background preloader

Water Shortage

Facebook Twitter

6 Places Where Nestlé Is Threatening Local Communities With Its Bottled Water Plans. Nestlé bottled waterPhoto Credit: Maximus/Flickr CC With much of North America still in the grips of a drought going back years, managing dwindling drinking water resources is a pressing topic.

6 Places Where Nestlé Is Threatening Local Communities With Its Bottled Water Plans

And in a year when bottled water sales in the United States are expected to exceed soda sales for the first time, Nestlé Waters—a water-for-profit poster child that dominates the bottled water industry, with multiple operations across the U.S. and Canada—is at the front lines of numerous battles being waged in local communities across North America. In recent years, a number of Nestlé’s plants have come under heightened scrutiny for all sorts of environmental and legal reasons, like the matter of where all the waste plastic ends up. Plastic bottles are one of the biggest sources of trash in national parks, and parks that have enacted bans have seen a significant reduction in their total waste stream. 1. 2. The legal wranglings are far from over, however. 3. 4. 5. 6. Nestlé CEO Exacerbating California's Drought Would Steal More Water If He Could. Most Americans would heartily agree that water, the most fundamental of human needs, belongs to all the people of a geographical region; particularly water stored deep underground in aquifers.

Nestlé CEO Exacerbating California's Drought Would Steal More Water If He Could

In California where an historic drought caused by anthropogenic climate change is in the fourth year of what experts claim is a condition that will last indefinitely, three highly profitable industries are taking the lion’s share of the very limited underground natural resource with no regard for the people or the devastating economic impact of their actions on the state’s taxpayers. One of the industries is crucial to the nation’s food supply and contributes to the state’s economy, but it is finally facing water restrictions to hopefully ameliorate the effects of the historic drought.

More Water Won't Solve The World's Water Crisis (VIDEO) The Chicago Council on Global Affairs' Michael Tiboris explains the challenges of addressing water scarcity around the world.

More Water Won't Solve The World's Water Crisis (VIDEO)

Less than 1 percent of the Earth's water is available for human use. That should be enough. No end in sight as repair work on California's sinking land costs billions. A canal that delivers vital water supplies from northern California to southern California is sinking in places.

No end in sight as repair work on California's sinking land costs billions

So are stretches of a riverbed undergoing historic restoration. On farms, well casings pop up like mushrooms as the ground around them drops. Four years of drought and heavy reliance on pumping of groundwater have made the land sink faster than ever up and down the Central Valley, requiring repairs to infrastructure that experts say are costing billions of dollars. This slow motion land subsidence – more than one foot a year in some places – is not expected to stop any time soon, experts say, nor will the expensive repairs. “It’s shocking how a huge area is affected, but how little you can tell with your eye,” said James Borchers, a hydrogeologist, who studies subsidence and says careful monitoring is necessary to detect and address sinking before it can do major damage to costly infrastructure such as bridges and pipelines.

NewsFocus. Our Water Is Being Stolen From Us!

NewsFocus

The Rich Are Buying Up The Rights For Our Water, To $ell It Back To UsNewsFocus - 120410 Unbeknown to most Americans, their most precious natural resource, as in life-giving drinking water, is being stolen, literally right out from under them. If they ever want a drink, they'll have to buy it back, at a considerable price. The New “Water Barons”: Wall Street Mega-Banks are Buying up the World’s Water. This article was first published on December 21, 2012 A disturbing trend in the water sector is accelerating worldwide.

The New “Water Barons”: Wall Street Mega-Banks are Buying up the World’s Water

The new “water barons” — the Wall Street banks and elitist multibillionaires — are buying up water all over the world at unprecedented pace. Familiar mega-banks and investing powerhouses such as Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan Chase, Citigroup, UBS, Deutsche Bank, Credit Suisse, Macquarie Bank, Barclays Bank, the Blackstone Group, Allianz, and HSBC Bank, among others, are consolidating their control over water. Wealthy tycoons such as T. Boone Pickens, former President George H.W. Billionaire T. It’s a strange New World Order in which multibillionaires and elitist banks can own aquifers and lakes, but ordinary citizens cannot even collect rainwater and snow runoff in their own backyards and private lands.

By sucking water from plants and the ground, climate change is deepening the California drought. Every time extreme weather hits, the question inevitably asked by the media is: Did climate change do that?

By sucking water from plants and the ground, climate change is deepening the California drought

The answer is that the atmosphere is a complex place, and many factors play into a weather event. Attributing a hurricane to climate change alone is like blaming your divorce on your distant and inattentive parents. The causes are likely more complicated. Take the California drought. It’s disappointing how many news outlets ask, “Did Climate Change Cause the California Drought?” If you ask a smarter question, though, you’ll get a smarter answer. Culture of ‘drought-shaming:’ Wealthy Californians complain rationing means brown golf courses. A conservative talk radio host in California says that people are not “equal” when it comes to water rights, and complains that water rationing policies mean he might have to play golf on courses with brown grass.

Culture of ‘drought-shaming:’ Wealthy Californians complain rationing means brown golf courses

California is facing one of its most extreme droughts in history. Governor Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency in January. Throughout California, citizens are reducing their water consumption in an effort to conserve one of humankind’s most precious resources. And a basic human right to which every person is guaranteed access under international law. California Water Shortage Culprits—Fracking and Agriculture—Escape State Conservation Measures.

California Governor Jerry Brown (D) announced mandatory water conservation measures last week but left out the two biggest water users in the drought-stricken state: farmers and frackers.

California Water Shortage Culprits—Fracking and Agriculture—Escape State Conservation Measures

Brown’s order to cut water consumption by 25% over 2013 levels applied only to residential users. Earth’s groundwater being drained at rapid rate: studies. Human populations are using up groundwater without knowing when it will run out, researchers said in findings that will appear in the journal Water Resources Research and were posted online Tuesday (AFP Photo/Frederic J.

Earth’s groundwater being drained at rapid rate: studies

Brown) Human activity is leading to the rapid draining of about one third of the planet’s largest underground water reserves and it is unclear how much fluid remains in them, two new studies have found. Consequently, huge sections of the population are using up groundwater without knowing when it will run out, researchers said in findings that will appear in the journal Water Resources Research and were posted online Tuesday. “Available physical and chemical measurements are simply insufficient,” University of California Irvine professor and principal investigator Jay Famiglietti said in a statement. Scientists used data from special NASA satellites to measure groundwater losses. In the first paper, they looked at 37 of Earth’s biggest aquifers between 2003 and 2013. Middle East Runs Out Of Water. By Daniel Pipes | 8 May 2015Middle East Forum A plane flies over the mountains in south of the Strait of Hormuz as the trading dhows and ships are docked on the Persian Gulf waters near the town of Khasab, in Oman.

(AP Photo / Kamran Jebreili) A ranking Iranian political figure, Issa Kalantari, recently warned that past mistakes leave Iran with water supplies so insufficient that up to 70 percent, or 55 million out of 78 million Iranians, would be forced to abandon their native country for parts unknown. Many facts buttress Kalantari’s apocalyptic prediction: Once lauded in poetry, Lake Urmia, the Middle East’s largest lake, has lost 95 percent of its water since 1996, going from 31 billion cubic meters to 1.5 billion.

What the Seine is to Paris, the Zayanderud was to Isfahan – except the latter went bone-dry in 2010. Farmers Using Oil Wastewater. By Natasha Geiling.