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Detroit's Staggering Murder And Violent Crime Rate Are 'A Public Health Issue'. Following news that Detroit was exiting bankruptcy and officials talking with optimism about the road ahead, grim new statistics drive home how much there is to do before the city’s future truly appears bright.

Detroit's Staggering Murder And Violent Crime Rate Are 'A Public Health Issue'

Detroit has the highest murder and violent crime rate of any major city in the country, according to the FBI. FBI Uniform Crime Reporting statistics released Monday show that Detroit logged 316 murders and non-negligent manslaughters last year, with a rate of 45 per 100,000 people. That’s the highest of U.S. cities with more than 200,000 residents and 10 times the national rate. The city also had 14,500 total violent crimes in 2013. The report defines murder and non-negligent manslaughter as the “willful (non-negligent) killing of one human being by another.” However, violent crime is no stranger to residents — and youth — in the Motor City. According to 2010 data analyzed by the Detroit News, homicide is the leading killer of children over age 1 and under 18 in Detroit. 10. More than 650 apply for 40 open Detroit police officer positions. DETROIT — More than 650 on Saturday applied for 40 current police officer openings on the Detroit Police Department.

A line of applicants, mostly men, many wearing ties and dress attire, stretched along the sidewalk leading to the entrance of the new Detroit Public Safety Headquarters located at 1301 Third. Detroit Police Chief James Craig was present to shake hands and welcome the potential officers. The department's pool applicants has dwindled in recent years and it's now time to replenish, Inspector LaShanda Houser, the department's new personnel director said last week. The turnout exceeded her expectations. Houser said more than 500 applied the last time the department hosted a recruiting fair in 2004. Related: DPD has first recruiting fair in nearly a decade. Other Cities Poach Police From Detroit's Low-Wage Force.

Officer Michael Crowder says his roots are too deep to leave Detroit, but he knows younger officers who were lured away by better pay.

Other Cities Poach Police From Detroit's Low-Wage Force

Dawn Uhl-Zifilippo hide caption itoggle caption Dawn Uhl-Zifilippo Officer Michael Crowder says his roots are too deep to leave Detroit, but he knows younger officers who were lured away by better pay. Dawn Uhl-Zifilippo In a Detroit police squad car, Officer Michael Crowder cruises through one of the city's more well-to-do neighborhoods. Crowder says he loves his current assignment — concentrating on a specific neighborhood community. "We've had food drives where the community comes up to the precinct," he says. Detroit police feel pain of city's financial collapse. Feb 23, 2014 By Sharon Cohen Associated Press DETROIT — It has come to this: Even some criminals sympathize with Detroit's cops.

Detroit police feel pain of city's financial collapse

Baron Coleman thought he'd heard it all in his 17 years patrolling the streets. But then came the city's bankruptcy, a 10 percent cut in police salaries, followed by support from a most unlikely corner — the bad guys. "When they saw us take a pay cut they were in shock. Motor City: The Story of Detroit. Detroit police struggle to protect bankrupt city. Aug 26, 2013 By Gina Damron Detroit Free Press DETROIT — Wind whipped through downed windows and the speedometer reached 90 m.p.h. as the police cruiser sped down the interstate.

Detroit police struggle to protect bankrupt city

Weaving through traffic, Detroit Police Officers Derrick Keasley and Darius Shepherd rushed to reach other officers, who were miles away chasing down a suspect in a neighborhood off Van Dyke. It was about 9 p.m. on a warm evening this month as the special operations officers tromped through high grass, then came to a yard, where they handily climbed a rusty chain link fence and landed next to a dilapidated and abandoned building. This suspect was gone, but the shift was hours from over. Guess What Detroit's Police Chief Credits For Crime Decline. Tweet The chief of Detroit police credited legally armed residents for a substantial decrease in crime in a city that desperately needs it.

Guess What Detroit's Police Chief Credits For Crime Decline

“Criminals are getting the message that good Detroiters are armed and will use that weapon,” said chief James Craig, according to The Detroit News. “I don’t want to take away from the good work our investigators are doing, but I think part of the drop in crime, and robberies in particular, is because criminals are thinking twice that citizens could be armed.” According to The Detroit News, there have been 37 percent fewer robberies, 22 percent fewer break-ins and 30 percent fewer carjackings this so far in 2014 compared to the same period last year. “I can’t say what specific percentage is caused by this, but there’s no question in my mind it has had an effect,” Craig said.

The chief cited fewer stories of Detroit homeowners having to fire weapons at intruders as evidence that criminals are getting the message. Crime rate in Detroit, Michigan (MI): murders, rapes, robberies, assaults, burglaries, thefts, auto thefts, arson, law enforcement employees, police officers statistics. Detroit led U.S. in murder, crime rates, FBI says.