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Action Research: Homework

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Homework. Takeaway homework. Effective homework practices. Brief Effective Homework Assignments. Teaching and Learning Toolkit. Stanford research shows pitfalls of homework. Stanford Report, March 10, 2014 A Stanford researcher found that students in high-achieving communities who spend too much time on homework experience more stress, physical health problems, a lack of balance and even alienation from society.

Stanford research shows pitfalls of homework

More than two hours of homework a night may be counterproductive, according to the study. By Clifton B. Parker L.A. Education scholar Denise Pope has found that too much homework has negative effects on student well-being and behavioral engagement. A Stanford researcher found that too much homework can negatively affect kids, especially their lives away from school, where family, friends and activities matter. "Our findings on the effects of homework challenge the traditional assumption that homework is inherently good," wrote Denise Pope, a senior lecturer at the Stanford Graduate School of Education and a co-author of a study published in the Journal of Experimental Education. Students in these schools average about 3.1 hours of homework each night. Homework Matters: Great teachers set great homework.

As long as I’ve been teaching, I’ve held the view that homework makes a massive difference to the learning process.

Homework Matters: Great teachers set great homework

Without any doubt, students who are successful at A level and at GCSE are those who have highly developed independent learning skills, have the capacity to lead the learning process through their questions and ideas and, crucially, are resilient and resourceful enough to get over the many humps along the way. A strong culture of homework in any class or school, is key to developing these skills, particularly in a situation where families are not in a position to provide the necessary platform without a school-led structure. Importantly, homework does not have to mean, literally, ‘work done at home’; fairly obviously, we are talking about any tasks that students do in between lessons – at home, in the library, in the after-school club – whenever, wherever. However, despite what I regard as the critical importance of homework, I regularly hear or read these objections:

Flipping the modern classroom. What is flipped learning, and why is it becoming so popular?

Flipping the modern classroom

Jim Baker discusses why he considers it to be a vital way to maximise learning and make the most of a teacher’s limited time… First of all, for those unfamiliar with ‘flipped learning’, my presentation will help explain. Flipping is not new, as back in the 80s, before the days of the World Wide Web, I would give my students handouts to study in preparation for the next lesson (hence the term ‘prep’, as opposed to ‘homework’). This then freed up the lesson for learning where the content of the handouts could be discussed, questions on the handouts answered and practical work done to reinforce the handouts. The advent of the World Wide Web took this concept (now known as ‘flipped learning’) to a whole new level. Why should we ‘flip’? Conventionally, teachers give their students information in class. By providing various resources (notes, videos, animations etc) for each topic, hopefully each student will find one to suit them.

Flipped Learning Research Report Nesta. The Flipped Classroom. The Flipped Classroom Model: A Full Picture. Due to Khan Academy’s popularity, the idea of the flipped classroom has gained press and credibility within education circles.

The Flipped Classroom Model: A Full Picture

Briefly, the Flipped Classroom as described by Jonathan Martin is: Flip your instruction so that students watch and listen to your lectures… for homework, and then use your precious class-time for what previously, often, was done in homework: tackling difficult problems, working in groups, researching, collaborating, crafting and creating.

Classrooms become laboratories or studios, and yet content delivery is preserved. Flip your instruction so that students watch and listen to your lectures… for homework, and then use your precious class-time for what previously, often, was done in homework: tackling difficult problems, working in groups, researching, collaborating, crafting and creating. Classrooms become laboratories or studios, and yet content delivery is preserved ( A compiled resource page of the Flipped Classroom (with videos and links) can be found at. Flipped learning - page 39 of this PDF.