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Brexit : comprendre les arguments pour et contre la sortie du Royaume-Uni de l’UE. Les entreprises en Grande-Bretagne pour et contre le Brexit Les « Remainers » Schématiquement, les multinationales sont plutôt contre un éventuel Brexit.

Brexit : comprendre les arguments pour et contre la sortie du Royaume-Uni de l’UE

Parmi elles, RioTinto, HSBC, Royal Dutch Shell, mais aussi les sociétés impliquées dans les mouvements internationaux, comme deux géants de l'aviation, RyanAir et EasyJet. Les fabricants d'automobiles sont aussi majoritairement pour l'Union européenne. En cas de Brexit, certaines pourraient décider d'aller sur le continent pour y établir leur siège social. Les « Leavers » Le groupe des sociétés pro-Brexit est plus varié.

Le choc d'un Brexit pourrait, à court terme, ralentir considérablement l'investissement commercial, la production et la consommation. European Referendum (easily explained) The UK's EU referendum: All you need to know. Image copyright Reuters What is happening?

The UK's EU referendum: All you need to know

A referendum is being held on Thursday, 23 June to decide whether Britain should leave or remain in the European Union. This article is designed to be an easy-to-understand guide - if you have any questions you can send them in using this link. We'll be answering a selection at the bottom of the page. What is a referendum? A referendum is basically a vote in which everyone (or nearly everyone) of voting age can take part, normally giving a "Yes" or "No" answer to a question. Why is a referendum being held? Prime Minister David Cameron promised to hold one if he won the 2015 general election, in response to growing calls from his own Conservative MPs and the UK Independence Party (UKIP), who argued that Britain had not had a say since 1975, when it voted to stay in the EU in a referendum. These 5 Facts Explain the Debate Over Brexit. Video: Brexit for Dummies - The English Blog.

This week promises to be a crucial one for UK Prime Minister David Cameron as he attempts to negotiate a deal with his European partners that would keep Britain in the EU and avoid Brexit.

Video: Brexit for Dummies - The English Blog

But what is Brexit, and what exactly is at stake? Watch this CNN Money video to find out. You can also do a quiz below based on the video transcript. TRANSCRIPTIt's called 'Brexit'. The very word conjures up something quite painful. DEFINITIONBrexit, an abbreviation of "British exit", mirrors the term Grexit ("Greek exit"), and refers to the possibility of Britain's withdrawal from the European Union. COMMENTI'll be glad when it's all over and we know where we stand one way or the other! Video: Brexit for Dummies - The English Blog. This week promises to be a crucial one for UK Prime Minister David Cameron as he attempts to negotiate a deal with his European partners that would keep Britain in the EU and avoid Brexit.

Video: Brexit for Dummies - The English Blog

But what is Brexit, and what exactly is at stake? Watch this CNN Money video to find out. You can also do a quiz below based on the video transcript. TRANSCRIPTIt's called 'Brexit'. The very word conjures up something quite painful. DEFINITIONBrexit, an abbreviation of "British exit", mirrors the term Grexit ("Greek exit"), and refers to the possibility of Britain's withdrawal from the European Union. Everything You Need To Know About 'Brexit' And The EU Referendum But Were Afraid To Ask. Brace yourself: for the next four months, the news bulletins will be dominated by talk of the UK’s referendum on whether to stay or leave the European Union.

Everything You Need To Know About 'Brexit' And The EU Referendum But Were Afraid To Ask

And, on June 23, we all get to vote. Many people’s first reaction is something like this. But stay with us. The referendum is arguably more important than any general election, changing Britain’s relationship with Europe and, in turn, the rest of the world. The arguments will range from the sublime to the ridiculous. There’ll also be nonsense: scaremongering, dirty tricks, low politics. Let’s step back to January 2013. Here’s the so-called Bloomberg speech. The plan was to slay two dragons with one mighty swipe: Nigel Farage’s insurgent Ukip, which was a real threat to the party’s share of the vote, and eurosceptic Tory MPs, a thorn in the side of successive Conservative Party leaders.

Books have been written on why, and it’s been a itch that has needed scratching for decades, according to Tories and tabloid newspapers. Yes. Him. Yes. The UK's EU referendum: All you need to know.