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Scientists Say Child's Play Helps Build A Better Brain : NPR Ed. Deion Jefferson, 10, and Samuel Jefferson, 7, take turns climbing and jumping off a stack of old tires at the Berkeley Adventure Playground in California.

Scientists Say Child's Play Helps Build A Better Brain : NPR Ed

The playground is a half-acre park with a junkyard feel where kids are encouraged to "play wild. " David Gilkey/NPR hide caption itoggle captionDavid Gilkey/NPR Deion Jefferson, 10, and Samuel Jefferson, 7, take turns climbing and jumping off a stack of old tires at the Berkeley Adventure Playground in California.

The playground is a half-acre park with a junkyard feel where kids are encouraged to "play wild. " 5 Simple Office Policies That Make Danish Workers Way More Happy Than Americans. You will often see Denmark listed in surveys as the “happiest country on the planet.

5 Simple Office Policies That Make Danish Workers Way More Happy Than Americans

" Interestingly Danes are not only happy at home, they're also happy at work. According to most studies of worker satisfaction among nations, the happiest employees in the world are in Denmark. The U.S.? Not so much. Here's just one data point: a recent Gallup poll found that 18% of American workers are actively disengaged, meaning they are “emotionally disconnected from their workplaces and less likely to be productive.” Summary Path to a Better Future.pdf. This 14-Year-Old Girl's Already Got Colleges Asking After Her, All Thanks To Her Unexpected Hobby. Are Multiplayer Games the Future of Education? - Melanie Plenda. A new classroom approach tries to bring more competition into the classroom.

Are Multiplayer Games the Future of Education? - Melanie Plenda

It was just supposed to be a quick trip to Beijing, a touristy group thing to take in the sights. It wasn't supposed to go down like this. There wasn't supposed to be a lost manuscript; the travelers weren't supposed to turn on each other. The only good, if any, to be found in this godforsaken quest, this unholy mission, was that by the end of it, they would all know how to speak Mandarin. Why so many kids can’t sit still in school today. The Centers for Disease Control tells us that in recent years there has been a jump in the percentage of young people diagnosed with Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder, commonly known as ADHD: 7.8 percent in 2003 to 9.5 percent in 2007 and to 11 percent in 2011.

Why so many kids can’t sit still in school today

The reasons for the rise are multiple, and include changes in diagnostic criteria, medication treatment and more awareness of the condition. In the following post, Angela Hanscom, a pediatric occupational therapist and the founder of TimberNook, a nature-based development program designed to foster creativity and independent play outdoors in New England, suggests yet another reason more children are being diagnosed with ADHD, whether or not they really have it: the amount of time kids are forced to sit while they are in school.

Can Free Play Prevent Depression and Anxiety In Kids? Over the past 50-60 years, play time in kids’ lives has been drastically cut.

Can Free Play Prevent Depression and Anxiety In Kids?

School days and years are longer and parents often schedule enrichment activities for their children instead of giving them space to direct their own play. Children are rarely given the freedom to direct their own activities, leading to a persistent rise in children feeling that they have no control over their lives. For Students, the Importance of Doing Work That Matters. MartinaK15 By Will Richardson We’re halfway to school when my 14-year-old son remembers a homework assignment he forgot to do for biology class.

For Students, the Importance of Doing Work That Matters

Can Free Play Prevent Depression and Anxiety In Kids? Over the past 50-60 years, play time in kids’ lives has been drastically cut.

Can Free Play Prevent Depression and Anxiety In Kids?

School days and years are longer and parents often schedule enrichment activities for their children instead of giving them space to direct their own play. Children are rarely given the freedom to direct their own activities, leading to a persistent rise in children feeling that they have no control over their lives. And, while correlation doesn’t prove causation, Dr. Peter Gray, who has been studying play for years, says there’s strong evidence that in this case, the decline in play is leading to a rise in depression and acute anxiety among young people.

Check out his TEDx talk for all the details on this fascinating area of research. One third of adults with dyslexia report they were physically abused during their childhood. TORONTO, ON – Adults who have dyslexia are much more likely to report they were physically abused before they turned 18 than their peers without dyslexia, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Toronto and the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in Chapel Hill.

One third of adults with dyslexia report they were physically abused during their childhood

Thirty-five per cent of adults with dyslexia report they were physically abused before they turned 18. In contrast, seven per cent of those without dyslexia reported that they had experienced childhood physical abuse. “Even after accounting for age, race, sex and other early adversities such as parental addictions, childhood physical abuse was still associated with a six-fold increase in the odds of dyslexia” says co-author Esme Fuller-Thomson, professor and Sandra Rotman Endowed Chair at University of Toronto’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work. Heavily Decorated Classrooms Disrupt Attention and Learning In Young Children, According To New Carnegie Mellon Research-Carnegie Mellon News.

Tuesday, May 27, 2014 Contact: Shilo Rea / 412-268-6094 / shilo@cmu.edu PITTSBURGH—Maps, number lines, shapes, artwork and other materials tend to cover elementary classroom walls.

Heavily Decorated Classrooms Disrupt Attention and Learning In Young Children, According To New Carnegie Mellon Research-Carnegie Mellon News

However, new research from Carnegie Mellon University shows that too much of a good thing may end up disrupting attention and learning in young children. Published in Psychological Science, Carnegie Mellon's Anna V. Fisher, Karrie E. I Knew Education Was Important, But This Blew Me Away. Education Week. Embracing a Different Way to Learn | Jonathan M. Brand. During a recent dinner, a Cornell College mathematics faculty member recounted a moment when he knew that our One Course At A Time curriculum --where students take only one course during each of eight different 18-day terms -- was the most powerful way for students to learn.

Embracing a Different Way to Learn | Jonathan M. Brand

A student in his modern algebra class had shared a dream in a voice loud enough to be heard by the entire class. In this dream, mathematics had tied her mother to a tree. This student's attempt at razzing the instructor took an unexpected turn when one-third of the students shared that they too had been having dreams about mathematics and asked what mathematics looked like in her dream. The professor knew then that his class had fully engaged with the materials. The One Course calendar at Cornell College is so immersive that each class truly becomes a part of the student. A Fascinating Way to Put a Stop to the School-to-Prison Pipeline for Black Children. Photo Credit: advprojectdc; Screenshot / YouTube.com April 7, 2014 | Like this article? Join our email list: Stay up to date with the latest headlines via email.

New York Has the Trippiest Reading Exams. Composing tests for eighth-graders may not initially seem like the most creative pursuit, but it is lucrative: A company was paid $32 million dollars to revamp the New York state exams last year, and they've come up with something unexpectedly special (if a bit opaque).

One question on a recent reading exam is confusing kids, teachers, and parents alike, and features a twist on the tortoise and the hare fable including a talking pineapple, magical animals, and a lot of exclamation marks. Here, just give it a shot: The Pineapple and the HareIn the olden times, animals could speak English, just like you and me. There was a lovely enchanted forest that flourished with a bunch of these magical animals. One day, a hare was relaxing by a tree.

The Overprotected Kid. A trio of boys tramps along the length of a wooden fence, back and forth, shouting like carnival barkers. “The Land! It opens in half an hour.” Down a path and across a grassy square, 5-year-old Dylan can hear them through the window of his nana’s front room. He tries to figure out what half an hour is and whether he can wait that long.

The Power of a Mindful Minute in Schools (and at Home) A “bellringer” is a short activity that some teachers put on the board in the beginning of a class so students have something to do while attendance is being taken. Recently, one teacher among a quietly growing group tried something radically different to start his class: a mindfulness practice. What did he notice? Public Libraries Are Better Than Congress, Baseball, and Apple Pie, Say Americans - Robinson Meyer. Every so often, a grave and concerned person will ask (as, in fact, the New York Times asked last year): “Do We Still Need Libraries?” Hasn’t the Internet kind of, you know, ended all that? Aren’t libraries falling behind? Tellingly, the Times could find no one to argue against libraries, and that mirrors American sentiment pretty much exactly. College Home Pages. The Operating Model That Is Eating The World — on management.

He Operating Model That Is Eating The World — on management — Medium. The Worry That Your Unschooler Isn't Learning What He Should Be Learning. Unschoolery. Two decades of work at Yale prove emotions matter in the classroom. The Surprisingly Simple Change That Totally Turned One School Around. Want To Create A Great Education System? Just Do The Opposite Of What America Does. By the Numbers: Dropping Out of High School | Dropout Nation | FRONTLINE. The secret to fixing school discipline problems? Change the behavior of adults « ACEs Too High. My 6th Grade Science Teacher Hated My Guts -- Study Shows Yours Probably Did, Too. Doodling Is Good For Your Noodle. Listening to music in the classroom. 5 Things It Turns Out You Were Right to Hate About School. Effects of Bullying Last Into Adulthood, Study Finds.

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Education Web tools. Huge Education Websites. Education politics. College & careers. Poetry. Positive Discipline. Iphone ipod education apps. Grammar. Study websites. Cal Newport.

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Learning from Wonderful Lives - N. V. K. Baylis. Younglives.com - "How to achieve your goals in life and how to enjoy the journey." Video shows how Walla Walla, WA, high school integrates resilience into school discipline « ACEs Too High. Lincoln High School in Walla Walla, WA, tries new approach to school discipline — expulsions drop 85% « ACEs Too High.