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Why Engineers Can’t Stop Los Angeles' Enormous Methane Leak - Motherboard. One of the biggest environmental disasters in US history is happening right now, and you've probably never heard of it.

Why Engineers Can’t Stop Los Angeles' Enormous Methane Leak - Motherboard

An enormous amount of harmful methane gas is currently erupting from an energy facility in Aliso Canyon, California, at a startling rate of 110,000 pounds per hour. Gas Hydrate Breakdown Unlikely to Cause Massive Greenhouse Gas Release. Release Date: February 9, 2017 A recent interpretive review of scientific literature performed by the U.S.

Gas Hydrate Breakdown Unlikely to Cause Massive Greenhouse Gas Release

*****Permafrost degradation: In Siberia there is a huge crater and it is getting bigger. Near the Yana river basin, in a vast area of permafrost, there is a dramatic tadpole-shaped hole in the ground: the Batagaika crater.

*****Permafrost degradation: In Siberia there is a huge crater and it is getting bigger

The crater is also known as a "megaslump" and it is the largest of its kind: almost 0.6 miles (1km) long and 282ft (86m) deep. But these figures will soon change, because it is growing quickly. Mapping the world’s largest tropical peatland. When permafrost melts, what happens to all that stored carbon? The Arctic's frozen ground contains large stores of organic carbon that have been locked in the permafrost for thousands of years.

When permafrost melts, what happens to all that stored carbon?

As global temperatures rise, that permafrost is starting to melt, raising concerns about the impact on the climate as organic carbon becomes exposed. A new study is shedding light on what that could mean for the future by providing the first direct physical evidence of a massive release of carbon from permafrost during a warming spike at the end of the last ice age. The study, published this week in the journal Nature Communications, documents how Siberian soil once locked in permafrost was carried into the Arctic Ocean during that period at a rate about seven times higher than today. "We know the Arctic today is under threat because of growing climate warming, but we don't know to what extent permafrost will respond to this warming.

Living Planet: Saving Scotland′s peat bogs. New paper by @duarteoceans: Export from #Seagrass Meadows Contributes to Marine Carbon Sequestration #Bluecarbon. New research says it just might be possible:'Greater soil carbon stocks and faster turnover rates with increasing agricultural productivity' World's largest peatland with vast carbon-storage capacity found in Congo.

Scientists have discovered the world’s largest tropical peatland in the remote Congo swamps, estimated to store the equivalent of three year’s worth of the world’s total fossil fuel emissions.

World's largest peatland with vast carbon-storage capacity found in Congo

Researchers mapped the Cuvette Centrale peatlands in the central Congo basin and found they cover 145,500 sq km – an area larger than England. The swamps could lock in 30bn tonnes of carbon that was previously not known to exist, making the region one of the most carbon-rich ecosystems on Earth. The UK-Congolese research team, co-led by Prof Simon Lewis and Dr Greta Dargie, from the University of Leeds and University College London, first discovered the swamps five years ago. Their research, published in Nature on Wednesday, combined three year’s worth of peat analysis with satellite data to estimate that the Congo basin peatlands store the equivalent of nearly 30% of the world’s tropical peatland carbon. ***Space Laser Reveals Boom-and-Bust Cycle of Polar Ocean Plants. NASA recently kicked off NAAMES, a five-year study of what's happening at the bottom of the ocean food chain and how that will evolve as climate changes.

***Space Laser Reveals Boom-and-Bust Cycle of Polar Ocean Plants

NAAMES includes ocean, airborne and satellite components. This video features scenes from in and around St. John's, Newfoundland, which is where NASA's C-130H Hercules airborne laboratory began the first of what will ultimately be four field campaigns. ***Carbon measured with Lidar UCL: A walk through a laser-scanned forest. Water and Carbon in the Amazon Rainforest. For the past 6 years teaching geography A-level I've had to choose between ecosystems and plate tectonics so sadly I haven't taught much on tropical rainforests for quite a while (you can guess which of the two aforementioned topics is more popular!). So I was excited to see the Amazon rainforest as one of the core case studies in the textbook for this new OCR spec. I hope your enjoy the lesson and resources I've prepared (click on the link below to download).

For a topic with such a wealth of information available it sure took me a long time to decide what to put in! I haven't actually used it myself yet but I'm expecting it will take at least 2-3 lessons plus homework. It includes a GIS activity and consideration of exam questions (sample ones taken from the OCR website). Lastly I would like to thank Charlotte Springall for her help in creating this resource. If you would like to leave me a comment with some feedback it would be much appreciated! Scientists have long feared this ‘feedback’ to the climate system. Now they say it’s happening.

Giant icebergs play 'major role' in ocean carbon cycle. AS/A Geography. Carbon cycle. Excellent material and images on protecting the Amazon rainforest. Big win: Soil Organic Carbon: absorbing carbon back into the soil. *Carbon cycle (Iain Stewart): BBC Taster - Bitesize Masterclass No.2.