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Intelligence Theory

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Big Thinkers: Howard Gardner on Multiple Intelligences. Howard Gardner: We have schools because we hope that someday when children have left schools that they will still be able to use what it is that they've learned.

Big Thinkers: Howard Gardner on Multiple Intelligences

And there is now a massive amount of evidence from all realms of science that unless individuals take a very active role in what it is that they're studying, unless they learn to ask questions, to do things hands-on, to essentially recreate things in their own mind and then transform them as is needed, the ideas just disappear. The student may have a good grade on the exam. We may think that he or she is learning, but a year or two later there's nothing left. The idea of multiple intelligences comes out of psychology. Reframing the Mind. Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences (Basic Books, 1983) Multiple Intelligences: The Theory into Practice (Basic Books, 1993) Intelligence Reframed: Multiple Intelligences for the 21st Century (Basic Books, 1999) By Howard Gardner Checked by Daniel T.

Reframing the Mind

Willingham What would you think if your child came home from school and reported that the language-arts lesson of the day included using twigs and leaves to spell words? The Illusory Theory of Multiple Intelligences. A very attractive theory, but does it have any substance?

The Illusory Theory of Multiple Intelligences

MultipleIntelligenceMusic2.pdf. General Intelligence. What is it?

General Intelligence

The scientific idea of general intelligence, often called 'g', was initially introduced by Charles Spearman in 1904. According to Spearman, people have varying amount of general intelligence that are used in most cognitive tasks. Often overlooked, Spearman also proposed that there are specific intelligences that are used within particular areas that are not related to other cognitive tasks. For example, a specific intelligence may be a high verbal ability that helps a person articulate and share his or her thoughts. This verbal ability may not be related to that person’s ability to navigate through an unfamiliar city. Although it has been much maligned in recent years outside the research field and much more needs to be known, g remains relatively strongly supported by research findings. Why do we care? Intelligence test scores predict things like long-term performance in school, how much schooling one will receive, and what type of job one will get.

Article. The legendary Stanford psychologist helped hundreds of gifted children and showed America that it's okay to be smart.

Article

But behind his crusade was a disturbing social vision. To the Los Angeles juvenile authorities in 1923, Edward Dmytryk was an ordinary runaway trying to escape a vicious father who tore up his schoolbooks and clubbed him with a two-by-four. Mr. Dmytryk wanted his 14-year-old son back -- if only, as the caseworker suspected, because Edward brought home vital income.

While the authorities deliberated, a letter arrived from Professor Lewis Terman, the nation's most famous psychologist and the man who had planted the term "IQ" in America's vocabulary. Edward's high score on an IQ test had qualified him for Terman's pathbreaking Genetic Study of Genius. Though the more than 1,000 youngsters enrolled in his study didn't know it at the time, they were embarking on a lasting relationship. Thanks to Terman's timely letter, for example, Edward Dmytryk went to a good foster home. Big Thinkers: Howard Gardner on Multiple Intelligences. Howard Gardner: We have schools because we hope that someday when children have left schools that they will still be able to use what it is that they've learned.

Big Thinkers: Howard Gardner on Multiple Intelligences

And there is now a massive amount of evidence from all realms of science that unless individuals take a very active role in what it is that they're studying, unless they learn to ask questions, to do things hands-on, to essentially recreate things in their own mind and then transform them as is needed, the ideas just disappear. The student may have a good grade on the exam.

We may think that he or she is learning, but a year or two later there's nothing left. Microsoft Word - FAQ 3 20 13.docx - faq_march2013.pdf. Big Thinkers: Howard Gardner on Multiple Intelligences. The Illusory Theory of Multiple Intelligences. A very attractive theory, but does it have any substance? General intelligence versus multiple intelligences According to mainstream intelligence research, there exists a broad form of mental ability known as “general” intelligence that underlies a wide range of narrower, more specific abilities. IQ tests are intended to provide a measure of this broad general ability, as well as some of the specific ones. Howard Gardner objected to the idea of general intelligence, arguing instead that IQ tests actually measure distinctly narrow academic skills and denied that there is a single general ability that cuts across many different domains. Instead, he argued that there are separate domains of ability that deserve to be called “intelligences” in their own right, and that ability in one domain is unrelated to ability in other domains.

Sounds nice, but just how much support does the theory have? If no-one is smarter than anyone else, does that mean I'm as smart as this guy? Footnotes Image Credits.