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Drink without drowning from the Twitter River. With some software, you can divide the Twitter River into drinkable streams (Image: River Itchen Weir by neilalderney123 on flickr CC) For the past few weeks, I’ve been participating in #etmooc, a massive open online course (MOOC) about educational technology and media.

Drink without drowning from the Twitter River

This is a cMOOC, where the goal is connecting people and building a community, as opposed to an xMOOC where you watch videos, do assignments and so on. And so, there is a lot of online community building occurring through Blackboard Collaborate, a Google+ community, hundreds of blogs and, my tool-of-choice, Twitter. In addition to the the #etmooc backchannel that lights up during the live, Blackboard Collaborate sessions, there are weekly Twitter chat sessions #etmchat. There are many new twitter users participating in #etmooc – getting on Twitter is part of the course.

Step 1: Get a program to access Twitter Use something other than a web browser pointing to twitter.com to access your tweets. Step 2: Create a First list. Tech Teaching Tools. Tech Teaching Tools. Infuse Learning into Your Class. I love using Socrative, Polls Everywhere, and Cel.ly for daily response and student feedback.

Infuse Learning into Your Class

I recently discovered Infuse Learning, which combines many of the features I love into one simple to use program. Long Live Paper. People often ask me why I have an iPad and a... Education Technology Expert, Will Richardson, Dazzles at Renbrook. Help Center. 50 Little-Known Ways Google Docs Can Help In Education. 5 Ways To Be A Better Public Speaker 7.16K Views 0 Likes If you've been asked to speak at a conference or host a seminar, you may be shaking in your boots.

Not only is the thought of speaking in public nerve-wracking, but being in charge of a seminar that no one wants to at... My 10 Favorite Learnist Boards Of The Year 2.66K Views 0 Likes I wanted to take a moment and share my favorite Learnist boards from the past year. Your Brain on Computers - Digital Devices Deprive Brain of Needed Downtime. The Joy of Quiet. How to Use Google Search More Effectively [INFOGRAPHIC] Among certain circles (my family, some of my coworkers, etc.)

How to Use Google Search More Effectively [INFOGRAPHIC]

I'm known for my Googling skills. I can find anything, anywhere, in no time flat. My Google-fu is a helpful skill, but not one that's shrouded in too much mystery — I've just mastered some very helpful search tricks and shortcuts and learned to quickly identify the best info in a list of results. Sadly, though web searches have become and integral part of the academic research landscape, the art of the Google search is an increasingly lost one. A recent study at Illinois Wesleyan University found that fewer than 25% of students could perform a "reasonably well-executed search. " That search process also included determining when to rely on Google and when to utilize scholarly databases, but on a fundamental level, it appears that many people just don't understand how to best find the information they seek using Google. Thanks to the folks at HackCollege, a number of my "secrets" are out. Infographic via HackCollege.

Mac OS X keyboard shortcuts. By pressing a combination of keys, you can do things that normally need a mouse, trackpad, or other input device.

Mac OS X keyboard shortcuts

To use a keyboard shortcut, hold down one or more modifier keys while pressing the last key of the shortcut. For example, to use the shortcut Command-C (copy), hold down Command, press C, then release both keys. Mac menus and keyboards often use symbols for certain keys, including the modifier keys: Command ⌘Shift ⇧ Option ⌥Control ⌃ Caps Lock ⇪Fn If you're using a keyboard made for Windows PCs, use the Alt key instead of Option, and the Windows logo key instead of Command. To learn more shortcuts, check the menus of the app you're using. What Will The Ed Tech Revolution Look Like? During the past 40 years, accounting for inflation, we have nearly tripled the amount of money we spend per student in public K-12 education.

What Will The Ed Tech Revolution Look Like?

It was roughly $4,000 in 1971, and last year amounted to $11,000 per student. Over that same period time, our students’ math and verbal test scores have remained unchanged. I am no Warren Buffett, but I can comfortably say to you that that is a lousy return on investment. In an increasingly competitive world, it is clear that our education system--as currently designed--isn’t sustainable. Simply throwing more money at a system that produces the same results is, well, not smart.

In a perverse way, I believe federal and state budget cuts will help focus us on doing things differently and more efficiently. Similar to the consumer tech revolution, this ed tech revolution will take some time and happen unevenly in waves. First Wave (0 to 5 years from now): A Change in Perception Second Wave (5 to 10 years from now): A Change in Purchasing an Empowerment.