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Afghanistan. Horror Hospital: The Most Shocking Photos And Testimony From The Dawood Military Hospital Scandal. MOAB attack on Isis was a baffling choice in cold-blooded terms of cost. Afghanistan War: Out of Sight, out of Mind. Photo Credit: The U.S.

Afghanistan War: Out of Sight, out of Mind

Army / Flickr. Toxic Burn Pits. For years, U.S. government agencies have told the public, veterans and Congress that they couldn’t draw any connections between the so-called “burn pits” disposing of trash at the military’s biggest bases and veterans’ respiratory or cardiopulmonary problems.

Toxic Burn Pits

But a 2011 Army memo obtained by Danger Room flat-out stated that the burn pit at one of Afghanistan’s largest bases poses “long-term adverse health conditions” to troops breathing the air there. The unclassified memo (.jpg), dated April 15, 2011, stated that high concentrations of dust and burned waste present at Bagram Airfield for most of the war are likely to impact veterans’ health for the rest of their lives. “The long term health risk” from breathing in Bagram’s particulate-rich air include “reduced lung function or exacerbated chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, atherosclerosis, or other cardiopulmonary diseases.” Burn pits remain in use across Afghanistan. War’s toxic legacy: Iraq, the burn pits & the tragedy the military needs to be held accountable for.

From November 2003 to April 2009, in a lonely area of the Iraqi desert approximately twenty miles north of Baghdad, the United States operated a military base called Camp Taji.

War’s toxic legacy: Iraq, the burn pits & the tragedy the military needs to be held accountable for

The camp was located in what is known as the Sunni Triangle, which in the early days of the Iraq War was one of the most battle-torn areas in the country. In June 2004, Army Specialist Brian Thornhill was deployed to Camp Taji for a one-year tour of duty in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Brian was twenty-two years old when he left for Iraq. He was born and raised in the small town of Snyder, Texas. He came from a tight-knit Christian family. Brian was a good-looking young man; cheerful, friendly, and quick with jokes, but serious when he needed to be. Like so many other young men and women his age, the events of 9/11 affected him deeply. Brian enlisted on October 12, 2003, and was assigned to Fort Benning, Georgia, for basic training and infantry training school.

“They really don’t want this out”: The biggest Iraq War scandal that nobody’s talking about. The first 10 pages of “The Burn Pits: The Poisoning of America’s Soldiers” will rip your heart out.

“They really don’t want this out”: The biggest Iraq War scandal that nobody’s talking about

In the opening chapter of this new book, Joseph Hickman, a former U.S. Marine and Army sergeant, shares the brief and tragic life story of one Iraq War veteran. In a nutshell, a healthy young man shipped off to Iraq, was stationed at a U.S. military base where he was exposed to a constant stream of toxic smoke, returned home with horrible respiratory problems, was denied care by the VA, developed brain cancer and died. US military burn pits built on chemical weapons facilities tied to soldiers' illness. In 2007, shortly after vice-president Joe Biden learned that his eldest son would be deployed to Iraq, the then-presidential hopeful turned to a modest crowd at the Iowa state fair and admitted that he didn’t want Beau to go.

US military burn pits built on chemical weapons facilities tied to soldiers' illness

“But I tell you what,” he said, his family lined up behind him. “I don’t want my grandson or my granddaughters going back in 15 years and so how we leave makes a big difference.” Beau arrived in Iraq the following year, and spent the next several months serving as a Jag officer at Camp Victory, just outside of the Baghdad airport, and Joint Base Balad, nearly 40 miles north of Baghdad. Civilian Victims of United States' Aerial Bombing of Afghanistan. A Dossier on Civilian Victims of United States' Aerial Bombing of Afghanistan: A Comprehensive Accounting [revised] "What causes the documented high level of civilian casualties -- 3,000 - 3,400 [October 7, 2001 thru March 2002] civilian deaths -- in the U.S. air war upon Afghanistan? The explanation is the apparent willingness of U.S. military strategists to fire missiles into and drop bombs upon, heavily populated areas of Afghanistan.

" Professor Marc W. Herold Ph.D., M.B.A., B.Sc. How jingoism wasted the world: Why liberals finally need to admit that the Afghanistan invasion was wrong. In 2004, John Kerry neatly summarized what had come to pass for liberal anti-war sentiment: Bush “rushed the nation to war” in Iraq and “took his eye off the ball—off of Osama bin Laden.”

How jingoism wasted the world: Why liberals finally need to admit that the Afghanistan invasion was wrong

Kerry — who, in a high-point of craven pandering, saluted on stage at that year’s Democratic National Convention, announcing that he was “reporting for duty” — had voted for the Iraq war as well. But he was advancing the long-held conventional liberal wisdom, that Afghanistan was the good war, and Iraq the bad one. The Democrats were trying to walk a political tightrope between rising anti-Iraq War sentiment and persistent fears of terrorism, a political climate that seemed to demand a president of wartime stature. And so Kerry, the onetime winter soldier who during the Vietnam War asked Congress, “How do you ask a man to be the last man to die for a mistake,” was now a hard-nosed realist, wise to the fine balance between too much force and too little.

US military personnel face punishment over Afghan hospital strike. US military personnel involved in a devastating airstrike on a hospital run by Médecins Sans Frontières in Afghanistan have been or will be punished, officials have said.

US military personnel face punishment over Afghan hospital strike

The bombing last October of the MSF hospital in Kunduz – which came as Nato-backed Afghan forces clashed with insurgents for control of the northern provincial capital – left 42 people dead. Profiting off of chaos: How the U.S. privatized its war in Afghanistan — Antony Loewenstein on “Disaster Capitalism” “The corporation is now fundamentally more powerful than the nation-state,” writes journalist Antony Loewenstein in his new book “Disaster Capitalism: Making a Killing out of Catastrophe.”

Profiting off of chaos: How the U.S. privatized its war in Afghanistan — Antony Loewenstein on “Disaster Capitalism”

“Many ongoing crises seem to have been sustained by businesses to fuel industries in which they have a financial stake,” he explains. “Companies that entrench a crisis and then sell themselves as the only ones who can resolve it.” America is still paying for its wars: The enduring catastrophes of Iraq and Afghanistan. Let’s begin with the $12 billion in shrink-wrapped $100 bills, Iraqi oil money held in the U.S.

America is still paying for its wars: The enduring catastrophes of Iraq and Afghanistan

The Bush administration began flying it into Baghdad on C-130s soon after U.S. troops entered that city in April 2003. Essentially dumped into the void that had once been the Iraqi state, at least $1.2 to $1.6 billion of it was stolen and ended up years later in a mysterious bunker in Lebanon. And that’s just what happened as the starting gun went off. Doctors Without Borders bombing: can it be prosecuted as a war crime? The international president of Doctors Without Borders, also known as Médecins sans Frontières, has called a US attack on a hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan, that killed 12 staff and 10 patients on Saturday a “war crime” and “an attack on the Geneva conventions”.

Doctors Without Borders bombing: can it be prosecuted as a war crime?

On Wednesday, the director of the charity said the US military did not give prior notification of the airstrike, in an apparent violation of the Pentagon’s own instructions on the rules of war. But could the strike be prosecuted as a war crime? Horrific Hospital Bombing. The United States has been condemned for launching an airstrike on a Médecins Sans Frontières (Doctors Without Borders) hospital in Afghanistan that is believed to have killed up to 20 people. The hospital was hit during an aerial bombardment on Saturday morning in the besieged city of Kunduz, destroying a large portion of the facility. An MSF source told the Guardian that up to 20 Afghan members of staff and patients were killed and dozens more injured, adding that the death toll could rise further. U.S. Mistake. Stop Fighting? U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan walk away from a helicopter at Forward Operating Base Connelly in the eastern province of Nangarhar on Aug. 13.

The U.S. formally ended combat operations in Afghanistan at the end of last year. But nearly 10,000 American troops remain in the country and the U.S. frequently carries out air sorties. Fourteen American military personnel have died in Afghanistan this year. Wakil Kohsar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption itoggle caption Wakil Kohsar/AFP/Getty Images. U.S. Never Leaving. So you thought we were withdrawing from Afghanistan, eh? The President has announced it enough: once in 2011, once in 2012, and once in 2013. So if someone says something often enough, does that make it necessarily true?

Well, of course not, and certainly not in this case, because NBC News has the scoop: Malalai: Remove Troops. By Joe Scarry. Appalling Refugee Camps. By Alex Thomson. End Tragic Waste. End the Tragic Waste in Afghanistan Over the last week, I have had the opportunity to read two articles – "The Forgotten War" by Ann Jones and "Afghanistan War Must End Immediately" by Iraq veteran Jayel Aheram – that accurately describe the tragic waste of American lives and money in Afghanistan. Also this week, I had the opportunity to meet with Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction John Sopko and several additional members of Congress.

Wasted Blood & Treasure. 2nd Longest War. War For Minerals. Originally published on GR in June 2010. $500 Million Just In Planes. Military Gear Sold As Scrap. The armored trucks, televisions, ice cream scoops and nearly everything else shipped here for America’s war against the Taliban are now part of the world’s biggest garage sale. Every week, as the U.S. troop drawdown accelerates, the United States is selling 12 million to 14 million pounds of its equipment on the Afghan market.

Returning that gear to the United States from a landlocked country halfway around the world would be prohibitively expensive, according to U.S. officials. Instead, they’re leaving behind $7 billion worth of supplies, a would-be boon to the fragile Afghan economy. But there’s one catch: The equipment is being destroyed before it’s offered to the Afghan people — to ensure that treadmills, air-conditioning units and other rudimentary appliances aren’t used to make roadside bombs.

“Many non-military items have timing equipment or other components in them that can pose a threat. That policy has produced more scrap metal than Afghanistan has ever seen. Dawood Hospital Scandal. A Disaster. Photo Credit: Oleg Zabielin/Shutterstock.com Worth Fighting For is primarily the story of Rory Fanning's walk across the United States, from Atlantic to Pacific, to raise money for the Pat Tillman Foundation.

But in this excerpt, Fanning describes a different journey: from idealistic recruit who signed up for the US military thinking he could defend his country, to conscientious objector. This excerpt was edited and condensed by Truthout.