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20 Simple Assessment Strategies You Can Use Every Day. 20 Simple Assessment Strategies You Can Use Every Day by Saga Briggs The ultimate goal of teaching is understanding.

20 Simple Assessment Strategies You Can Use Every Day

But sometimes it’s easier to talk than to teach, as we all know, especially when we need to cover a lot of material in a short amount of time. We hope students will understand, if not now then before test time, and we keep our fingers crossed that their results will indicate we’ve done our job. The problem is, we often rely on these tests to measure understanding and then we move on. Below are 22 simple assessment strategies and tips to help you become more frequent in your teaching, planning, and curriculum design. 22 Simple Assessment Strategies & Tips You Can Use Every Day 1. Avoid yes/no questions and phrases like “Does this make sense?” 2. During the last five minutes of class ask students to reflect on the lesson and write down what they’ve learned. 3. Give a short quiz at the end of class to check for comprehension. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Empowering Teachers With Tech-Friendly Formative Assessment Tools.

Formative assessment is an important part of effective instruction.

Empowering Teachers With Tech-Friendly Formative Assessment Tools

Teachers can use observations, checklists, and quick quizzes to gather data that will inform their instruction. Formative assessment identifies areas where students are excelling and struggling so that teachers can best alter their instruction to meet the needs of all students. Earlier this year, I had the opportunity to work with a school looking to strengthen its formative assessment data collection by leveraging the power of tech-friendly tools. Technology can make formative assessment a seamless part of everyday activities. Online tools and mobile devices can help teachers stay organized when collecting data that will make analyzing information easier and more meaningful.

Choosing the Right Tool. 4 Easy Tips and Tricks for Creating Visually Engaging Rubrics. Lisa Yokana recently shared a useful rubric in her post on "Creating an Authentic Maker Education Rubric.

4 Easy Tips and Tricks for Creating Visually Engaging Rubrics

" As this post was making the rounds on social media, Edutopia staff received a number of requests to distribute a modifiable version of her sample maker rubric that educators could adjust to the particulars of their own settings. Editable Maker Rubric To satisfy that need, I’ve created two different versions of Lisa's sample maker rubric in Microsoft Word and Google Docs formats.

You can modify this template to create your own rubrics, either those based on Lisa’s example or on other great rubrics, some of which are listed at the bottom of this post. In addition, here are some tips and tricks to help you make the most use out of this sample rubric template. Rubric Design Tips and Tricks Form follows function. Everything on your page should have a job.

5 Tips for a More Meaningful Rubric. Sarah Wike Loyola , Upper School Spanish Teacher, Spanish Team Leader, and Technology Mentor in Charlotte, NC Posted 06/08/2015 12:26PM | Last Commented 07/06/2015 2:30PM Every educator feels pretty darn cool the first few times they grade students' work.

5 Tips for a More Meaningful Rubric

What a powerful feeling it ignites in us, right? However, the reality of how much time we have to spend grading sets in quickly and the task becomes more and more monotonous. No teacher digs grading the same problems, essay prompts, responses, etc. over and over again, but it is a large part of what we do on a daily basis. So, why not make it meaningful? Teachers who use rubrics: set clear guidelines and expectations from the outset of the school year. hold students accountable for the work they produce in a justifiable way. let their students know on which areas they need concentrate the next time they are given a similar task. see improvement in their students’ work. Teachers who do not use rubrics: Be consistent. Dipsticks: Efficient Ways to Check for Understanding. What strategy can double student learning gains?

According to 250 empirical studies, the answer is formative assessment, defined by Bill Younglove as "the frequent, interactive checking of student progress and understanding in order to identify learning needs and adjust teaching appropriately. " Unlike summative assessment, which evaluates student learning according to a benchmark, formative assessment monitors student understanding so that kids are always aware of their academic strengths and learning gaps. Meanwhile, teachers can improve the effectiveness of their instruction, re-teaching if necessary. "When the cook tastes the soup," writes Robert E. Stake, "that's formative; when the guests taste the soup, that's summative. " Alternative formative assessment (AFA) strategies can be as simple (and important) as checking the oil in your car -- hence the name "dipsticks.

" In the sections below, we'll discuss things to consider when implementing AFAs. 53 Ways to Check for Understanding. What is a Rubric? Heidi Andrade Rubrics have become popular with teachers as a means of communicating expectations for an assignment, providing focused feedback on works in progress, and grading final products.

What is a Rubric?

Although educators tend to define the word “rubric” in slightly different ways, Heidi Andrade’s commonly accepted definition is a document that articulates the expectations for an assignment by listing the criteria, or what counts, and describing levels of quality from excellent to poor. Rubric Gallery: List of public rubrics: RCampus.