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Medieval Period

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Code of Chivalry. Facts and interesting information about the life and times of theMedieval Knights of England - Code of Chivalry Code of Chivalry There was not an authentic Code of Chivalry as such.

Code of Chivalry

The Code of Chivalry was a moral system which went beyond rules of combat and introduced the concept of Chivalrous conduct - qualities idealized by the Medieval knights such as bravery, courtesy, honor and great gallantry toward women. The Codes of chivalry also incorporated the notion of courtly love. The Code of Chivalry was the honor code of the knight. Courtly Love - World History in Context. One of the most commonly held, and perhaps most misunderstood, modern notions about the Middle Ages is the type of romantic or erotic love believed to have been practiced in the period, popularly referred to as "courtly love.

Courtly Love - World History in Context

" Courtly love is a cluster of related ideas and sensibilities characterizing an extreme expression of romantic passion that was demonstrated frequently by characters in medieval literature, especially in courtly romances and the love lyrics of the French troubadours and the German minnesingers. The term "courtly love" was never used in medieval texts, although medieval authors and poets did use the term fin'amors (refined love) to describe the extremes of emotion experienced, often suffered, by male protagonists in romances and by the lover singing love songs to his beloved in the lyric tradition.

But what exactly was the late medieval European phenomenon known popularly as "courtly love"? The knights and ladies at the aristocratic courts. A. E. W. J. Ebola virus: 9 things to know about the killer disease. "It is a highly infectious virus that can kill up to 90% of the people who catch it, causing terror among infected communities," it says.

Ebola virus: 9 things to know about the killer disease

There is also no vaccination against it. Of Ebola's five subtypes, the Zaire strain -- the first to be identified -- is considered the most deadly. What is Ebola? The Ebola virus causes viral hemorrhagic fever, which according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), refers to a group of viruses that affect multiple organ systems in the body and are often accompanied by bleeding. New Theories Link Black Death to Ebola-Like Virus. Between 1347 and 1352, a mysterious disease ravaged Europe, killing an estimated 25 million people -- 30 percent to 50 percent of the population.

New Theories Link Black Death to Ebola-Like Virus

At the time, people said the disease was caused by a peculiar conjunction of the planets, by a miasma stirred up by earthquakes in Central Asia or by a conspiracy of Jews to undermine Christendom. Many called it the wrath of God and expected the end of the world. Although the pandemic now called the Black Death lasted no more than six years, according to most medieval historians, the disease behind it erupted periodically in different parts of Europe for the next three centuries, leaving millions more dead in its wake. Then it largely vanished from the continent, but questions over its origins remained.

In 1894, two scientists, Dr. Dr. Was Ebola Behind the Black Death? Controversial new research suggests that contrary to the history books, the "Black Death" that devastated medieval Europe was not the bubonic plague, but rather an Ebola-like virus.

Was Ebola Behind the Black Death?

History books have long taught the Black Death, which wiped out a quarter of Europe's population in the Middle Ages, was caused by bubonic plague, spread by infected fleas that lived on black rats. But new research in England suggests the killer was actually an Ebola-like virus transmitted directly from person to person. The Black Death killed some 25 million Europeans in a devastating outbreak between 1347 and 1352, and then reappeared periodically for more than 300 years.

Scholars had thought flea-infested rats living on ships brought the disease from China to Italy and then the rest of the continent. Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever. Medieval “Black Death” Was Airborne, Scientists Say - History in the Headlines. Print Cite Article Details:Medieval “Black Death” Was Airborne, Scientists Say Author Sarah Pruitt Website Name History.com Year Published 2014 Title Medieval “Black Death” Was Airborne, Scientists Say URL Access Date March 25, 2016 Publisher A+E Networks The so-called Black Death arrived in Britain from central Asia in the autumn of 1348.

Medieval “Black Death” Was Airborne, Scientists Say - History in the Headlines

Believed to be bubonic plague, spread by infected fleas carried on rats, the disease swept through Europe over the better part of the next year. One of history’s most devastating epidemics, it killed an estimated 75 million people, including six in every 10 Londoners. Now, analysis of skeletal remains found by construction workers digging railway tunnels in central London has led scientists to a stunning new conclusion: The Black Death was not transmitted through flea bites at all, but was an airborne plague spread through the coughs, sneezes and breath of infected human victims.

Coroner's Report: Plague Video - Black Death. You're almost done!

Coroner's Report: Plague Video - Black Death

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