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Welcome to Cloud.typography. Webfonts remove the barriers between your text and your readers.

Welcome to Cloud.typography

Unlike type in an image, type in a webfont is real text: it’s searchable and selectable by readers, it magnifies crisply to any size, it works with in-browser translation services, it’s clear at any resolution, and it can be used in dynamic page elements such as searchbars and forms. Machines can read webfonts, too, and the more of your site a search engine can see, the better. Webfonts make it possible to use real text for every part of your site, from text to logos. And search robots aren’t the only technologies that can read webfonts: users with disabilities can finally use assistive devices to read all of your site’s content.

Meet the designer behind some of the web’s newest killer fonts. Founders of Hoefler & Frere-Jones Jonathan Hoefler (left) and Tobias Frere-Jones (right) The font world is being revolutionized.

Meet the designer behind some of the web’s newest killer fonts

Thanks to newer browsers and greater bandwidth, there’s been an explosion of new web fonts — tens of thousands of them over the last decade. We used to be stuck with Helvetica, Times New Roman or Comic Sans. New we’ve got hot new fonts like Mercury, Helvetica Neue and Museo Slab. These new-style fonts not only are prettier, they are designed with pixels in mind, so they reproduce much better on devices of different sizes. Crisper typography, which is part of a larger design renaissance on the web, is more important than ever amid greater competition from native apps and rise of things like retina displays. What’s next in fonts? In with the new, out with the old See some samples of H&FJ’s most popular fonts, compared with the older print-centric fonts they’re replacing. 2 / 6Gotham versus Helvetica 4 / 6Mercury versus Georgia.

Chunk. The 100 Best Fonts (in a Huge Sortable Table) The League of Moveable Type. MyFonts. "What Font Should I Use?". Advertisement For many beginners, the task of picking fonts is a mystifying process.

"What Font Should I Use?"

There seem to be endless choices — from normal, conventional-looking fonts to novelty candy cane fonts and bunny fonts — with no way of understanding the options, only never-ending lists of categories and recommendations. Selecting the right typeface is a mixture of firm rules and loose intuition, and takes years of experience to develop a feeling for. Here are five guidelines for picking and using fonts that I’ve developed in the course of using and teaching typography. 1.

Many of my beginning students go about picking a font as though they were searching for new music to listen to: they assess the personality of each face and look for something unique and distinctive that expresses their particular aesthetic taste, perspective and personal history. The most appropriate analogy for picking type.

For better or for worse, picking a typeface is more like getting dressed in the morning. 2. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Free Fonts (2012 Edition) Advertisement Every now and then, we look around, select fresh free high-quality fonts and present them to you in a brief overview.

Free Fonts (2012 Edition)

The choice is enormous, so the time you need to find them is usually time you should be investing in your projects. We search for them and find them so that you don’t have to. In this selection, we’re pleased to present Homestead, Bree Serif, Levanderia, Valencia, Nomed Font, Carton and other quality fonts. Please note that while most fonts are available for commercial projects, some are for personal use only and are clearly marked as such in their descriptions. Free Fonts HomesteadHomestead is a very distinctive Slab Serif typeface that leaves a lasting impression with its geometric forms and a modern, progressive look. Bree Serif RegularThis typeface is the serif cousin of the playful, charming and versatile type family Bree which was designed by Veronika Burian and José Scaglione back in 2008. Novecento (Registration on MyFonts is required!) Last Click.

Abstract Fonts.