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Research and Citation. If you are having trouble locating a specific resource please visit the search page or the Site Map. Conducting Research These OWL resources will help you conduct research using primary source methods, such as interviews and observations, and secondary source methods, such as books, journals, and the Internet. This area also includes materials on evaluating research sources. Using Research These OWL resources will help you use the research you have conducted in your documents. APA Style These OWL resources will help you learn how to use the American Psychological Association (APA) citation and format style.

MLA Style These OWL resources will help you learn how to use the Modern Language Association (MLA) citation and format style. Chicago Manual of Style This section contains information on the Chicago Manual of Style method of document formatting and citation. American Medical Association (AMA) Style. What Is Plagiarism? Please Don't Plagiarize! Show transcriptHide transcript Did you know that copying text from the Internet and posting it somewhere new without saying where you got it is a form of cheating? It's also called stealing. You also steal when you take an image that you find on the Internet and use it without permission. This kind of cheating and stealing is also known as plagiarism. Plagiarism is illegal and you can get in a lot of trouble for it. You can also get other people in trouble. And How To Avoid It - A Guide For ESL Learners Do you plagiarize? Plagiarism is an illegal form of copying. Examples of plagiarism Why do English learners copy?

Here are some common excuses English learners use: "I didn't know how to put it in my own words. "" There are two main reasons why plagiarism is taken so seriously in the academic world: Authors and artists work very hard to create original work. International Plagiarism Most countries have copyright laws. Reasons NOT to Plagiarize Copying from the Internet. Constructivism in learning. Constructivism is the label given to a set of theories about learning which fall somewhere between cognitive and humanistic views. If behaviourism treats the organism as a black box, cognitive theory recognises the importance of the mind in making sense of the material with which it is presented. Nevertheless, it still presupposes that the role of the learner is primarily to assimilate whatever the teacher presents. Constructivism — particularly in its "social" forms — suggests that the learner is much more actively involved in a joint enterprise with the teacher of creating ("constructing") new meanings.

We can distinguish between "cognitive constructivism" which is about how the individual learner understands things, in terms of developmental stages and learning styles, and "social constructivism", which emphasises how meanings and understandings grow out of social encounters—see Vygotsky below. In this sense, conversational theories of learning fit into the constructivist framework. IJILE final online. The 5 Elements Students Should Look For When Evaluating Web Content. March , 2014 In a section in her wonderful book "Understanding The Social Lives of Networked Teens" Danah Boyd talked extensively about the concept of digital natives and argued that this nomenclature does not really capture the essence of what a digitally savvy teenager really means.

Dana argued that the mere fact of being comfortable with a social media tool does not prove that the user has a digital fluency to allow them to better use it for educational purposes : Just because teens are comfortable using social media to hang out does not mean that they’re fluent in or with technology. Many teens are not nearly as digitally adept as the often-used assumption that they are “digital natives” would suggest. The teens I met knew how to get to Google but had little understanding about how to construct a query to get quality information from the popular search engine.

Learning how to evaluate online content is an essential step in the process of developing digitally literate students. Social Constructivist Theories. For a general intro to constructivism click: Overview of constructivism. Overview of Social Constructivism Another cognitive psychologist, Lev Vygotsky ( shared many of Piaget's ( assumptions about how children learn, but he placed more emphasis on the social context of learning. Piaget's cognitive theories have been used as the foundation for discovery learning ( models in which the teacher plays a limited role.

In Vygotsky's theories both teachers and older or more experienced children play very important roles in learning. There is a great deal of overlap between cognitive constructivism and Vygotsky's social constructivist theory. Although Vygotsky died at the age of 38 in 1934, most of his publications did not appear in English until after 1960. General Implications of Social Constructivism 1. Additional Information. Family/community engagement.

Trilingual_primary_education_def.pdf. Index. Writing in the Disciplines: English - The Process of Writing an English Research Paper. The Process of Writing An English Research Paper (printable version here) 1. Choosing an Area of Focus One of the most important steps in the process of writing a research paper for the English discipline is choosing an interesting, engaging topic. Your choice of topic will influence both the effort you invest in your research and the degree to which you enjoy the process. 2. Before beginning in-depth research, consult your instructor. 3. This is perhaps the most important step in the research paper writing process. In order to avoid later confusion, begin each section by recording the author's name, book or article title, and page numbers (if relevant). 4. After rereading your notes and reflecting on the topic, formulate a tentative one-sentence thesis.

An initial thesis should be tentative. 5. The primary purpose of an outline is to help the writer reflect on his or her research/interpretation and to create an organized (and tentative) vision of the research paper. 6. 7. Research Papers. Summary: This handout provides detailed information about how to write research papers including discussing research papers as a genre, choosing topics, and finding sources.

Contributors:Jack Raymond Baker, Allen BrizeeLast Edited: 2013-02-21 10:38:50 The research paper There will come a time in most students' careers when they are assigned a research paper. Such an assignment often creates a great deal of unneeded anxiety in the student, which may result in procrastination and a feeling of confusion and inadequacy. Becoming an experienced researcher and writer in any field or discipline takes a great deal of practice. This handout will include the following sections related to the process of writing a research paper: Genre- This section will provide an overview for understanding the difference between an analytical and argumentative research paper.

Constructivism in learning. Vygotsky Social Constructivism. Academic and Professional Writing: Writing a Research Paper. This page lists some of the stages involved in writing a library-based research paper. Although this list suggests that there is a simple, linear process to writing such a paper, the actual process of writing a research paper is often a messy and recursive one, so please use this outline as a flexible guide. Discovering, Narrowing, and Focusing a Researchable Topic Try to find a topic that truly interests you Try writing your way to a topic Talk with your course instructor and classmates about your topic Pose your topic as a question to be answered or a problem to be solved Finding, Selecting, and Reading Sources You will need to look at the following types of sources: library catalog, periodical indexes, bibliographies, suggestions from your instructor primary vs. secondary sources journals, books, other documents Grouping, Sequencing, and Documenting Information The following systems will help keep you organized: Writing an Outline and a Prospectus for Yourself What is the topic?

Trilingual_primary_education_def.pdf. 27 Attention-Getters For Quieting A Noisy Classroom. Bloom's Taxonomy. Education study finds in favour of traditional teaching styles. Schools need to put more effort into evaluating what makes effective teaching, and ensure that discredited practices are rooted out from classrooms, according to a new study published by the Sutton Trust and Durham University. The study suggests that some schools and teachers continue using methods that cause little or no improvement in student progress, and instead rely on anecdotal evidence to back fashionable techniques such as “discovery learning,” where pupils are meant to uncover key ideas for themselves, or “learning styles,” which claims children can be divided into those who learn best through sight, sound or movement.

Instead, more traditional styles that reward effort, use class time efficiently and insist on clear rules to manage pupil behaviour, are more likely to succeed, according to the report – touching on a raw nerve within the British teaching profession, which has seen vigorous debates between “progressive” and “traditional” best practice.