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What Motivates A Student’s Interest in Reading and Writing. The excerpt below is from the book “Building a Community of Self-Motivated Learners: Strategies to Help Students Thrive in School and Beyond,” by Larry Ferlazzo.

What Motivates A Student’s Interest in Reading and Writing

This excerpt is from the chapter entitled “I Still Want to Know: How Can You Get Students More Interested in Reading and Writing?” Let’s begin with a review of those essential qualities (needed to develop intrinsic motivation) in the context of reading and writing: ♦ Autonomy. A major Pew Research Center report (Lenhart et al., 2008) found that choice has an equally important role in teens feeling a desire to write (the story in Chapter 1 of my student who was energized by writing about football illustrates this point).

Likewise, in reading, extensive research documents that teachers encouraging students to read books of their choice for pleasure is a major contribution towards students developing a positive attitude towards reading and a life-long interest in it (Leisure Reading Task Force, 20014, p. 2). ♦ Competence. What Doesn't Work: Literacy Practices We Should Abandon. The number one concern that I hear from educators is lack of time, particularly lack of instructional time with students.

What Doesn't Work: Literacy Practices We Should Abandon

It's not surprising that we feel a press for time. Our expectations for students have increased dramatically, but our actual class time with students has not. Although we can't entirely solve the time problem, we can mitigate it by carefully analyzing our use of class time, looking for what Beth Brinkerhoff and Alysia Roehrig (2014) call "time wasters. " Consider the example of calendar time. In many U.S. early elementary classrooms, this practice eats up 15-20 minutes daily, often in a coveted early-morning slot when students are fresh and attentive. Yesterday was _______. English and Language Arts Apps, Games, and Websites. 20 Guiding Questions To Develop A Digital Literacy Plan - 20 Guiding Questions To Develop A Digital Literacy Plan by TeachThought Staff For professional development around developing literacy plans–digital or otherwise–contact us today.

20 Guiding Questions To Develop A Digital Literacy Plan -

Literacy is a chief concern for both academic and professional progress. Digital literacy is emerging as a genuine concern in education as technology competes with traditional texts for student attention. There have been recent revisions in academic standards, but these should be considered insufficient to address the rapidly changing literacy needs of students. So we’ve put together some questions to help design a plan to respond on your own–and to do so based on effective and accessible data and measurement of student performance.

Teaching literacy is more than teaching simple reading skills: it can’t be done in five easy steps. If we truly care about all Australian children and young people becoming literate I believe it is vital we understand and define the complexity of literacy.

Teaching literacy is more than teaching simple reading skills: it can’t be done in five easy steps

The conflation of different terms like reading instruction and literacy is not very useful. While reading is part of literacy, literacy is a much bigger concept which is continually changing due to the ever-increasing forms of literacy that are developing. Educators who specialise in literacy are currently working with the Australian Curriculum definition (Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority) which defines literacy as encompassing: For example, the Australian curriculum’s definition of literacy thus far exceeds the ‘key skills’ addressed in the recently launched FIVE from FIVE project proposed by the Centre for Independent Studies.

FIVE from FIVE is being touted, with much fanfare, as some all-encompassing way of teaching children to read. How To Use The Text Reduction Strategy To Improve Reading Comprehension - Engadine English Transition - Home. Integrating Technology and Literacy. When teaching with digital natives in a digital world, one question facing many educators revolves around integrating technology to help facilitate learning: How do you work technology into the pedagogy, instead of just using something cool?

Integrating Technology and Literacy

That task can be especially daunting in language arts literacy classrooms where reading and writing skill development is the crux of daily lessons. However, as 1:1 technology initiatives roll out, integrating technology into the classroom is our reality. With hundreds of sites, apps, Chrome extensions, and platforms available, choosing the right ones can seem overwhelming. As an eighth-grade language arts teacher, I've experienced this myself. Following are four tools that can help provide immediate formative assessment data as well as top-of-the-rotation feedback to help students develop personal learning goals. 1.

Registering is quick and free, whether via Google, Facebook, Twitter, Yahoo, or your own email account. 2. 3. 4. Visual Literacy. 01. © ALARM Introduction. 3 Strategies to Improve Student Writing Instantly. Editor's Note: A version of this post first appeared on Techie Teacher and Character Coach.

3 Strategies to Improve Student Writing Instantly

"But Miss Parrish, I can't think of anything to write! " Haven't we all heard similar lines in our classrooms? We see hesitant writers sit with a pencil in their hands and a paper on their desks, almost as if they have been handicapped by the task we asked them to do. How is it that some students have so much to say when talking out loud, but when a pencil is put into their hand they suddenly hesitate, struggle and have nothing to say? How can you help those hesitant writers eliminate the "handicap" or barrier that suddenly appears when asked to write? The answer is to simply have them produce "writing" without technically "writing" at all. Strategies That Work 1. Have your student stand up while you sit in his or her seat. 2.