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Twitter Sues Five Spamming Sites Twitter Sues Five Spamming Sites Twitter's had it with spammers and wants to send a message with the help of law enforcement. On Thursday, the company filed a suit against five separate web tools and providers that allegedly make it easier to spam people on Twitter. "Twitter now has more than 140 million active users, and we continue to grow at a record pace," Twitter said in a statement.
Biz Stone, a cofounder of Twitter, told an audience in Montreal this week that spending up to 12 hours a day on the platform is not necessarily a great idea. "To me, that sounds unhealthy," he said on Wednesday at the Board of Trade of Metropolitan Montreal business conference, according to a report in The Guardian. Stone told the audience that users should leave the site after they found the information they were looking for. "I like the kind of engagement where you go to the website and you leave because you've found what you are looking for or you found something very interesting and you learned something," Stone said, according to the report."I think that's a much healthier engagement. Obviously, we want you to come frequently." Twitter Co-Founder: Spending Too Much Time On the Site is 'Unhealthy' Twitter Co-Founder: Spending Too Much Time On the Site is 'Unhealthy'
Twitter needs to turn over the identiy of a user who made threats against Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., according to a federal judge's ruling that was released Thursday. The user was identified as Mr. Twitter Ordered To Turn Over I.D. Of User Who Threatened Bachmann Twitter Ordered To Turn Over I.D. Of User Who Threatened Bachmann
Twitter Turns Over User Information In Criminal Probe Of Occupy Boston
Twitter Is Selling Your Old Tweets [REPORT]
Twitter is the latest social network to turn a buck with content you created. The company sold two years worth of old tweets to Datasift, a marketing data firm. Datasift will make the tweets and other data, including the locations of where people were when they used Twitter, available to its clients. Datasift is the first of what is believed to be more than 1,000 companies on a waiting list to purchase the data. We've asked for Twitter to comment and will update as soon as we hear back. By now, most people know that social networks generally claim ownership of content and other data users post using their services. For Sale: Your Old Tweets For Sale: Your Old Tweets
Twitter Pulls Plug on @OscarsAudioGuy Spoof Account | Underwire Tweeting as a defensive Oscars sound tech, Barrett Tryon was apparently mistaken for a spambot by Twitter.Photo courtesy Barrett Tryon Editor’s note: This story has been updated to indicate that @OscarsAudioGuy is back online. The Twitter account @OscarsAudioGuy was suspended for several hours Monday, leaving its operator theorizing that some of Hollywood’s power players had complained about his satiric tweets regarding sound problems during the Academy Awards show. “I’m just going to add it to my resume that I was banned by the Academy,” said Barrett Tryon (@barretttryon) in a phone interview with Wired.com. In reality, the suspension resulted from the account being mistaken for a spambot, according to an e-mail from Twitter that Tryon forwarded to Wired.com. “Twitter has automated systems that find and remove multiple automated spam accounts in bulk,” a Twitter rep told Tryon in an e-mail. Twitter Pulls Plug on @OscarsAudioGuy Spoof Account | Underwire
Twitter Investors, Including Employees, Can Only Sell 20% of Their Stock [REPORT] Twitter Investors, Including Employees, Can Only Sell 20% of Their Stock [REPORT] In a move designed to forestall an IPO for as long as possible, Twitter has a rule barring any investor, including employees, from selling more than 20% of their stock, according to a report. Twitter initiated the rule about a year ago, but it hadn't been made public, according to CNNMoney. The guideline is somewhat controversial within the company and allegedly prompted Senior Technical Engineer Evan Weaver to resign last August. According to the article, Weaver's departure prompted an explanatory email to staffers from CEO Dick Costolo. The email outlined Twitter's reason behind the policy: To keep to the SEC-dictated limit of under 500 investors.
Twitter: Yes, We Keep Your iPhone Contacts Too Twitter has acknowledged the "Find Friends" feature on its iPhone app stores contact lists on its servers, echoing a recent controversy surrounding the Path iOS app. UPDATE: Wednesday afternoon, Apple issued a statement saying iOS apps accessing users’ contact lists will require explicit permission. After users opt to have the Twitter app search their phones, the company stores their address book's names, emails addresses and phone numbers on its servers for 18 months. Like many other iOS apps, Twitter allows users to have the app "scan your contacts for people you already know on Twitter." Until now, the storage aspect had not been explicitly stated in Twitter's privacy policy nor did the Find Friends function specify it would be transmitting and storing data. Twitter's policy stated that "Log Data" could include IP addresses, browser types, referring domains, pages visited, mobile carriers, device and application IDs, and search terms, among other activities. Twitter: Yes, We Keep Your iPhone Contacts Too
Twitter Admits Verifying @Wendi_Deng Was a Mistake
What Are Your Twitter Followers Worth, and Who Owns Them? A new lawsuit values a Twitter follower at $2.50 per month and argues that each one belongs not to the tweeter, but to their employer. The ramifications for employees who tweet and who leave their company are huge, says Brian Ries. It wasn’t too long ago when hastily departing employees were denied the chance to grab Rolodexes from atop their desks. What Are Your Twitter Followers Worth, and Who Owns Them?
Company Sues Former Employee for Value of 17,000 Twitter Followers [VIDEO]
Meet the Writer Being Sued For His 17,000 Twitter Followers At any conference, product launch or other event where the top tier of tech reporters gather, Noah Kravitz is easy to pick out of a crowd. He's the affable guy with glasses, earring and a cue-ball head; a supersmart cellphone-loving thirtysomething with a finely tuned sense of the absurd. Online, Kravitz often goes by the handle "Kravy Krav," an homage to hip-hop legend Flavor Flav. KravyKrav was also the name of his very first (and now inactive) Twitter account. Meet the Writer Being Sued For His 17,000 Twitter Followers
Time To Revise You Social Media Policy on Who Owns Your Followers Earlier this fall, a judge ruled that a lawsuit filed by PhoneDog.com against one of its long-departed employees, Noah Kravitz, has merit. According to Eric Goldman's Technology and Marketing Law Blog, the company is suing Kravitz over three points, including trade secrets and misappropriation of the account. The ruling, reported by Goldman and the New York Times, states that Kravitz is liable for several hundred thousand dollars in damages, calculated at $2.50 per month per Twitter follower. Time To Revise You Social Media Policy on Who Owns Your Followers
Lawsuit Over Twitter Followers May Not Set Precedent For Similar Cases The outcome of a lawsuit in which a company is suing a former employee over Twitter followers will most likely hinge on how the list was developed and what value each side places on the followers, according to legal experts. "This case is another example of the application of relatively old legal rules applied to new technology," said Bill Nolan, an attorney with Barnes & Thornburg LLP. "It's the 2011 version of the salesperson taking the Rolodex when he/she leaves the company." PhoneDog cleared the first hurdle in the lawsuit earlier last month when a court rejected Noah Kravitz's request to dismiss the lawsuit. PhoneDog is seeking $340,000 from Kravitz, or about $2.50 for each Twitter user that started following the account @Phonedog_Noah while he was tweeting and writing for the online publication.
An Update on PhoneDog v. Kravitz, the Employee Twitter Account Case [Post by Venkat Balasubramani] PhoneDog v. Kravitz, No.
Twitter Ordered To Turn Over Data On WikiLeaks Backers Twitter will have to comply with a ruling by U.S. District Judge Liam O'Grady to turn over information collected in the accounts of three WikiLeaks backers. Icelandic parliament member Birgitta Jónsdóttir, computer security researcher Jacob Appelbaum and Dutch activist Rop Gonggrijp had filed a request blocking the subpoena while the case was considered by a federal appeals court. O'Grady denied the motion, saying their appeal had little chance of success based on existing U.S. case law. "Litigation of these issues has already denied the government lawful access to potential evidence for more than a year," O'Grady said in his ruling. "The public interest therefore weighs strongly against further delay."
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