the highest windfarms in the world, with more than 80% of its territory lying at least 1,800m above sea level. But the high altitude of its Maluti mountains also carries risks: one of the highest lightning strike rates in the world and temperatures plunging to -20C in the winter months.
Which Animal Best Represents Canada? (Survey) Which Animal Best Represents Canada? (Survey) TreeHugger The top ten posts of the week, from zero waste to jellyfish waste Also an ELF, an air conditioner and a very pretty drawing. Latest Stories from TreeHugger In the Guardian: 10 reasons to hop on your bike. In the Gold Coast Bullietin: The stupidest cycling article ever written April 12, 10:31 AM by Lloyd Alter in Bikes Two articles to make you smile; one for its sensibility and the other for its complete inanity The top ten posts of the week, from zero waste to jellyfish waste April 12, 8:10 AM by Lloyd Alter in Uncategorized Also an ELF, an air conditioner and a very pretty drawing. 7 ingredients for awesome train service (slideshow) April 11, 5:47 PM by Zachary Shahan in Public Transportation What makes a train service really awesome and desirable?
Mexican Primera Division side Jaguares have taken things to the next level in terms of attracting more followers to their club Twitter account by pasting their official handle on their club shirts. Not only is the club's Twitter account on the front of the shirt, but each individual player has their personal profiles instead of their names on the back of their shirts. We've seen plenty of players embracing social media, and Twitter in particular, but the teams they play for have not always been behind them with some banning it outright. In one way it's great to see a team pushing their own players accounts in this way, but you do wonder if it's a marketing stunt to get them mainstream media attention or a genuine attempt to help players connect with their fans. Football team in Mexico replace players names with Twitter handles Football team in Mexico replace players names with Twitter handles
Daily Pennsylvanian tweets bigger words than Hamlet Telegraph | Language Log Actor Ralph Fiennes complained recently that the English language “is being eroded” and blamed “a world of truncated sentences, soundbites and Twitter.” Et tu, Ralphie? In response, Mark Liberman — a linguistics professor at the University of Pennsylvania and one of the keepers of the Language Log blog — ran an analysis of noted works such as Shakespeare’a Hamlet, “a number of” Jeeves stories by P.G. Wodehouse and “the 100 most recent tweets from the Daily Pennsylvanian” student newspaper. “I figured that the DP ought to count as a good representative of the kids today who are responsible for the alleged word-shortening trend,” Liberman writes. The results, in mean word length: Daily Pennsylvanian tweets bigger words than Hamlet
Sept milliards de Terrien-ne-s: combien de gays et de lesbiennes? Sept milliards de Terrien-ne-s: combien de gays et de lesbiennes? L’Onu a décrété le 31 octobre 2011 jour du passage aux 7 milliards d’habitant-e-s sur la Terre. Les homos, combien de divisions? Difficile de répondre précisément à cette question quand dans plus du tiers des pays de la planète, l’homosexualité est toujours pénalisée et qu’il est souvent impossible pour les gays et les lesbiennes de vivre tout simplement au grand jour. Les plus optimistes tablent souvent sur une population homosexuelle adulte de 10%.