background preloader

Mellick

Facebook Twitter

zach mellick

Why College Athletes Should be Paid. There has been major discussion recently if college athletes should or shouldn’t be paid while they are in school.

Why College Athletes Should be Paid

The first thing opponents say is, “They’re already getting a scholarship! That’s more than anybody else! Don’t be greedy!” Fine, let’s not be greedy and look at how much a scholarship is actually worth. On average, a full Division 1 scholarship is $25,000 per year. “That’s $100,000 over four years!” Yes it is, but most athletes don’t last at a school for the whole four years.

A $25,000 scholarship may seem like a lot of money, but it really only covers the basics. Contrary to what all the opponents believe, being an athlete is a full-time job. For a little extra money to see a movie or go out to dinner once a week, my freshman roommate worked a job at the university, earning about $7/hour. However, once the season started up, he couldn’t work that job anymore. An Economist Explains Why College Athletes Should Be Paid. On Thursday I spoke to Andy Schwarz, a leading anti-trust economist, for some straight common sense about about the NCAA, college sports and paying athletes.

An Economist Explains Why College Athletes Should Be Paid

His words should be CliffsNotes for everyone watching March Madness. On why NCAA athletes should receive some sort of monetary compensation: I always say the question of whether they should get paid is the wrong one. I think the question is, “If the NCAA weren’t colluding against them, would they get paid?” And the answer is, “Yes, they would.” A Way to Start Paying College Athletes. Photo Joe Nocera is the new sports business columnist for The New York Times.

A Way to Start Paying College Athletes

I wrote my first article for The New York Times about the four years ago. Appearing in the magazine, it was headlined “Let’s Start Paying College Athletes.” Although I had been a college basketball fan all my life, I had never paid much attention to the inner workings of the N.C.A.A. But my research woke me up to the inequities faced by college football and men’s basketball players, and compelled me to begin writing regularly about how the N.C.A.A. and the college sports establishment exploit the players who generate the billions that the grown-ups pocket. The conceit for the original article was to imagine that the N.C.A.A.’s “amateurism” model — which, of course, enables that exploitation — had magically disappeared, finally allowing athletes to be paid.

Hardest Hits in College Football - Top 30(2015-16') Top 10 Reasons College Athletes Should Be Paid. Top 10 Reasons College Athletes Should Be Paid When the NCAA was founded by President Roosevelt in 1905, the institution was committed to the idea of not providing a salary or stipend to the student-athletes who took part in its organization.

Top 10 Reasons College Athletes Should Be Paid

It is based on the idea of amateurism, and this was a notable idea […] Top 10 Reasons College Athletes Should Be Paid When the NCAA was founded by President Roosevelt in 1905, the institution was committed to the idea of not providing a salary or stipend to the student-athletes who took part in its organization. It is based on the idea of amateurism, and this was a notable idea at the time. But, over a century later, the NCAA is no longer recognizable compared to what the organization used to be.

Yet, despite all of this cash floating around, the players who make the organization work do not see any of this money. 'I Trusted 'Em': When NCAA Schools Abandon Their Injured Athletes - Meghan Walsh. Arkansas tailback Darren McFadden (5) rushes against South Carolina defensive tackle Stanley Doughty (55) during the third quarter of a Southeastern Conference game in 2005.

'I Trusted 'Em': When NCAA Schools Abandon Their Injured Athletes - Meghan Walsh

(AP / April L. Brown) "Intercollegiate athletics programs shall be conducted in a manner designed to protect and enhance the physical and educational well-being of student-athletes. " - 2012-13 NCAA Division I Manual The National Collegiate Athletics Association Division I manual includes more than 400 pages of mandates for its member schools. But there is less than a page regarding healthcare for athletes.

Instead, there's a half-page list of healthcare services that institutions may finance should they choose. In other words, after an incoming student signs a letter of intent binding him or her to a university, many schools have no contractual obligation to treat injuries or strains that result from playing for that college. Some schools, maybe even most, provide exceptional care for their athletes. Revenue. How can the NCAA make so much money and be considered nonprofit?

Revenue

The NCAA’s designation as a nonprofit association is based on how it uses money and not on how much revenue is generated. All but 4 percent of NCAA revenue is either returned directly to member conferences and institutions or used to support championships and programs that benefit student-athletes. Where does the NCAA get its money? Most NCAA revenue (81 percent projected for 2012-13) comes from media rights, mostly from a $10.8 billion, 14-year agreement with CBS Sports and Turner Broadcasting for rights to the Division I Men’s Basketball Championship.

Most of the remaining revenue comes from NCAA championships, primarily ticket sales. Is NCAA revenue different from money generated by member conferences and institutions? NCAA.org - The Official Site of the NCAA. Should The NCAA Compensate Athletes For Career-ending Injuries? Marcus Lattimore.

Should The NCAA Compensate Athletes For Career-ending Injuries?

Tyrone Prothro. And now maybe Nick Chubb. If you have followed college football for the past decade, you probably not only recognize these names but also grimace when you read them. Your memory may conjure up images of some of the most gruesome moments ever recorded in the sport. These are young men whose futures were supposed to involve seasons of play on the professional football field, earning millions of dollars and the accolades of fans. Georgia’s Nick Chubb was injured on the first play from scrimmage against Tennessee last Saturday. Author’s Note: I started writing this article last week before Chubb’s injury.

One of the biggest stories so far of this college football season has been the performance of LSU’s Leonard Fournette. First, the facts. Former South Carolina DT Stanley Doughty (via Getty) 6 Must-Follow Money Tips For College Students. Hitha Prabhakar The fall semester is well underway, and it's an exciting time for college freshmen.

6 Must-Follow Money Tips For College Students

Many are navigating a new campus environment, social circles and how to live independently for the first time. Pay for play isn't the answer for college athletics. Sep 12, 2013Scoop JacksonESPN Senior Writer CloseColumnist for ESPN.com and ESPN The Magazine Wrote for Slam, XXL, 6 years with NBA; 4 years with Nike print When Johnny Manziel appeared recently on the cover of Time magazine -- striking his Heisman pose with six simple words, "It's Time To Pay College Athletes" sharing his space -- the most universally agreed, yet universally debated, issue in all of non-professional sports returned to the front of the national discussion.

Pay for play isn't the answer for college athletics