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20 Questions To Guide Inquiry-Based Learning. 20 Questions To Guide Inquiry-Based Learning Recently we took at look at the phases of inquiry-based learning through a framework, and even apps that were conducive to inquiry-based learning on the iPad. During our research for the phases framework, we stumbled across the following breakdown of the inquiry process for learning on 21stcenturyhsie.weebly.com (who offer the references that appear below the graphic).

Most helpfully, it offers 20 questions that can guide student research at any stage, including: What do I want to know about this topic? How do I know I know it? What kinds of resources might help? How do I know the info is valid? These stages have some overlap with self-directed learning. References Cross, M. (1996). Kuhlthau, C., Maniotes, L., & Caspari, A. (2007). Harvard scientists think they might have pinpointed the source of human consciousness.

Human Consciousness Human consciousness has been defined as awareness, sentience, a person’s ability to experience and feel, but despite the important role it plays in our lives and making us who we are, we actually know very little about how consciousness works. Scientists currently believe that consciousness is composed of two components: arousal and awareness. The first is regulated by the brainstem, but the physical origins of the latter were always a mystery. Now, a team of researchers at Harvard think they may have discovered the regions of the brain that work with the brainstem to maintain consciousness. “For the first time, we have found a connection between the brainstem region involved in arousal and regions involved in awareness, two prerequisites for consciousness,” said Michael D. To better understand why some patients were able to maintain consciousness despite injuries while others went into comas, the researchers analyzed 36 patients with brainstem lesions.

How to Find Something You Would Die for, and Live for It – Medium. ✍️ by Peter Diamandis This post is about achieving “significance” during exponential times. Significance is the feeling that your life (and your work) has had a meaningful and lasting impact. And today, during these exponential times, that impact can be greater than any time in history. Significance Over Success — Choosing Your Target Too many people spend their whole life on a treadmill striving for financial success and/or fame. People often take a job or start a company because they think it’s a quick way to get rich or get noticed, i.e. to be successful. Throughout my career, whenever I’ve started a company just to make money, it’s been a mistake. On the flip side, when I start a company to solve a problem truly important to me, one that excites me, even if the solution takes 10 years, every one of those 10 years are well spent — educational and fulfilling. When given a choice to prioritize significance (meaningfulness) over success (financial or otherwise), take it.

Identifying Your Target. Outsmart Your Own Biases. Suppose you’re evaluating a job candidate to lead a new office in a different country. On paper this is by far the most qualified person you’ve seen. Her responses to your interview questions are flawless. She has impeccable social skills. Still, something doesn’t feel right. You can’t put your finger on what—you just have a sense. How do you decide whether to hire her? You might trust your intuition, which has guided you well in the past, and send her on her way. It can be dangerous to rely too heavily on what experts call System 1 thinking—automatic judgments that stem from associations stored in memory—instead of logically working through the information that’s available.

We are all susceptible to such biases, especially when we’re fatigued, stressed, or multitasking. Most of us tend to be overconfident in our estimates. One solution is to delegate and to fight bias at the organizational level, using choice architecture to modify the environment in which decisions are made.