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The Last Psychiatrist November 30, 2013 sorry old man, I have a dress fitting to go to Continue reading: "Hunger Games Catching Fire: Badass Body Count" ›› The Last Psychiatrist
Integration seems one of the great political issues of our era. That is, people express great concern about factional favoritism based on race, ethnicity, religion, class, gender, age, etc., and push for laws and policies to prevent it, or to encourage mixing and ties across factional boundaries. I’ve tended to assume that such policies have been sufficient, and perhaps even excessive. But a student, Randall McElroy, wrote a paper for my grad law & econ class, that got me thinking. He wrote about how the Hopi indians dealt with mass immigration in part by defining newcomers as a new clan, and then forbidding within-clan marriage. Overcoming Bias Overcoming Bias
Welcome to Less Wrong Welcome to Less Wrong A curatedcommunityblogA community discussion boardA source of edited rationality materials ... And a promoter of regular meetups around the world. Less Wrong is:
Sequences - Lesswrongwiki A sequence is a series of multiple posts on Less Wrong on the same topic, to coherently and fully explore a particular thesis. Reading the sequences is the most systematic way to approach the Less Wrong archives. If you'd like an abridged index of the sequences, try XiXiDu's guide, or Academian's guide targeted at people who already have a science background. Benito's Guide aims to systematically fill the reader in on the most important ideas discussed on LessWrong (not just in the sequences). It also begins with a series of videos, which are a friendly introduction, and useful if you enjoy talks and interviews. If you prefer books over blog posts, Thinking and Deciding by Jonathan Baron and Good and Real by Gary Drescher have been mentioned as books that overlap significantly with the sequences. Sequences - Lesswrongwiki
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Look, there's been a lot of controversy lately about what is and isn't "good philosophy" and what we can and can't say, and opinions on that are like assholes - everyone's got one, and no one knows what to do about Wittgenstein's. But I think we can all agree that a really worthwhile task is understanding the world around us, especially with science. But no one is really talking about how science is supposed to work - they're just going around saying "Oh, science! Philosophy Bro Philosophy Bro
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Edge : Conversations on the edge of human knowledge "Take a look. No matter who you are, you are bound to find something that will drive you crazy." —The New York Times, January 14, 2014 "A forum for the world's most brilliant minds."—The Guardian, January 12, 2014 White Peony 2014 by Katinka MatsonClick to Expand | www.katinkamatson.com Edge : Conversations on the edge of human knowledge
Brain Pickings Brain Pickings By: Maria Popova “Through our scopes, we see ourselves. Every new lens is also a new mirror.”
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Academic Earth believes everyone deserves access to a world-class education, which is why we continue to offer a comprehensive collection of free online college courses from the world's top universities. And now, we take learning outside the classroom with our original series of thought-provoking videos, designed to spark your intellectual curiosity and start a conversation. Watch, learn, share, debate. Free Online Classes | Online Learning | Academic Earth Free Online Classes | Online Learning | Academic Earth
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Just six corporations[1] own the vast majority of media outlets in the United States. Through years of relentless mergers, acquisitions and consolidations, a handful of corporations have been able to dominate most of what Americans read, see and hear on a daily basis. There is much debate on the legitimacy of the consolidation of media, with strong proponents[2][3][4] and opponents[5][6][7] bringing forth a wide variety of arguments.[8] Regardless of your position on the viability of the concentration of media ownership into fewer and fewer hands, it is an irrefutable fact that over the past few decades the corporations controlling the preponderance of American media have lessened considerably.[9] As of 2011, the largest media corporations in the United States in terms of revenue and profit are: General Electric[10], Walt Disney, News Corp., Time Warner, CBS and Viacom.[11] If Everyone Knew | Now with five more facts that everyone should know.