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5 Writing Tools To Meet Demands Of The Common Core. Editor’s Note: Teaching Channel has partnered with Student Achievement Partners on a blog series about digital literacy tools and their effective use by educators.

5 Writing Tools To Meet Demands Of The Common Core

The Common Core English Language Arts Standards for Writing focus on building college and career readiness by having students demonstrate the ability to write in a variety of formats. As educators, we need to facilitate authentic experiences for students to practice and take risks during the writing process. With that in mind, we’re going to discuss several valuable digital tools to help teachers create a more engaging and dynamic writing classroom for students to meet the rigorous demands of the Common Core. 1. Kaizena Kaizena is an amazing free tool that educators can use in conjunction with Google Docs to provide real time feedback with their own voice!

Providing written feedback can be a cold, impersonal process. Kaizena also provides teachers an opportunity to extend the school day. 2. 3. 4. 5. Continue The Conversation. 9 Great Speaking & Listening Tools For Students: Literacy in the Digital Age. Editor’s Note: Teaching Channel has partnered with Student Achievement Partners on a blog series about digital literacy tools and their effective use by educators.

9 Great Speaking & Listening Tools For Students: Literacy in the Digital Age

The majority of the tools mentioned in this post and the four earlier posts in our series, transform the student experience from passive consumers of information to active creators of content, employing multiple English Language Arts standards and skills along the way. We firmly believe this ought to be the new norm in the modern classroom. Kids have access to information; we must teach them how to navigate a world constantly evolving where content is at their fingertips.

The traditional application of ELA isn’t enough for future-ready learners. 5 Sites With High-Quality Informational Text. Editor’s Note: Teaching Channel has partnered with Student Achievement Partners on a blog series about digital literacy tools and their effective use by educators.

5 Sites With High-Quality Informational Text

One of the most exciting shifts in the Common Core State Standards is the increased use of content-rich, informational text. Let’s think about this. As professionals, how often do we read texts that are outside of our comfort zone? Perhaps it was a legal document, a lengthy contract, or 16th Century prose. A lot of time, no doubt, was spent trying to decode the language used. Preparing our students to be college- and career-ready is our priority. Below, we share five sites that will help you find these texts with ease and even differentiate the same article for the different learners in your room. The Impact of Digital Tools on Student Writing and How Writing is Taught in Schools. A survey of 2,462 Advanced Placement (AP) and National Writing Project (NWP) teachers finds that digital technologies are shaping student writing in myriad ways and have also become helpful tools for teaching writing to middle and high school students.

The Impact of Digital Tools on Student Writing and How Writing is Taught in Schools

These teachers see the internet and digital technologies such as social networking sites, cell phones and texting, generally facilitating teens’ personal expression and creativity, broadening the audience for their written material, and encouraging teens to write more often in more formats than may have been the case in prior generations. At the same time, they describe the unique challenges of teaching writing in the digital age, including the “creep” of informal style into formal writing assignments and the need to better educate students about issues such as plagiarism and fair use. Subtext & Tellagami - Two Apps to Attack Reading Comprehension. This is a guest post from Holly Clark at EdTechTeacher.org an advertiser on Free Technology for Teachers.

Subtext & Tellagami - Two Apps to Attack Reading Comprehension

Subtext and Tellagami are two amazing free apps that can expand the way you discover information about each student’s reading comprehension. By using their combined power, students can produce and publish valuable information about their reading comprehension to help their teachers better understand them as learners. First, begin with the Subtext App. Subtext is a collaborative reading app - also available a online at Subtext.com - that allows students to collaboratively read together. After you have downloaded the app, sign in using either a Gmail or Edmodo account. Digital Is. As the Visiting Fiction Writer-in-Residence at Fordham University I taught fiction writing to undergraduates and undergrads in courses titled Fiction Bootcamp and Writer's Workshop.

Digital Is

These courses were craft-based workshops where my students and I pondered the big questions of how fiction is constructed and what makes it work. We looked under the hood, took the back off the clock, peered into the innards in order to study the formal decisions necessary for effective story-telling. Our inquiry included point of entry; character and plot; creating meaningful scenes; interiority v/s external action; exposition; the management of time; the position of the narrator; linear v/s modular design; dialogue and its uses; conflict and resolution; image systems and so on. Prism. About the Online Digital Book, Flows of Reading. Digital Storytelling.

Storybird for Schools. Professional artwork jumpstarts student creativity, quickly drawing them into the writing process and scaffolding their progress.

Storybird for Schools

Simple tools keeps them on track; social feedback keeps them going. Onboard students with or without email, issue challenges, review and share work, and build a beautiful class library. All in a private setting that collects NO data from you or your students. Storybird is free for educators. In fact, we pay you. “Storybird can be used by all ages, for all different subjects... Shannon Miller K-12 District Teacher Librarian at Van Meter Community School. “Users can choose artwork from a specific artist and then add text to create a storybook...

Larry Ferlazzo Teacher, author, blogger. “I think I love Storybird just as much as my students enjoy using it. Erin Klein Blogger: Kleinspiration.com. “I can’t think of a better way to encourage literary exploration, artsy fun and new media skills to inspire a whole new flock of creative storytellers” Amy Jussel. Student Interactives. UDL Book Builder.