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Professional Learning

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New image: Learning Conversation @almaharris1 added to Flickr. Using%20Evidence%20in%20the%20Classroom%20for%20Professional%20Learning.pdf. Professional Learning: Making it Personal. Every profession requires training in order to learn how to be effective in the position.

Professional Learning: Making it Personal

In our profession of education, our training began with college. We received our degrees in a particular focus area. Once licensed, in order to stay current and keep our license we are required to complete a certain number of hours of professional development. Most of these hours are offered in the summer while teachers are "off" (yes, I am giggling at the thought of not working in the summer!) And can attend full day sessions on a particular topic. I have always been an avid reader and researcher. The following suggestions are a few ways I have personalized my own learning over the last year.

Connect with the Purpose of Building a Network Develop a personal learning network of people in your circle as well as others outside of your district, state, and even country. Reflect Reflective practice is certainly a best practice in our profession. Where do I see myself in 5 years? It’s no secret that most professional development for teachers is awful. Less well known is that some of it is great. (Sadeugra /iStock) It’s no secret that a lot of professional development given to teachers is worthless.

It’s no secret that most professional development for teachers is awful. Less well known is that some of it is great.

Teachers themselves have complained about it for years. U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan has repeatedly declared that PD is largely a waste of billions of dollars a year. A 2013 report by the National School Boards Association’s Center for Public Education noted that most teachers aren’t given the kind of professional development that would actually help them, and it called the most prevalent model of PD nothing short of “abysmal.” This is a particularly brilliant paper by @debsnet ... THIS is very important ... What do #teachers see when they look through the lens? Best Foot Forward Project Toolkit. Effective professional conversations - Helen Timperley. Adaptive expertise - Helen Timperley. Flipped Staff Meetings: Why Didn't We Do This A Long Time Ago? How–And Why–We Flipped Our Teacher Staff Meetings by Amy Arbogash Staff Meeting.

Flipped Staff Meetings: Why Didn't We Do This A Long Time Ago?

There are often no more dreaded words in a teacher’s vocabulary than those. The time we all get together to hear the principal talk about due dates, important initiatives, and the increasing workload on our plate. The place where teachers show up with papers to grade, emails to send, and conversations to catch up on.

So if staff meetings tend to be ineffective, boring, and repetitive, why do we continue to run them the way they have always been run? What if teachers could go to staff meetings and be actively collaborating? Our schools, and education in general, are being met with transformative times. Working as a technology integration specialist in a middle school that is going through a digital transformation required me and my administration to look differently at the time our staff spends together. The teaching method of flipping classes is not new to teachers.

Now I know what you are thinking. Wonderful graphic of the enablers of professional conversations from Helen Timperley #creatingapath@iroundsnsw. Adaptive expertise - Helen Timperley. One of Harvard's most popular stories from 2015: Coffee has proven health benefits. Teachers, discover classroom observation strategies that work. Choose one & implement in your school.

National School Reform Faculty. Dr. Dylan Wiliam - Leadership for Teacher Learning. Dr. Dylan Wiliam - Leadership for Teacher Learning. Great professional learning is school focused, school based & school led @AndrewRossed @PPALead @iroundsnsw. Flipped Staff Meetings: Why Didn't We Do This A Long Time Ago? Beyond four walls? Professional learning communities within and between schools - ACEL. Prof Alma Harris, Director of the Institute of Educational Leadership, University of Malaya, Dr Michelle Jones, Deputy Director of the Institute of Educational Leadership, University of Malaya We often hear the phrase ‘within these four walls’ used to infer that what is said should remain inside certain confines or well-defined fault lines.

Beyond four walls? Professional learning communities within and between schools - ACEL

When we think about school change and school improvement, the natural tendency is to think about the entity that is the school and to see improvement as largely residing within it. We are almost programmed to think that school improvement happens only within the organisation and is a function of certain interventions and innovations. This is certainly logical and sensible but how far is it really true? Turning to the research on organisational change, there is a wide range of evidence to suggest that building professional capacity or capital (Hargreaves and Fullan, 2012) is of paramount importance, if school improvement is the main aim.

Professional Conversations. ‘The formal and informal dialogue that occurs between education professionals including teachers, mentors, coaches and school leaders, which is focused on educational matters.’

Professional Conversations

What do teachers talk about professionally? Where do these conversations happen, when do they happen, and what are the conditions that are needed to make them more effective? Most importantly, what is the impact that they can have on developing teacher expertise and improving student outcomes?