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XMPP. & The Real Time Web. & Semantic Web. While the MD5 hack that puts e-commerce sites at risk by faking security certificates received most of the attention at the 25C3 conference in Berlin today, another interesting talk about using XMPP to ensure privacy and security on social networks by Jan Torben Heuer caught our eyes as well. Heuer demoed a social bookmarking service named Diki, which implements some of his ideas, though in the long run, the developers are planning to take this prototype and develop a full-blown social network with a focus on privacy and encryption around this. Heuer argues that ensuring privacy on social networks is almost impossible, due to the centralized architecture of these networks, where all your information is controlled by one corporate entity, and where the user has to simply trust the service provider without having any control over what this provider does with the information.

Diki. In Superfeedr. Superfeedr provides a realtime API to any application who wants to produce (publishers) or consume (subscribers) data feeds without wasting resources and maintaining an expensive and changing infrastructure. This documentation shows how to integrate Superfeedr into a variety of diverse infrastructure, as well as highlights most of the features offered by Superfeedr. Table of Contents You can find links to the pages below in the top menu bar as well. Introduction: this pageSubscribers: your app consumes RSS feedsPublishers: your app publishes RSS feedsSchema: learn about the data sent by SuperfeedrMisc: extra features and information.

Audience It is expected that the reader has a strong knowledge of the web’s main protocols, as well as its design constraints. Playing in the open As we believe the web is a better ecosystem when open protocols are favored over proprietary APIs, we have decided to build on existing protocols and implementations. Support and Questions Contribution Definitions.

Superfeedr. Seesmic. In Google Wave. Google just opened the Google Wave developer sandbox for federation. Developers can now begin prototyping tools against WaveSandbox.com. Google tested earlier versions of Wave with a small number of developers on the Wave sandbox and this server will now become the platform for testing interoperability between different Wave servers. Google also released a how-to document that explains how to set up a Java-based Wave server over the weekend. More details about how to implement the Wave Federation Protocol can be found here. Running Wave on Your Own Server Developers who want to run their own Wave server can find all the necessary information for setting up a Wave Federation Prototype Server in these documents.

The Google Wave team points out that this is not even close to the final implementation of the Wave protocol and that things will inevitably change. As we pointed out last week, the federation protocol is an integral part of Google's plans for Wave. Google Wave. As we announced in August 2010, we are not continuing active development of Google Wave as a stand-alone product. Google Wave will be shut down in April 2012. This page details the implication of the turn down process for Google Wave. Stage 1: Google Wave is read-only -- January 31, 2012 In this stage, you will no longer be able to create or edit waves. Marking a wave as read will also not be saved.

Robots that try to write to a wave will stop functioning. During this time, you will continue to be able to export your waves using the existing PDF export feature. If you want to continue using Wave, there is an open source project called Walkaround that includes an experimental feature to import all your waves from Google. PubSubHubbub. What is it ? Real-time web protocol PubSubHubbub's co-creator Brett Slatkin, an engineer at Google, gave a talk at Facebook headquarters today about how the new information delivery system works and how Facebook can support it. He's published his deck on his blog and we've embedded it below as our Real-Time Web Article of the Day. If you're interested in making your content available in real time or more efficiently using real-time content syndicated from elsewhere, this presentation is a must-see. Each day leading up to the ReadWrite Real-Time Web Summit on October 15th we're highlighting one important article written by someone from outside our staff on the topic of the real-time web.

Slatkin's 61-slide deck makes a great introduction to both the technical and strategic aspects of the PubSubHubbub protocol. Slatkin starts out by explaining the value propositions of real-time data delivery, with an emphasis on social networking because he's speaking at Facebook. What is PubSubHubbub? Vs RSSCloud. Editor’s note: With all of the debate lately between RSSCloud versus PubSubHubbub, we wanted to hear from a developer who could actually tell us which one might be better and why.

The following guest post is written by Josh Fraser, the co-founder of EventVue, who is an active contributor to PubSubHubbub in his free time. He has contributed several client libraries for PubSubHubbub including a WordPress plugin. Guess which side of the debate he falls on. In the past few months, a lot of attention has been given to the rise of the real-time web. The problem is that the web wasn’t designed with real-time in mind. There is a huge need for the tech community to get behind new protocols that will power this fundamental shift in how web applications work.

Both PuSH and rssCloud address a fundamental flaw in the way web applications work today. Dave Winer deserves the credit for coming up with the idea long before anyone else. Conceptually, both protocols are very similar. In Superfeedr. Superfeedr provides a realtime API to any application who wants to produce (publishers) or consume (subscribers) data feeds without wasting resources and maintaining an expensive and changing infrastructure.

This documentation shows how to integrate Superfeedr into a variety of diverse infrastructure, as well as highlights most of the features offered by Superfeedr. Table of Contents You can find links to the pages below in the top menu bar as well. Introduction: this pageSubscribers: your app consumes RSS feedsPublishers: your app publishes RSS feedsSchema: learn about the data sent by SuperfeedrMisc: extra features and information. Audience It is expected that the reader has a strong knowledge of the web’s main protocols, as well as its design constraints. Playing in the open As we believe the web is a better ecosystem when open protocols are favored over proprietary APIs, we have decided to build on existing protocols and implementations.

Support and Questions Contribution Definitions. Superfeedr. In Typepad. Typepad, the SixApart-owned paid blogging service believed to be larger than any other online, announced this morning that every one of its blogs will now make updates available in real time. The service has implemented the Google-backed real-time protocol Pubsubhubbub, an Atom-centric alternative to the real-time protocol RSSCloud, which competitor WordPress turned on for millions of bloggers last week.

A fast-growing number of sites around the web are now flying the real-time banner, no longer requiring that news reading software poll them for updates several times an hour. With two of the largest blogging software providers now real-time, blogging could steal a little thunder back from immediacy-rich social networks like Facebook and Twitter. Josh Fraser, a Pubsubhubbub contributor, wrote a comparison of that protocol and RSSCloud on TechCrunch this weekend.

Fraser favors Pubsubhubbub but says that both are a big win for the real-time web. Typepad. In Netvibes. The next version of popular web dashboard service Netvibes will push "near real-time" updates from feeds to the browser, a dramatic change in how the service works. Those feeds will be served up along with the standard suite of functional widgets the company has always provided. As the number of real-time feeds available around the web has rapidly grown over recent months with the rise of real-time publishing technologies, the big question has been: when will a major feed reader consume these feeds? Google Reader may be too complex and too slow-moving to be first; that Netvibes is going to steal the show should be no surprise. In an unembargoed presentation sent to press this morning, Netvibes said that it would be adding support to its next version for both Pubsubhubbub and RSS Cloud protocols.

When those technologies are used to tell Netvibes that new items are available, the items will be pushed automatically to the browsers of subscribers - with no browser refresh required. Netvibes. In Google Reader. Google Reader is about to get much faster for developers. You'll be pleased to note that Reader has just adopted the PubSubHubbub protocol for shared items. This means that instead of repeatedly requesting that Reader's shared items reload from the server, the feed automatically updates via a distributed hub model. Rather than waiting on the back and forth pings of update notifications and polled Atom URLs, feed subscribers can receive both the notification and the message from a hub.

Subscribers get the latest content on their favorite feeds in near real time (sans repeated links), while publishers let the hub handle the subscription load. This distributed model allows publishers and subscribers to reduce the number of actions required to serve up feeds and is what Anil Dash eloquently describes as the Pushbutton Web. This latest Reader effort is a 20% Google project of Mihai Parparita, Brett Slatkin and Brad Fitzpatrick. Google Reader.

RSS cloud. In WordPress. All blogs on the WordPress.com platform and any WordPress.org blogs that opt-in (using this plug-in) will now make instant updates available to any RSS readers subscribed to a new feature called RSSCloud. There is currently only one RSS aggregator that supports RSSCloud, Dave Winer's brand-new reader River2. That will probably change very soon. Update: Within hours another RSS reader called LazyFeed has announced that it will support RSSCloud as well. RSSCloud is an element that's always been present in the RSS 2.0 spec but has drawn new attention with the rise of interest in the Real-Time Web.

The element was just added to the WordPress code this afternoon. The implications of this big vote of support go beyond reading WordPress blogs; this is the kind of traction that new technologies can leverage to gain support in many different applications. Google Reader, the dominant RSS aggregator on the market, began a limited implementation of a related protocol called PubSubHubbub last month. WordPress. In Netvibes. Netvibes.

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