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Lateral Thinking

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Parallel thinking. Parallel thinking is a term coined and implemented by Edward de Bono.[1][2] Parallel thinking is described as a constructive alternative to "adversarial thinking", debate and in general the approach the GG3 (Greek gang of three) has been known to advocate.[3] In general parallel thinking is a further development of the well known lateral thinking processes, focusing even more on explorations—looking for what can be rather than for what is.

Parallel thinking

Definition[edit] Parallel thinking is defined as a thinking process where focus is split in specific directions. When done in a group it effectively avoids the consequences of the adversarial approach (as used in courts). CoRT Thinking Online - The Authorised Source for CoRT. Teach Thinking Today. Parallel thinking. Po (lateral thinking)

A "po" is an idea which moves thinking forward to a new place from where new ideas or solutions may be found.

Po (lateral thinking)

The term was created by Edward de Bono as part of a lateral thinking technique to suggest forward movement, that is, making a statement and seeing where it leads to. It is an extraction from words such as hypothesis, suppose, possible and poetry, all of which indicate forward movement and contain the syllable "po. " Po can be taken to refer to any of the following: provoking operation, provocative operation or provocation operation. Also, in ancient Polynesian and the Maori, the word "po" refers to the poporiginal chaotic state of formlessness, from which evolution occurred. Edward de Bono argues that this context as well applies to the term. For example, Sales are dropping off because our product is perceived as old fashioned. Some of the above ideas may be impractical, not sensible, not business-minded, not politically correct, or just plain daft. Edward de Bono. Oblique Strategies.

Origin and history[edit] The entire story of Oblique Strategies, with the content of all the cards, exhaustive history and commentary, is documented in a website widely acknowledged as the authoritative source, put together by musician and educator Gregory Alan Taylor.[4] The text of Schmidt's "The Thoughts Behind the Thoughts" was published by Mindmade Books in 2012.

Oblique Strategies

Design and use[edit] Each card contains a phrase or cryptic remark which can be used to break a deadlock or dilemma situation. Some are specific to music composition; others are more general. Use an old idea.State the problem in words as clearly as possible.Only one element of each kind.What would your closest friend do? From the introduction to the 2001 edition: These cards evolved from separate observations of the principles underlying what we were doing. Cultural impact[edit] Editions and variations[edit] Situation puzzle. Situation puzzles are often referred to as lateral thinking puzzles or "yes/no" puzzles.

Situation puzzle

Situation puzzles are usually played in a group, with one person hosting the puzzle and the others asking questions which can only be answered with a "yes" or "no" answer. Depending upon the settings and level of difficulty, other answers, hints or simple explanations of why the answer is yes or no, may be considered acceptable.

The puzzle is solved when one of the players is able to recite the narrative the host had in mind, in particular explaining whatever aspect of the initial scenario was puzzling. These puzzles are inexact and many puzzle statements have more than one possible fitting answer. The goal however is to find out the story as the host has it in mind. Example[edit] One situation puzzle would be: A man walks into a bar, and asks the bartender for a drink of water.

Thinking with Knowledge

Lateral thinking. Lateral thinking is solving problems through an indirect and creative approach, using reasoning that is not immediately obvious and involving ideas that may not be obtainable by using only traditional step-by-step logic.

Lateral thinking

The term was coined in 1967 by Edward de Bono. [1] According to de Bono, lateral thinking deliberately distances itself from standard perceptions of creativity as either "vertical" logic (the classic method for problem solving: working out the solution step-by-step from the given data) or "horizontal" imagination (having many ideas but being unconcerned with the detailed implementation of them).

Methods[edit] Critical thinking is primarily concerned with judging the true value of statements and seeking errors. Derailment (thought disorder) In psychiatry, derailment (also loosening of association, asyndesis, asyndetic thinking, knight's move thinking, or entgleisen) is a thought disorder characterized by discourse consisting of a sequence of unrelated or only remotely related ideas.

Derailment (thought disorder)

The frame of reference often changes from one sentence to the next.[1][2] In a mild manifestation, this thought disorder is characterized by slippage of ideas further and further from the point of a discussion. Some of the synonyms given above (loosening of association, asyndetic thinking) are used by some authors to refer just to a loss of goal: discourse that sets off on a particular idea, wanders off and never returns to it. "The next day when I'd be going out you know, I took control, like uh, I put bleach on my hair in California. "—given by Nancy C.