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IBM, a Pioneer of Remote Work, Calls Workers Back to the Office - WSJ. Google wants to use its search power and machine learning to help more people find jobs. Your next job may come courtesy of Google.

Google wants to use its search power and machine learning to help more people find jobs

Google for Jobs, announced at Google's I/O developer conference in Mountain View, CA on Wednesday, will use machine learning to collect and organize millions of job postings from across the internet to better connect employers and job seekers. "Google for Jobs is our commitment to use our products to help people find work," said Google CEO Sundar Pichai in the first keynote address. "We've been talking about machine learning in terms of how it will power new experiences and research," Pichai said. "But it's also important we think about how this technology can have an immediate impact on people's lives by creating opportunities for economic empowerment. " Some 46% of US employers say they face talent shortages and have issues filling open positions, while many job seekers are looking for openings, Pichai noted.

Many people already begin their job search on Google, Pichai said. The 3 big takeaways for TechRepublic readers 1. 2. Will automation take away all our jobs? iStock Here’s a startling fact: in the 45 years since the introduction of the automated teller machine, those vending machines that dispense cash, the number of human bank tellers employed in the United States has roughly doubled, from about a quarter of a million in 1970 to a half a million today, with 100,000 added since the year 2000.

Will automation take away all our jobs?

These facts, revealed in Boston University economist James Bessen’s recent book Learning by Doing, raise an intriguing question: What are all those tellers doing, and why hasn’t automation eliminated their employment by now? If you think about it, many of the great inventions of the last 200 years were designed to replace human labor. Tractors were developed to substitute mechanical power for human physical toil. Automation will have a bigger impact on jobs in smaller cities. SM/AIUEO/Getty By Timothy Revell The robot takeover will start in the smaller cities.

Automation will have a bigger impact on jobs in smaller cities

Towns and small cities have a smaller proportion of jobs that will be resilient to automation than larger urban centres, according to a new study. By looking at the jobs that are most susceptible to automation and their distribution across different US cities, Iyad Rahwan at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab and his team have found a trend between the size of a city and the impact we should expect artificial intelligence and robots to have on human workers.

Roughly speaking, cities with fewer than 100,000 inhabitants are more at risk. The East Coast cities are full of jobs that should be resilient to automation. Advertisement. Atlassian Futurist Sees Teamwork, not Chatbots, Defining the Future of Work - The New Stack. It’s not news that artificial intelligence (AI) will probably change our jobs in pretty fundamental ways.

Atlassian Futurist Sees Teamwork, not Chatbots, Defining the Future of Work - The New Stack

But what are these changes going to look like? Do we have any control over the path that takes? And how best can we prepare for the future? Not to worry, said Dominic Price, who is the head of research and development and resident “work futurist” at Atlassian. During a recent phone interview he noted that in the last 144 years, technology created more jobs than it took away. As a society, when we get nervous, we can’t always image what those new roles will be, he explained. Source: Atlassian. AI and Teamwork “In a nutshell,” Price said in his recent blog post, “we’re not ready for AI because we still haven’t figured out how to work together as humans.” Price spent three and a half years running program management globally for the company.

Growing pains are never fun, but Price started to look for solutions. Teams at Play. Three Major Reasons Automation Won't Leave You Unemployed. In Brief A large percentage of the American workforce is at high risk of losing their jobs to automation, but that doesn't mean they are destined to be unemployed.

Three Major Reasons Automation Won't Leave You Unemployed

Automation of some jobs and innovation will usher in new jobs as our economy changes. Losing Jobs Right now in the United States there is a duel raging on between who or what to scapegoat for the disappearance of certain jobs. One side blames Mexico and China, international trade, and outsiders generally. By 2020, AIs could be powering 85 percent of customer service transactions, rendering them human-free.

Either we are living in a time which is historically unique for job loss and change, or this is just the next stage in an economic cycle. Trading In D-List Jobs First, new technologies always usher in new jobs as they eliminate existing positions. The only way…is to train the talent that we have. Second, when automation results in job loss, the lost jobs are typically positions that are tough to keep staffed. In the workplace of the future, these are the skills employers want.

China is rapidly making robots that will one day manufacture everything you buy — Quartz. In the public conversation about the mass incarceration crisis in the US, there’s a widely accepted diagnosis for why the country’s prisons and jails are bursting at the seams.

China is rapidly making robots that will one day manufacture everything you buy — Quartz

The story—propelled by academics, politicians, journalists, Oscar-nominated documentaries, and civic-minded celebrities—goes like this: The US prison population is ballooning because the “War on Drugs” needlessly put countless drug offenders behind bars; non-violent felons are getting egregiously long sentences; private prisons are a cancer on the system; and that a lot of this can be blamed—and should be resolved—by the federal government in Washington, DC. “We focus on the wrong thing and we actually adopt policies that won’t work.” But criminologist and law professor John Pfaff thinks that all this—what he calls the “Standard Story” of mass incarceration gets many things wrong. What the Standard Story gets wrong. Economists May Be Underestimating How Fast the Robots Are Coming - Bloomberg. Economists may be underestimating the impact on labor markets of increasing automation and the rise of artificial intelligence, according to a post published on the Bank of England’s staff blog on Wednesday.

Economists May Be Underestimating How Fast the Robots Are Coming - Bloomberg

“The potential for simultaneous and rapid disruption, coupled with the breadth of human functions that AI might replicate, may have profound implications for labor markets,” BOE regional agents Mauricio Armellini and Tim Pike wrote in the Bank Underground post. “Economists should seriously consider the possibility that millions of people may be at risk of unemployment, should these technologies be widely adopted.” Robots and intelligent machines threaten to replace workers in industries from finance to retail to haulage, with BOE Chief Economist Andrew Haldane estimating in 2015 that 15 million British jobs and 80 million in the U.S. could be lost to automation.