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LEGO Creates Anti-LEGO Slippers To End 66 Years Of Horrible Pain. Finally, the moment that kid in you has been waiting for.

LEGO Creates Anti-LEGO Slippers To End 66 Years Of Horrible Pain

LEGO is releasing a brand new product, still in the testing stage. Anti-LEGO slippers. That’s right. No more horrifying pain as you walk through the living room, only to step on a stray piece of LEGO and feel as though you are dying from the shooting pain. LEGO Creates Anti-LEGO Slippers To End 66 Years Of Horrible Pain. 1977 blackout, NYC. A simple way how to tell if a battery is out of juice.

Pre-device world

1971: Nationwide looked at scientific toys. BBC Archive does not consider any of these contraptions a toy. Self-driving cars are all the rage these days. Driverless tractors existed before it was cool. Climate Change Will the Middle East Become. The dark web: What it is and how it works. We often hear about the dark web being linked to terrorist plots, drug deals, knife sales and child pornography, but beyond this it can be hard to fully understand how the dark web works and what it looks like.

The dark web: What it is and how it works

So just for a minute imagine that the whole internet is a forest – a vast expanse of luscious green as far as the eye can see. And in the forest are well worn paths – to get from A to B. Think of these paths as popular search engines – like Google – allowing you as the user the option to essentially see the wood from the trees and be connected. Nissan has been experimenting with self-organizing office chairs.

Automation is not the end of the world. Here’s why. What keeps you up at night?

Automation is not the end of the world. Here’s why

For many people worldwide, the answer is unemployment. Work is not just what allows us to sustain ourselves and our families: it expands our possibilities to be and do what we aspire to; it gives meaning and rhythm to our endeavours as part of a broader social contract. This is why in times of “polycrisis” and broader economic transformations, we dread losing what we hold so dear to a presumed automation apocalypse. What are people most worried about? Image: Global Advisor Note: Representative sample of adults aged 16-64. It is true: if a routine task can be performed cheaper, faster and better by a robot, there is a chance it will be. The future of work is about much more than automation. The future of work is about new ways to better preserve, share, spread and generate economic and social value.

In the 21st century, progress is about circling the economic and social square. Trends in Routine and Non-Routine Tasks in Occupations, United States Share. Vantablack is the blackest known substance. It absorbs up to 99.965% of visible light, hiding textures. Fun little video about the Bizarre Plan to Drain the Mediterranean: Atlantropa. Before the smart-phone, 1983. Dutch unveil giant outside vacuum cleaner to filter dirty air. Dutch inventors have unveiled what they called the world’s first giant outside air vacuum cleaner – a large purifying system intended to filter out toxic tiny particles from the atmosphere surrounding the machine.

Dutch unveil giant outside vacuum cleaner to filter dirty air

“It’s a large industrial filter about eight metres long, made of steel ... placed basically on top of buildings and it works like a big vacuum cleaner,” said Henk Boersen, a spokesman for the Envinity Group which unveiled the system in Amsterdam. The system is said to be able to suck in air from a 300-metre radius – and from up to seven kilometres (more than four miles) upwards.

It could treat some 800,000 cubic metres of air an hour, filtering out 100% of fine particles and 95% percent of ultra-fine particles, the company said, referring to tests carried out by the Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) on its prototype. Governments, businesses and airports were already interested in the project, Boersen said.

Pollution management

IT advances. Tech Fix - Agriculture. NASA-Patented Technology Purifies Vittori Lab's Greenery-Filled AirTrain. Even though trains are considered more eco-friendly than a pile of people driving their own cars, let’s face it – they aren’t exactly the freshest green places to hang out.

NASA-Patented Technology Purifies Vittori Lab's Greenery-Filled AirTrain

So Vittori Lab and a handful of other designers got together and designed the AirTrain, which uses NASA-patented technology to improve air quality using certain plants that absorb carbon dioxide emissions and release oxygen. Check out a video of the green train after the jump. Plants are natural carbon sponges, but the AirTrain’s greenery works more efficiently than ordinary plants. Fed in part by sunlight coming through the train’s transparent shell and watered by a clever rainwater harvesting system that “knows” when the plants need hydrating, these super plants also enhance the visual appeal of the train environment – both inside and out.

. + Vittori Lab Via Behance. Why the Internet of Things could change politics. The ‘internet of things’ will bring major changes in many areas of life, including the political arena.

Why the Internet of Things could change politics

What will be the new communication tools, strategies and narratives for policymakers? Japan tests out 'self-driving chairs' that take the pain out of queuing. Tokyo may be home to tens of thousands of great places to eat, yet many diners still have to wait patiently in line for a table at the most popular restaurants – until now.

Japan tests out 'self-driving chairs' that take the pain out of queuing

Nissan, the Japanese carmaker, has adapted its autonomous technology to develop “self-driving” chairs that not only enable weary diners to take the weight off their feet, but to zip to the front of the queue without moving a muscle. This MIT camera can read books. Even when they're closed. MIT/YouTube Books that are centuries old are often too delicate for museums to open, read, or explore without causing damage.

This MIT camera can read books. Even when they're closed

But a new camera developed by a team of MIT researchers can read these books without ever touching them. "I wanted to know how deeply you could read a closed book, because no one has ever tried that," researcher Barmark Heshmat said in a video published by the MIT Media Lab. A paper about the new camera was published in "Nature Communication" and notes that it uses terahertz radiation, which falls between the microwave and infrared spectrums.