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The prevalence of pediatric metabolic syndrome—a critical look on the discrepancies between definitions and its clinical importance. The prevalence of MetS among children and adolescents—findings of current scientific review Table 2 provides an overview of 31 epidemiological studies that met the inclusion criteria.

The prevalence of pediatric metabolic syndrome—a critical look on the discrepancies between definitions and its clinical importance

The chosen publications included both large population-based studies as well as smaller surveys, which were conducted in schools or in certain country regions. Sample sizes reached from 371 students in a South African cohort [30] to a maximum of 37,504 adolescents participating in a nationwide study in Brazil [31]. Among the 31 included papers, the prevalence of pediatric MetS ranged from 0.3 to 26.4% (see Fig. 2). A 2 year physical activity and dietary intervention attenuates the increase in insulin resistance in a general population of children: the PANIC study. Study design and participants The Physical Activity and Nutrition in Children (PANIC) study is a non-randomised controlled trial on the effects of a combined physical activity and dietary intervention on cardiometabolic risk factors and other health outcomes in a population sample of children from the city of Kuopio, Finland [22, 23].

A 2 year physical activity and dietary intervention attenuates the increase in insulin resistance in a general population of children: the PANIC study

The Research Ethics Committee of the Hospital District of Northern Savo approved the study protocol in 2006 (Statement 69/2006). The parents or caregivers of the children gave their written informed consent, and the children provided their assent to participation. The PANIC study has been carried out in accordance with the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki as revised in 2008. We invited 736 children aged 6–9 years who started the first grade in 16 primary schools of the city of Kuopio in 2007–2009 to participate in the study (Fig. 1).

Paediatric obesity and brain functioning: The role of physical activity—A novel and important expert opinion of the European Childhood Obesity Group - Esteban‐Cornejo - 2020 - Pediatric Obesity. Corresponding Author E-mail address: david.thivel@uca.fr European Childhood Obesity Group, Brussels, Belgium Laboratory of the Metabolic Adaptations to Exercise under Physiological and Pathological Conditions, Clermont Auvergne University, Clermont‐Ferrand, France Auvergne Regional Center for Human Nutrition, Clermont‐Ferrand, France Correspondence Thivel David, Laboratory of the Metabolic Adaptations to Exercise under Physiological and Pathological Conditions (AME2P), Clermont University, EA 3533, F‐63171 Aubière cedex, Clermont‐Ferrand BP 80026, France.

Paediatric obesity and brain functioning: The role of physical activity—A novel and important expert opinion of the European Childhood Obesity Group - Esteban‐Cornejo - 2020 - Pediatric Obesity

Email: david.thivel@uca.fr Search for more papers by this author. Low‐carbohydrate interventions for adolescent obesity: Nutritional adequacy and guidance for clinical practice - Jebeile - 2020 - Clinical Obesity. Low‐carbohydrate dietary patterns are re‐emerging as a popular method of weight reduction.

Low‐carbohydrate interventions for adolescent obesity: Nutritional adequacy and guidance for clinical practice - Jebeile - 2020 - Clinical Obesity

However, their nutritional adequacy to meet the needs of growing adolescents should be considered. This study aimed to design theoretical low‐carbohydrate meal plans for clinical use in the management of adolescent obesity and assess nutritional adequacy. Meal plans were created for three levels of carbohydrate restriction (≤30, ≤50 and ≤120 g/day) without energy, protein or total fat restriction. Nutrient analysis was conducted using the FoodWorks Australia Ltd software (databases: AUSNUT 2013, AusBrands 2017, AusFoods 2017, NUTTAB 2010, New Zealand FOODfiles 2016), and compared with Australian Nutrient Reference Values for male and female adolescents aged 14 to 18 years. All low‐carbohydrate meal plans met the Recommended Dietary Intake, Adequate Intake or Estimated Average Requirements for most micronutrients at an energy intake of 6.3 to 7.2 MJ/day (1510‐1730 kcal/day).

The paediatric weight management office visit via telemedicine: pre‐ to post‐COVID‐19 pandemic - O'Hara - - Pediatric Obesity. The arrival of the COVID‐19 pandemic has significantly affected traditional healthcare delivery systems.

The paediatric weight management office visit via telemedicine: pre‐ to post‐COVID‐19 pandemic - O'Hara - - Pediatric Obesity

The need for social distancing along with the on‐going needs of our patients demanded that healthcare professionals create in‐person visit alternatives. The COVID‐19 pandemic has created an urgency to act, to use every tool in order to treat safely. Swift policy and regulatory changes such as reimbursed telemedicine visits directly to the patient's home have occurred at state and federal levels to provide access between patient and providers. Hospital systems and professional organizations are mobilizing teams to support telemedicine efforts, including virtual meetings, links to resources and rapid adaptation of policies and skills.

Government agencies, particularly the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), are reacting to the evolving emergency with telemedicine waivers and rule changes to allow continuity of care in provider practices.1 4.2 Private payors. School-based interventions. Caregiver Influences on Eating Behaviors in Young Children. Prevention of Childhood Obesity: A Position Paper of the Glo... : Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition. What is known?

Prevention of Childhood Obesity: A Position Paper of the Glo... : Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition

Childhood obesity prevalence markedly increased over the last four decades and induces a very high personal, societal and economic burden. Since effects of available obesity treatments are less than satisfactory, prevention is of high priority. What is new? Effective prevention of childhood obesity requires an integrated multicomponent approach addressing individual behaviour and diet, family habits, educational institutions, and societal standards.

Preventive effects are largest in early life, with marked risk reduction through improved infant and young child feeding. Childhood obesity induces very high personal, societal, and economic burden throughout the world. Unfortunately, our ability to effectively treat childhood obesity is less than satisfactory, and treatment tends to be costly (6–8). Infant feeding and early weight gain trajectories can markedly modulate long-term obesity risk (23,24). The home environment greatly influences young children. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Obesity Treatment Among Adolescents: A Review of Current Evidence and Future Directions. Importance Obesity in adolescence has reached epidemic proportions around the world, with the prevalence of severe obesity increasing at least 4-fold over the last 35 years.

Obesity Treatment Among Adolescents: A Review of Current Evidence and Future Directions

Most youths with obesity carry their excess adiposity into adulthood, which places them at increased risk for developing obesity-driven complications, such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and negatively affects social and emotional health. Given that adolescence is a unique transition period marked by significant physiologic and developmental changes, obesity-related complications can also negatively affect adolescent growth and developmental trajectories. Observations Provision of evidence-based treatment options that are tailored and appropriate for the adolescent population is paramount, yet complex. The multifactorial etiology of obesity along with the significant changes that occur during the adolescent period increasingly complicate the treatment approach for adolescent obesity.

חשיפה למסכים ובריאות הילדים. A developmental cascade perspective of paediatric obesity: A systematic review of preventive interventions from infancy through late adolescence - St. George - 2020 - Obesity Reviews. פעילות גופנית וספורט בילדים ובני נוער. Time to solve childhood obesity: CMO special report. Treatment of Adolescent Obesity in 2020. Treating the approximately 9 million US adolescents with obesity1 is challenging because of the complex nature of this chronic disease.

Treatment of Adolescent Obesity in 2020

Adolescence is a critical period for managing obesity, owing to the dynamic physiological and psychological changes inherent to this period of growth and development. To identify and diagnose obesity, body mass index (BMI) for age and sex percentile should be assessed and tracked (Table)2 and assessments for obesity causes, contributors, and complications should include a comprehensive weight, medical, surgical, social, and family history; medication review; physical examination; and laboratory tests.3,4. Global Atlas on Childhood Obesity. After agreeing at the World Health Assembly in 2013 that countries should ensure their levels of childhood obesity are no higher in 2025 than they were in 2010-2012, the latest analyses of trends in 196 countries found that 8 out of 10 countries (156) countries have less than a ten percent chance of meeting their target.

Global Atlas on Childhood Obesity

“The dramatic rise in the numbers of children affected by obesity is being driven by emerging economies – in Asia, the Middle East and Latin America,” said Dr Tim Lobstein, Director of Policy at the WOF and one of the authors of the World Obesity Federation’s report. “While North America, Europe, Australia and New Zealand are stabilising at high levels, the rest of the world is rapidly catching up, and in the case of some smaller countries heavily dependent on imported food supplies, now overtaking the levels seen in the West.”

What does the Atlas tell us? Action needs to be taken You can download the full report above. Interventions for preventing obesity in children. Guidelines on physical activity, sedentary behaviour and sleep for children under 5 years of age. WHO 2019: To grow up healthy, children need to sit less and play more. Children under five must spend less time sitting watching screens, or restrained in prams and seats, get better quality sleep and have more time for active play if they are to grow up healthy, according to new guidelines issued by the World Health Organization (WHO). “Achieving health for all means doing what is best for health right from the beginning of people’s lives,” says WHO Director-General Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus.

WHO guidelines on physical activity, sedentary behaviour and sleep for children under 5 years of age. Current Recommendations for Nutritional Management of Overweight and Obesity in Children and Adolescents: A Structured Framework. Pediatric Obesity Algorithm: A Practical Approach to Obesity Diagnosis and Management. Background Childhood obesity is a growing global health problem.

Pediatric Obesity Algorithm: A Practical Approach to Obesity Diagnosis and Management

Despite a continual rise in the rate of childhood obesity in the United States and other developed countries over the last 30 years, there is still no clear treatment strategy. A great deal of the research effort into solving the problem of childhood obesity is directed toward prevention. There are few evidence based studies specifically addressing the treatment of childhood obesity, thus the management and treatment of the child with obesity is left to the practitioner to use clinical judgment and persuasion to modify the family's dietary and lifestyle habits (1–3). Often, societal barriers pose roadblocks to early diagnosis and referral for treatment.