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Communicating science to a wide audience

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Triple R - Melbourne Independent Radio - 102.7FM > Program Guide > Einstein A Go-Go. Why storytelling is important in job interviews - Best Practice. If you find yourself just missing out on that dream job or not consistently making it to the second round of job interviews, chances are you need to up your storytelling skills, writes Gabrielle Dolan.

Why storytelling is important in job interviews - Best Practice

Going into a job interview with the necessary skills, experience and qualifications is crucial, however preparing and sharing a variety of personal and work related stories can demonstrate your capabilities and values, and significantly increase your chances of success. Many job candidates tend to only share work-related stories in job interviews, but you shouldn't underestimate the power of sharing relevant personal stories. The four story types The literal story A work-related story that demonstrates a specific capability you have. The learn story Usually a work-related story, though sometimes it can be a personal one, that shows what you learned from a particular experience. The like story The lateral story. It's Time for Scientists to Stop Explaining So Much. "I explained how vaccines work, and they still weren't going to vaccinate their kid.

It's Time for Scientists to Stop Explaining So Much

What else am I supposed to do? If they don't want to learn, then I can't help them. " This is the gist of several conversations I've had with a few scientist friends. I wasn't sure who was more frustrated—my colleagues, bewildered by people who refused to act in accord with scientific recommendation, or me, irritated that my friends could so callously wash their hands of any responsibility on an important public health issue simply because they were met with skepticism.

Fortunately, some scientists are keen on trying new approaches to reach the public. This theory of science communication, the so-called "deficit model," suggests that public skepticism of science is due to a lack of information and understanding, and can be overcome if more information is provided. The irony is that if the deficit model did apply, it should be to scientists. 60 Great Science Communication Stories You Shouldn't Miss › The Leap.

Shutterstock: Welcome to the FINAL SCICOMM 25 on Scilogs.com!

60 Great Science Communication Stories You Shouldn't Miss › The Leap

At the end of August this platform will disappear, but I'm currently setting up a new home for this blog. Stay tuned for the exciting details. Now back to your regularly scheduled post... This is where I pull together 25 (or more) of most talked about science communication stories, determined by the engagement rate of stories I've shared on Twitter. Some offer tips and advice, while others tackle important issues we need to discuss and debate.

I hope you enjoy this month's list, which includes posts I found during the month of July 2016. The Secret to Activating Your Audience’s Brain. If you are like me, you are always looking for the latest and greatest ways to do things faster, better, and cheaper.

The Secret to Activating Your Audience’s Brain

Personally, I get a thrill as I hunt for the best piece of hardware, software, or acclaimed process that will “change my life.” In the world of presentations, there is one key ingredient that will radically change them – specifically, how you engage your audience and how they perceive you. Beware of nominalizations (AKA zombie nouns) - Helen Sword. ASC National Conference 2016 – Keynote address from Chief Scientist Dr Alan Finkel AO. Below you will find the transcript from the keynote delivered by Australia’s eighth Chief Scientist Dr Alan Finkel AO at the 2016 ASC National Conference on March 11 at the Queensland University of Technology.

ASC National Conference 2016 – Keynote address from Chief Scientist Dr Alan Finkel AO

How to write a blogpost from your journal article in eleven easy steps. You’ve just published a research article – why should you bother writing a blog post about it?

How to write a blogpost from your journal article in eleven easy steps.

Patrick Dunleavy argues that if you’ve devoted months to writing the paper, dealing with comments, doing rewrites and hacking through the publishing process, why would you not spend the extra couple of hours crafting an accessible blogpost? Here he breaks down in eleven easy steps how to generate a short-form version of your research article. One of the oddest things that people in academic life regularly say to me is: ‘I’m not paid to write blogposts, only research articles. If my department or the grant-funder wants to start paying me for doing posts, then that would be a different matter’. Or alternatively, the argument goes: ‘I just don’t have the time to do blogging’. Apparently then a lot of folk suffer from some serious misconceptions about what writing a blogpost entails: If you thought all blogs are solo blogs, you could find the previous paragraph puzzling. 1.

TED Talk Takeaways: 8 Ways to Hook Your Audience. “You will live 7.5 minutes longer than you would have otherwise, just because you watched this talk.”

TED Talk Takeaways: 8 Ways to Hook Your Audience

This was the claim that video game designer Jane McGonigal presented to the crowd during her June 2012 TED talk. As the camera panned over the members of the audience, their faces showed universal skepticism: Was this lady serious? There was something else interesting about that crowd. Despite their doubtful visages, everyone in the audience was drawn in by McGonigal’s words. Society needs more than wonder to respect science.

I don't normally watch football on television, but recently I have been paying attention.

Society needs more than wonder to respect science

What has happened in sports presenting, with former and current players replacing specialist journalists, is creeping into science coverage too.