background preloader

Women in Charge

Facebook Twitter

This Woman Helps South Africa’s New Power Plant Reduce Emissions. South Africa's first black female winemaker goes solo. By Ilana Sharlin Stone – (Zester Daily) In a country in which wine making is still predominantly a white, largely male profession, South Africa’s first black woman winemaker, Ntsiki Biyela, is a pioneer: her latest achievement, the creation of her own brand, Aslina.

South Africa's first black female winemaker goes solo

Biyela is no novice to wine making, having brought accolades to red wine producer Stellekaya for the past 13 years. But forging her own self-funded venture and uplifting others is her ultimate prize. Unless you really know South Africa, it would be difficult to understand the remarkability of Biyela’s journey. She grew up in Mahlabathini, a small rural village in Kwazulu-Natal, about 800 miles from South Africa’s Western Cape Winelands. Biyela, who also worked as a cleaner after high school, had university dreams, feasible only with a scholarship.

“It was an opportunity to change my life,” she said. The odds were stacked against her, especially after her first sip of wine, which she thought tasted horrible. Ethiopia: First Lady - What Is Good for Women Is Good for the Economy. Photo: Amanda Lucidon/White House President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama greet His Excellency Hailemariam Desalegn, Prime Minister of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, and Ms.

Ethiopia: First Lady - What Is Good for Women Is Good for the Economy

Roman Tesfaye. Two entrepreneurs turn homemade beer into a successful business. South African female mechanic thriving in auto industry. S. Africa: Fruit farmer crowned DAFF Female Entrepreneur 2016. S.

S. Africa: Fruit farmer crowned DAFF Female Entrepreneur 2016

Africa: Fruit farmer crowned DAFF Female Entrepreneur 2016 The Deciduous Fruit Development Chamber of South Africa (DFDC-SA) congratulates Venecia Janse as the DAFF Female Entrepreneur 2016. The winners receive prize money which they are encouraged to use exclusively for the activities and production of their enterprises. The programme honored Venecia Janse from the farm Oudrif-Appelkloof in the Langkloof, Eastern Cape as the Overall Winner and she was also awarded as winner in the category Top Entrepreneur in the Sector: Export Markets. The competition is annually hosted by the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries in conjunction with TOTAL SA. South Africa’s first black female Ship Captains sail the ocean. South Africa’s purposeful drive to transform positively the country’s maritime sector primarily through development widely yet rapidly of a formidable base of human resource skills is yielding significant results.

South Africa’s first black female Ship Captains sail the ocean

Latest evidence of this trend is to be found in the successful qualification recently of the country’s first three black women as commercial cargo vessel Master Mariners or Ship Captains. The uniquely historical event occurred after Tshepo Motloutsi, Thembela Taboshe and Pretty Molefe received their colours as Master Mariners in March and April 2016 respectively following to their passing their exams. South Africa: Water and Sanitation Plans to Construct a Dam By Women-Owned Companies. Press release The Department of Water and Sanitation is planning for a multi-purpose dam to be built by a women-owned company, Minister Nomvula Mokonyane, said in Cape Town this morning.

South Africa: Water and Sanitation Plans to Construct a Dam By Women-Owned Companies

Addressing a pre-Budget Vote media briefing in Parliament, Mokonyane said as part of transforming the water sector industry her department would soon appoint a women-only company that will build the dam. "We will soon be able to speak of a dam developed by women; one that will be designed, constructed, operated and maintained by women and women owned companies and SMME's. These are the outcomes of transformation we expect to see realised and happening here in our country and during this term of office. " YouTube. South Africa's First Black Woman Naval Commander Calls The Shots.

CAPE TOWN: Zimasa Mabela grew up under apartheid in a South African village just two hours drive from the ocean, but she was 18 by the time she first saw the sea.

South Africa's First Black Woman Naval Commander Calls The Shots

Now, aged 38, she is the first black African woman to command a South African naval vessel. Lieutenant Commander Mabela's first visit to the beach coincided with the end of white rule in 1994 -- and she caught the historic wave of change that followed. "I wasn't terrified of the water," she told AFP, gazing out from the bridge of her sleek minehunter, the SAS Umhloti. "In my village there was a swimming pool at the church where us kids could swim. " But Mabela's desire for a life at sea came later, when she was at university studying for a Bachelor of Science degree in education. She attended a presentation by the navy and was captivated by the slogan: "Join the navy and see the world. " "I thought, where else would I get the opportunity to see the world? " More ambitions ahead "They have accepted me very well.

On Equal Footing

South Africa: Woman's Water Initiative Gets Overwhelming Response. By Wim Pretorius A Middelburg woman has started an initiative to get holiday travellers to take water to areas that have not seen much rain in recent times.

South Africa: Woman's Water Initiative Gets Overwhelming Response

Caroline van Saasen, a 46-year-old who works as a secretary at the Middelburg Chamber of Commerce, says she started the initiative on Sunday evening. "I just thought that if nobody starts, how will the problem ever get solved? " Van Saasen told News24. She created a Facebook group called Waternood Suid Afrika/Water shortage South Africa and within seven hours, word had spread and the group had grown to over 400 members from across the country. "I'm a member of the Boere in Nood Groep Facebook group and some people said that the water shortage has become so bad that some of their calves have died. So far she has organised eight people who have agreed to manage certain points where people are welcome to drop off water that will then be given to those desperately in need of it.