Pentagon Papers A CIA map of dissident activities in Indochina published as part of the Pentagon papers The Pentagon Papers, officially titled United States – Vietnam Relations, 1945–1967: A Study Prepared by the Department of Defense, is a United States Department of Defense history of the United States' political-military involvement in Vietnam from 1945 to 1967. The papers were discovered and released by Daniel Ellsberg, and first brought to the attention of the public on the front page of The New York Times in 1971.[1] A 1996 article in The New York Times said that the Pentagon Papers had demonstrated, among other things, that the Johnson Administration "systematically lied, not only to the public but also to Congress Pentagon Papers
Daniel Ellsberg Daniel Ellsberg Daniel Ellsberg (born April 7, 1931) is a former United States military analyst who, while employed by the RAND Corporation, precipitated a national political controversy in 1971 when he released the Pentagon Papers, a top-secret Pentagon study of U.S. government decision-making in relation to the Vietnam War, to The New York Times and other newspapers. He was awarded the Right Livelihood Award in 2006. He is also known for popularising part of decision theory, the Ellsberg paradox (postulated before by John Maynard Keynes in 1921). Early life and career[edit] Ellsberg was born in Chicago on April 7, 1931,[1] the son of Adele D. (née Charsky) and Harry Ellsberg.[2] His parents were Ashkenazi Jews who had converted to Christian Science, and he was raised in a Christian Science atmosphere.
Just because some documents are classified doesn't mean that they're news or even necessarily interesting. A case in point is the cache of 92,000 secret documents about the Afghanistan war that someone leaked to WikiLeaks, which passed them on to the New York Times, Britain's Guardian, and Der Spiegel in Germany. All three published several of these documents—presumably the highlights—in today's editions. Fred Kaplan is the author of The Insurgents and the Edward R. Murrow press fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. No one who's been paying attention should be surprised by the WikiLeaks documents about the war in Afghanistan. - By Fred Kaplan No one who's been paying attention should be surprised by the WikiLeaks documents about the war in Afghanistan. - By Fred Kaplan
Daniel Ellsberg, a former US military analyst, has described the disclosure of the Afghan war logs as on the scale of his leaking of the "Pentagon Papers" in 1971 revealing how the US public was misled about the Vietnam war. "An outrageous escalation of the war is taking place," he said. "Look at these cables and see if they give anybody the occasion to say the answer is 'resources''. He added: "After $300bn and 10 years, the Taliban is stronger than they have ever been … We are recruiting for them." Daniel Ellsberg describes Afghan war logs as on a par with 'Pentagon Papers' | World news Daniel Ellsberg describes Afghan war logs as on a par with 'Pentagon Papers' | World news
The New Pentagon Papers: WikiLeaks Releases 90,000+ Secret Military Documents Painting Devastating Picture of Afghanistan War This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form. AMY GOODMAN: It’s one the biggest leaks in US military history. More than 90,000 internal records from US military actions in Afghanistan over the past six years have been published by the whistleblower website WikiLeaks. The New Pentagon Papers: WikiLeaks Releases 90,000+ Secret Military Documents Painting Devastating Picture of Afghanistan War
Pause for a moment before accepting the comparison that Wikileaks founder Julian Assange makes between his release of more than 90,000 secret military documents about the Afghan fighting to that of the Pentagon Papers back in 1971. In his interview with The Guardian, Assange said, "The nearest analogue is the Pentagon Papers that exposed how the United States was prosecuting the war in Vietnam." There are some major differences. In the first place, the Pentagon Papers was a top secret history of the U.S. political and military involvement in Vietnam from 1945 through 1967 ordered by then-Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara which was pulled together by military historians. Wikileaks' Afghanistan War Log vs. the Pentagon Papers Wikileaks' Afghanistan War Log vs. the Pentagon Papers
Ellsberg: ‘These documents are not the Pentagon Papers’