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Make a DIY Electric Bike from Drill Batteries. How to recover Gold from Scrap Ceramic CPU - Part 1. Wood Gas Camp Stove. A Rocket Stove Made From a Five Gallon Metal Bucket. The principle behind a rocket stove is simple–rather than cooking on an open fire, you burn wood in an insulated chimney.

A Rocket Stove Made From a Five Gallon Metal Bucket

Rocket stoves are highly efficient and easy to make. They run on twigs, so you can avoid cutting down a whole tree just to cook dinner. We’ve had a rocket stove made out of brick in our backyard for several years. The post we wrote on it in 2007 is–oddly–the most frequently searched post on this site. I figured that since there was so much interest in the topic it would be good to offer one that didn’t require masonry work. Using a piece of 4″ vent pipe and a 90º elbow, I made the chimney. I traced the outline of the vent pipe on to the lid of the bucket and cut this hole out with a jig saw. Using the vent pipe as a guide again, I cut out a 4″ hole near the bottom of the bucket. I used one part clay (harvested from the yard) to six parts vermiculite as my insulation material. Rock Rocket Stove Is Held Together By Coat Hangers.

© Liz To Rocket stoves burn hot and clean, using very little wood or other combustibles. Build Your Own $20 Outdoor Cob Oven. (The following entry is all about making a cob oven, a lovely and inexpensive outdoor pizza oven.

Build Your Own $20 Outdoor Cob Oven

The construction details have been trimmed back a bit, but this article should still give you a full idea of necessary materials and the building process for making your own oven!) I must admit, I’m a bit of a breadhead. Few things are as exciting to me as freshly baked bread with a dab of butter, or hot and greasy scallion pancakes, or fluffy and airy naan, or a pizza fresh from the hearth of a wood-fired oven. (That last one trumps all the others.) I thrive on bread. Earlier in the year, the idea of baking in the outdoors in a wood fired oven became something of a romanticized (in every positive sense of the word) notion to me.

How to Build a Rain Barrel - Article. How to Make a Personal Fire Pit For Cheap! My name is Karen and I haven’t lit anything on fire in 5 months.

How to Make a Personal Fire Pit For Cheap!

I’m sure I deserve some sort of a chip or something for that. You see … I’m a bit of a pyromaniac. Technically I’m not a *real* pyromaniac I guess. I mean, I only light things on fire that should be lit on fire. Like kindling and hardwood and pretty much anything with Hello Kitty on it. We light fires in the fireplace every night here in old Casa de Karen from October until March. 6 face cords every year go flying up that chimney. So what’s a pretend pyromaniac girl like me to do in September?

The Answer … The Personal Fire Pit. Here we gooooooo … Materials you Need cheap glass frames – $4 small rocks – $2 any kind of metal mesh – $2 any metal planter with a lip (edge) on it – $8 (on sale) How to build a Cold Room and Canning Room Walk-In Vegetable Bins Plans. How to Sharpen Tools: The Family Handyman. Sharpening your tools Years ago, I drove by a storefront with a hand-painted plywood sign.

How to Sharpen Tools: The Family Handyman

It read “Tool Sharpening.” Curious, I gathered a boxful of dull old handsaws and circular saw blades in my garage and carried them up to the store with the hope of getting them sharpened. Home made dish soap. I got this recipe from : www.frugalhomeliving.blogspot.com Homemade Liquid Dish Washing Soap 1 (7-oz) bar ZOTE or Octagon soap (or 1-2-3 brand soap) {Or cut a 14-oz bar in half} 5 qts. water 1 c. baking soda 1/4 c. washing soda 1/4 c. lemon juice Grate bar soap and place into a heavy stockpot.

home made dish soap

Pour in water & stir. Heat over medium heat, stirring often until soap is melted. Remove pot from heat and add in baking soda, washing soda & lemon juice. Stir to mix well. (As the mixture cools in the pot it may begin to gel up and separate itself from the water. To use: Use as you would any store bought detergent. Making soap: 5 tips for homemade soap. Until around 1916, making soap at home was commonplace.

Making soap: 5 tips for homemade soap

Using wood or plant ashes and leftover animal fats, families produced their own soap for cleaning their clothes and themselves. During World War I, when animal fats were in limited supply, German scientists developed synthetic detergents — and commercial soap was born. Homemade soap became less of a necessity, and gradually the practice dwindled. In recent years, back-to-the-landers and simple-living adherents have revived the homemade soap-making process — but it’s not only in favor with those who leave the big city for rural life or those with an anti-commercialist bent.

For anyone interested in living as self-sufficiently as possible, it makes good sense to make your own soap. Homemade soap is good for your wallet: you can make big batches of soap from scratch for less than it costs to buy bar after bar at your local drugstore, and you can reuse leftover bits to make new soap. DIY hand-milled soap. With the holiday season growing ever closer, your party-planning mom will love a handmade gift that doubles as a special treat for guests.

DIY hand-milled soap

Homemade soap is a beautiful — and environmentally friendly — alternative to the bar soap purchased at the drugstore or grocery store. But making soap is a fairly precise process that involves working with a caustic substance (lye), and if you’ve never done it before, it can be intimidating. Fear not — there is another way. Easy homemade soap.

As the last generations of Depression-era children or back-to-the-landers take their leave of this world, their DIY skills go with them.

Easy homemade soap

When we try to learn from scratch, we soon discover that recipes in books don't tell half the story. DIY soap making and other skills slipping away I have never figured out why this knowledge started slipping away from us, but I am trying to re-learn some of the basics. I now make my own soap, hand lotion, yogurt and bread. I am trying to figure out toothpaste, but it is hard to find good information about abrasion damage.

My soap recipe is customized to use full bottles of most of the oils, so you don't have a lot of inventory lying around, and you don't have to do a lot of measuring. Extensive List of Easy Home-made Household Products for Frugal Living. Make a Frugal Living By Making Your Own!

Extensive List of Easy Home-made Household Products for Frugal Living

This is my extensive list of simple and easy home-made household products recipes...with a seasoning of frugal living advice, and an occasional dash of scientific explaination. Besides being fun to make, these do-it-yourself recipes will help you save hundreds or thousands of dollars per year. These may improve your health too (a good example is the Homemade Deodorant Recipe below). Click here to jump down to the home made recipes index. Mixing up these recipes will also give you the satisfaction of becoming more self-sufficient - which is one of the corner stones of making a frugal living. You will find many of these simple home-made alternatives to be much safer and more effective than their store-bought toxic alternatives. You can choose a product category from the menu below or use the search box to find more recipes. Frugal Mad Scientist At Your Service I enjoy reverse engineering products to create cheaper and safer alternatives. How to Make Non-Toxic Hand Sanitizer.

Solar Powered Ovens for School Projects.