White House to open source Data.gov as open government data platform As 2011 comes to an end, there are 28 international open data platforms in the open government community. By the end of 2012, code from new “Data.gov-in-a-box” may help many more countries to stand up their own platforms. A partnership between the United States and India on open government has borne fruit: progress on making the open data platform Data.gov open source. In a post this morning at the WhiteHouse.gov blog, federal CIO Steven VanRoekel (@StevenVDC) and federal CTO Aneesh Chopra (@AneeshChopra) explained more about how Data.gov is going global: As part of a joint effort by the United States and India to build an open government platform, the U.S. team has deposited open source code — an important benchmark in developing the Open Government Platform that will enable governments around the world to stand up their own open government data sites. White House to open source Data.gov as open government data platform
We can now host private demo installations to facilitate your evaluation process. These demo installations are created in randomly named directories. The purpose of these private demos is to give you a chance to experiment in your own space. You can enter a little data, show your minister and your treasurer how it works, without having to worry about someone changing the admin password or deleting half the menu options. Your demo space will be private but not particularly secure or permanent. Please don't put a lot of work into it as it will be deleted in about a week unless you ask for more time. ChurchInfo open source church database created with PHP & MySQL! - ChurchInfo open source church database created with PHP & MySQL! ChurchInfo open source church database created with PHP & MySQL! - ChurchInfo open source church database created with PHP & MySQL!
Open data : l’Europe veut concevoir son propre portail La Commission européenne vient de publier son appel d’offres officiel pour la création de son propre portail open data. Il devra héberger les données partagées publiquement par la Commission et, par extension, tous les corps et institutions européens. Pour l’emporter, les candidats devront aussi aider la Commission à définir et implémenter des procédures de publication, et intéresser les utilisateurs finaux dans l’exploitation de ces données. Open data : l’Europe veut concevoir son propre portail