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The General Prologue - Translation. Phlebotomy: The Ancient Art of Bloodletting" - MuseumofQuackery.com. Phlebotomy: The Ancient Art of Bloodletting By Graham Ford The practice of bloodletting seemed logical when the foundation of all medical treatment was based on the four body humors: blood, phlegm, yellow bile, and black bile. Health was thought to be restored by purging, starving, vomiting or bloodletting. The art of bloodletting was flourishing well before Hippocrates in the fifth century B.C. By the middle ages, both surgeons and barbers were specializing in this bloody practice. Bloodletting came to the U. A variety of devices were used to draw blood: The lancet was first used before 5th Century B.C. Spring loaded lancet Spring loaded lancets came into use during the early 18th Century. Scarificator The scarificator, a series of twelve blades, was also in vogue during the 18th Century, This device was cocked and the trigger released spring-driven rotary blades which caused many shallow cuts.

Blood was caught in shallow bowls. Flint cup Graphics from the Truax, Green & Co. Previous next. The history of bloodletting | BC Medical Journal. With a history spanning at least 3000 years, bloodletting has only recently—in the late 19th century—been discredited as a treatment for most ailments. The practice of bloodletting began around 3000 years ago with the Egyptians, then continued with the Greeks and Romans, the Arabs and Asians, then spread through Europe during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.

It reached its peak in Europe in the 19th century but subsequently declined and today in Western medicine is used only for a few select conditions. Humors, Hippocrates, and Galen To appreciate the rationale for bloodletting one must first understand the paradigm of disease 2300 years ago in the time of Hippocrates (~460–370 BC). He believed that existence was represented by the four basic elements—earth, air, fire, and water—which in humans were related to the four basic humors: blood, phlegm, black bile, yellow bile. Being ill meant having an imbalance of the four humors. Why did it persist?

A Brief History of Bloodletting - History in the Headlines. The ancient practice of bloodletting might offer cardiovascular benefits to obese people with metabolic syndrome, a new study published today in the journal BMC Medicine suggests. As the medical community contemplates its revival, explore this long-abandoned procedure’s age-old history, from its early roots to its use on figures such as George Washington and Marie-Antoinette. Several thousand years ago, whether you were an Egyptian with migraines or a feverish Greek, chances are your doctor would try one first-line treatment before all others: bloodletting. He or she would open a vein with a lancet or sharpened piece of wood, causing blood to flow out and into a waiting receptacle.

If you got lucky, leeches might perform the gruesome task in place of crude instruments. Considered one of medicine’s oldest practices, bloodletting is thought to have originated in ancient Egypt. America’s first president was less fortunate than France’s most infamous queen. 10 Bizarre Medieval Medical Practices. Creepy Medicine is one of the cornerstones of modern civilization—so much so that we take it for granted.

It wasn’t always the case that you could just waltz into a doctor’s office to have them cure what ailed you. In medieval times, for example, things were a lot more dangerous, and a lot stranger. 10 Boar Bile Enemas Enemas in medieval times were performed by devices called clysters. Even kings were high up on the clyster. 9 Urine Was Used As An Antiseptic Though it may not have been common, there is evidence to suggest that urine was occasionally used as an antiseptic in the Medieval Era. This isn’t quite as insane as it seems: urine is sterile when it leaves the body and may have been a healthier alternative than most water—which came with no such guarantee of cleanliness. 8 Eye Surgery (With A Needle) During the Middle Ages, cataract surgery was performed with a thick needle.

Of course, eye surgery changed rapidly once Islamic medicine began to influence European practices. 4 Trepanning. Superstitions of medieval England | Historic Chronicles. Many superstitions today are a result of regional moral panic, these origins date back to medieval times when there was much ignorance in society and widespread illiteracy. It was an era where people believed in witches, evil spirits, and demons. There was a great belief in magic and the supernatural. People were extremely superstitious during this time period. Today, people still look back to the time of fearful peasants and their superstitions.

For people who could read during this time, there was a list of what was known as “evil days” printed in almanacs. There were three Mondays in the year when new ventures should never be started and these were the first Monday in April, the second Monday in August and the last Monday in December. During the mid 15th century, an estimated 200,000 people throughout Europe were put to death for practicing witchcraft. The phrase “bless you” was believed to originate from medieval superstition. Like this: Like Loading... 10 Completely Uncanny Superstitions From The Middle Ages. Weird Stuff In the pre-scientific Middle Ages, the world was at the same time both fascinating and frightening. In the absence of proper knowledge, people had no choice but to fall back on their own imaginations to make sense of the myriad natural phenomena around them.

The result was a world where everything seemed magical, a place teeming with angels and demons, fairies and goblins, elves, gnomes, and witches. This list takes us inside the medieval mind and the fears and superstitions through which it tried to explain the world. 10 The Sea In The Sky For this story, we are indebted to English chronicler Gervase of Tilbury and his work Otia Imperiala. For proof, Gervase offers an episode that took place in an English village. Another tale concerns a merchant who accidentally dropped his knife while out at sea. 9 Omens Of Charlemagne’s Death The Frankish king Charlemagne was crowned Holy Roman Emperor in A.D. 800. 8 Magonia 7 Changelings 6 The Royal Touch 5 The Wild Man Of Orford.

The Middle Ages: Feudal Life.