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Wisconsin flouting judge's orders, continuing to disenfranchise black voters. The state of Wisconsin is under a court order to provide credentials for people who don't have the extensive documentation the state is requiring to get an approved ID for voting.

Wisconsin flouting judge's orders, continuing to disenfranchise black voters

Ari Berman has discovered that it's not complying. Legal experts say they’re extremely troubled by the state’s continued failure to fairly enforce the voter-ID law. “Wisconsin has promised the court that voters would be able to get an ID with whatever documents they have,” says Sean Young of the ACLU. “They’ve completely failed to live up to that promise.” The state keeps frantically changing its procedures to mollify the courts, leading to even more confusion among voters. BREAKING: Three Republican Judges Restore Wisconsin’s Voter Suppression Law – ThinkProgress. Former GOP Staffer Admits Voter ID Law Meant to Hurt Democrats. The difficulties Wisconsin voters had with the state’s new voter ID law was intentional, according to Todd Allbaugh, former chief of staff to a Republican state senator.

Former GOP Staffer Admits Voter ID Law Meant to Hurt Democrats

The law, which took effect in November 2014, requires voters to present a photo ID at the polls. The kicker? The ID has to be issued by the state of Wisconsin, or be a passport, military ID, naturalization certificate, or be from a recognized Native American tribe, according to a website the state set up to inform voters. Confusion over the law resulted in long lines during Wisconsin’s presidential primary. MSNBC reported that approximately 300,000 people in Wisconsin don’t have an acceptable ID, and many voters had to wait for hours to get one before voting.

But Allbaugh says it goes much deeper than that. Besides wait times, the law also resulted in people not being able to vote at all. The ACLU and other groups are challenging the law’s strict requirements, and argued against it in federal court on Thursday. This week in the war on voting: 'Softening' voter-ID laws leaves obstacles; Garland on voting laws. • A look at Judge Merrick Garland on voting rights.

This week in the war on voting: 'Softening' voter-ID laws leaves obstacles; Garland on voting laws

At his blog, Richard Hasen analyzed how President Obama’s Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland might rule on a variety of issues. Garland has not decided many voting rights cases, Hasen wrote, but he did rule on an important one in 2012—Florida v. U.S. At issue in the case was whether Florida needed to “preclear” its cutbacks in early voting with federal authorities under the Voting Rights Act. (The preclearance provision was made moot by the U.S. Judge Garland sat on a three judge district court that issued a per curiam (unsigned) opinion, so we do not know if he was an author.

“There’s no question we are disappointed. . • Oregon’s “motor voter” law causing problems for political parties: The number of unaffiliated voters in Oregon has grown from 417,000 in 15 years ago to 540,000 now, 24 percent of the total registered. This week in the war on voting: Judge says NC voter ID required for primary; battles to watch. • Judges says North Carolina voter ID law in effect for March primary: U.S.

This week in the war on voting: Judge says NC voter ID required for primary; battles to watch

District Judge Thomas D. Schroeder turned down the North Carolina NAACP’s request for a preliminary injunction. He said the organization had not proved its claim that requiring a photo ID to cast a ballot would place an undue burden on blacks and Latinos. A trial date on the merits of the case will begin Jan. 25. The plaintiffs are given short odds that they will prevail at trial: The legal wrangling over the photo ID requirement started in 2013. Republicans under Pressure as Redistricting Ruled Unconstitutional in Florida and Challenged in Wisconsin.

Republicans took full advantage of their huge state legislative victories in 2010 when they got to redraw election maps after that year’s census.

Republicans under Pressure as Redistricting Ruled Unconstitutional in Florida and Challenged in Wisconsin

Several states now elect far more Republicans to office than their electorates’ political makeup would suggest. That may soon change in two states. A challenge of Florida’s map of congressional districts landed in that state’s Supreme Court, and eight of those districts were ordered (pdf) to be redrawn within 100 days. The ruling, on a 5-2 vote, is based on an initiative passed in 2010 by Florida voters that stated that “[n]o apportionment plan or district shall be drawn with the intent to favor or disfavor a political party or an incumbent.” Florida’s districts were found to have been drawn in secret by Republican legislators with help from GOP operatives.

“We had no idea of the nontransparent and shameful behavior of our legislators,” Pamela Goodman, president of the League of Women Voters of Florida, told The New York Times. -Steve Straehley. Voter Caging Is Back In Wisconsin. <a class="icopyright-article-tools-noscript" href=" target="_blank" title="Main menu of all reuse options"><img height="25" width="27" border="0" align="bottom" alt="[Reuse options]" src=" Click here for reuse options!

Voter Caging Is Back In Wisconsin

</a> Voter caging is a dirty little trick that the Republicans around the country have been using for over half a century to purge voters - mainly African Americans - from voting lists. Here's how it works: Voter caging is a practice of sending mass direct mailings to registered voters by non-forwardable mail, then compiling lists of voters, called “caging lists,” from the returned mail in order to formally challenge their right to vote on that basis alone.

Other methods, such as database matching, have been used more recently to compile voter caging lists. Wisconsin has not been spared from this crap.