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Tropical Fish Articles. Angelfish Genetics - Types of angelfish. By: Nic Paquette Thanks in large part to Dr.

Angelfish Genetics - Types of angelfish

Joanne Norton much is known about the genetics of angelfish. Dr Norton’s work, published between May 1982 and March 1994 in Freshwater and Marine Aquarium magazine, still stands as the cornerstone of what we know today. Similar to the genetics of all vertebrate organisms angelfish carry two copies of each gene, one which is inherited maternally, one which is inherited paternally.

Mutations in various genes lead to interesting and unique color and pattering which, through selective breeding, have generated a number of beautiful angelfish phenotypes. Angelfish Genetics In order to keep things organized angelfish genetics has been standardized to a large degree. Descriptions Below are descriptions for the currently described (and classified) single gene angelfish phenotypes, as well as a few of the more common multiple gene phenotypes.

Marble (M/M, M/g, M/Gm): Marble angelfish show a black and white marbled patterning. Types of Bettas, by colour, tailss, patterns and genetics. Steel Blue is also sometimes called Metallic Blue.

Types of Bettas, by colour, tailss, patterns and genetics.

This colour has a metallic iridescence when compared to the Royal Blue Betta. Steel Blue results from the allele combination blbl. Steel Blue, Green, Royal Blue, Green and Turquoise Bettas have an interesting genetic inheritance pattern based on the Bl / bl alleles that show incomplete dominance and determine iridescence. Crossings: Steel Blue x Steel Blue gives100% Steel Blue off-spring; Green x Green gives100% Green; Green x Steel Blue gives all Royal Blue; Royal Blue x Royal Blue gives 50% Royal, 25% Steel, 25% Green; Green x Royal Blue gives 50% Royal, 50% Green.

Steel Blue x Royal Blue gives 50% Royal, 50% Steel Blue Turquoise is a variation of the "green" colouring (BlBl alleles). Siamese Fighter (Betta Splendens) Siamese fighters are individualists; there's no other aquarium fish fairly like them.

Siamese Fighter (Betta Splendens)

Nearly every aquarist possesses a minimum of one male, even if he has no intention of breeding. The extraordinary beauty of the Siamese fighter is sufficient to warrant it a place of honour in any community tank. The male, when fully grown, develops a long flowing anal fin, a high dorsal fin, along with a big flowing rounded tail. An additional characteristic feature is the spear-shaped ventrals which are thrust forward in a menacing manner when the fish are angry. You are able to only really appreciate the beauty of this species when it is angry. 'Cornflower blue' and 'fiery red' are the two main colours, but there are numerous colour variations in blue, green, and red, all with a metallic tint which is heightened when the fish is annoyed. It is advisable to have only one male in a tank containing other fish, and if the tank is particu-larly big you might also add a female. Types of Bettas, by colour, tailss, patterns and genetics. Steel Blue is also sometimes called Metallic Blue.

Types of Bettas, by colour, tailss, patterns and genetics.

This colour has a metallic iridescence when compared to the Royal Blue Betta. Steel Blue results from the allele combination blbl. Steel Blue, Green, Royal Blue, Green and Turquoise Bettas have an interesting genetic inheritance pattern based on the Bl / bl alleles that show incomplete dominance and determine iridescence. Crossings: Steel Blue x Steel Blue gives100% Steel Blue off-spring; Green x Green gives100% Green; Green x Steel Blue gives all Royal Blue; Royal Blue x Royal Blue gives 50% Royal, 25% Steel, 25% Green; Green x Royal Blue gives 50% Royal, 50% Green. Steel Blue x Royal Blue gives 50% Royal, 50% Steel Blue Turquoise is a variation of the "green" colouring (BlBl alleles).

Siamese fighting fish. The Siamese fighting fish, also sometimes colloquially known as the betta (Betta splendens), is a species of gourami which is extremely popular as an aquarium fish.

Siamese fighting fish

This species is native to the Mekong basin of Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam, where it can be found in standing waters of canals, rice paddies, and floodplains.[2] They are called pla-kad (biting fish) in Thai or trey krem in Khmer. They tend to be rather aggressive. Description B. splendens usually grows to a length of about 6.5 cm (2.6 in).[2] Although aquarium specimens are known for their brilliant colors and large, flowing fins, the natural coloration of B. splendens is a dull green, browns, and gray, and the fins of wild specimens are relatively short. Diet Siamese fighting fish have upturned mouths and are primarily carnivorous surface feeders, although some vegetable matter may be eaten. Reproduction and early development A pair spawning under a bubble nest in a breeder's tank History Aquarium keeping Diet Varieties.

Siamese Fighting Fish Care And Forum. All pictures were provided by Laura M.

Siamese Fighting Fish Care And Forum

Schlögl. Brief description This page offers information and tips on raising Siamese fighting fish - from diet to raising the fry. , so share your story at the bottom of this page, please! Since we also have other pages devoted to more specific issues related to housing this beautiful species, you should too: Siamese fighting fish - Betta splendens profile with large forum , FAQ on raising Bettas , Diseases of Siamese fighting fish, with recommended treatment and 10 tips for a successful Betta splendens reproduction (VERY POPULAR ARTICLE) . Introduction Siamese Fighting Fish are one of the most popular and beautiful aquarium fish available.

Sponsored links The name Siamese Fighting Fish came from when they were first used by gamblers in the Far East. Origin Siamese Fighting Fish originate from the paddy fields, gullies and streams of South East Asia, and are found mainly in Thailand, Borneo and South Vietnam. Aquarium Temperament and breeding Mating Cheers. Rummy-nose tetra. The rummy-nose tetra, Hemigrammus rhodostomus, is a species of tropical freshwater characin fish originating in South America, popular among fishkeepers as an aquarium fish.

Rummy-nose tetra

One of many small tetras belonging to the same genus, it is a 5 cm (2 in) long fish when fully grown, and is a long established favourite among tropical fishkeepers. The fish is one of several very similar species including Hemigrammus bleheri, and Petitella georgiae, and it is possible that more recently collected specimens available in the aquarium trade are members of one or other of these similar species. The common name applied to most of these fishes is "rummy-nose tetra", though other common names are in circulation (such as "firehead tetra" for H. bleheri, according to FishBase).

Physical description[edit] Male and female individuals exhibit no obvious visual differences, other than increased fullness of the body outline in ripe females. Distribution[edit] Hemigrammus bleheri Habitat[edit] Reproduction[edit] Red Nose Tetra (Hemigrammus Rhodostomus) Red nose tetras are peaceful but delicate fish that attain a length of about 1.5 inch at maturity.

Red Nose Tetra (Hemigrammus Rhodostomus)

The nose and forehead is deep red, and also the body silvery tending to olive on the back with a light yellow on the belly. A dark stripe runs down the side of the body increasing in width as it extends into the tail. The tail has a dark angular mark on every lobe. Spawning might be encouraged in soft water at a temperature of 80°F, and pH 6-8, otherwise it breeds in the standard manner. The red nose tetra isn't an simple species to breed even though it might well be worth a try. Serpae tetra. Serpae tetras are one species of the genus Hyphessobrycon, and are now known as Hyphessobrycon eques.

Serpae tetra

These South American tropical characids are popular aquarium fishes, often identified as "red minor tetras". They are found in the wild in the Madeira and Guaporé regions of the Amazon River, and in upper Paraguay. In the aquarium[edit] A long-finned variety of H. eques Serpae tetras prefer water temperatures ranging from 72-79°F (22-26°C). If any aggression is seen in the fish, it is usually among conspecifics, especially if they are kept in large groups where they can establish a pecking order (a behavior similar to Puntius tetrazona). Breeding[edit] Breeding, as with most other tetras, can be difficult due to the few obvious differences between the genders. The average lifespan for a serpae tetra is about seven years. See also[edit] List of freshwater aquarium fish species References[edit] H. External links[edit] Marbled Hatchetfish Care And Profile - Carnegiella Strigata.

Food The Marbled Hatchet fish eats a variety of live foods including mosquito larvae, brine shrimp and bloodworms.

Marbled Hatchetfish Care And Profile - Carnegiella Strigata

Sexing There are no differences between males and females unless the females are heavy with eggs. The eggs are visible through her thin body. Breeding These egg layers are not easily bred in the aquarium, but if there is successful spawning the adults should be removed soon after the eggs are laid. Lifespan The Marbled Hatchet will live for up to 5 years. Origin Carnegiella strigata can be found in the Amazon River of South America. Description The Marbled Hatchet is one of the easiest hatchet fish to take care of. Pictures Bought by aqua-fish.net from jjphoto.dk. Cardinal tetra. The cardinal tetra is a very popular aquarium fish, but is less widespread than the neon tetra because until recently, it was difficult to breed in captivity.

However, many breeders are now producing the fish; in most cases one can determine if the cardinal tetra is bred or wild-caught due to damaged fins on wild caught specimens. Normally, aquarists prefer to buy tank-bred fish, but some Brazilian ichthyologists believe fishkeepers should continue to support the sustainable cardinal fishery of the Amazon basin, since thousands of people are employed in the region to capture fish for the aquarium trade.

If those fishermen lost their livelihoods catching cardinals and other tropical fish, they might turn their attention to engaging in deforestation. The fish might also be effectively an annual species with a lifespan of just a single year in nature. It lives for several years in captivity. Aquarium maintenance[edit] A shoal of cardinal tetras in an aquarium Breeding[edit] Development[edit] Pterophyllum. Pterophyllum scalare, the species most commonly referred to as angelfish or freshwater angelfish, is the most common species of Pterophyllum held in captivity. It is native to the Amazon Basin in Peru, Colombia, and Brazil, particularly the Ucayali, Solimões and Amazon rivers, as well as the rivers of Amapá in Brazil, the Oyapock River in French Guiana and the Essequibo River in Guyana. It is found in swamps or flooded grounds where vegetation is dense and the water is either clear or silty.

Its native water conditions range from a pH of 6.0 to 8.0, a water hardness range of 5 - 13 dH, and water temperature ranging from 24 to 30 °C (75 to 86 °F).[1] This is the species of angelfish most frequently found in the aquarium trade. A similar (cross-breeding possible) P.scalare exist in the Orinocco. They are of same size and shape, the only difference are its stripes. As aquarium fish inbreeding is a problem with this fish. References[edit] External links[edit] Photograph. Think Fish - Article: Angelfish. Fish Profile for Angelfish, Angel Fish (Pterophyllum scalare, Platax scalaris, Plataxoides dumerilii, Pterophyllum altum, Pterophyllum dumerilii, Pterophyllum eimekei, Pterophyllum scalare, Zeus scalaris) Photo of: Angelfish (Pterophyllum scalare) Scientific Name(s): Pterophyllum scalare, Platax scalaris, Plataxoides dumerilii, Pterophyllum altum, Pterophyllum dumerilii, Pterophyllum eimekei, Pterophyllum scalare, Zeus scalaris Common Name(s): Angelfish, Angel Fish Family: Cichlidae Species Type: South American Cichlids Maximum Size: 6 inches Life Span: 12 years Natural Habitat: South American Swamps and Rivers Minimum Tank Size: 50 gallons Tank Region: All over Possible Tank Mates: Community fish that are not small enought to fit in an angelfish's mouth.

Description: The unique shape of the Angelfish makes it one of the most recognizable freswater aquarium fish in the world. Breeding Information: Use pH of 7.0 and a higher temperature of 85°F. Sexing Information: Very hard to tell. Diet: Carnivorous - Does well with flake or pellet foods supplimented with blood worms and brine shrimp. Temperament: Generally peaceful but may eat small tankmates. This Angelfish profile has been viewed 3803 times. Types of Angelfish: The Many Freshwater Angelfish Varieties. There are dozens of freshwater angelfish varieties. All are the scalare angelfish species (Pterophyllum scalare) but have different color patterns and tail lengths. It’s important to note that many may not show their true coloring until they become adults. Something to keep in mind when selecting your young angelfish. Also, because producing unnatural colorings and patterns produces fish that would not survive in the wild and inbreeding may be involved in producing some of these varieties, some freshwater angelfish varieties are inherently less healthy than others.

Often the more genetic mutations involved, the less healthy the fish may be. Read What are Freshwater Angelfish Varieties? Half Black Veil Angelfish Veil Angelfish Veil angelfish may be the oldest known types of angelfish and are commonly found. Marble Angelfish This may be one of the most commonly found angelfish in fish stores. Albino Angelfish Albinos lack the black pigments. Gold Angelfish Black Lace Angelfish Black Angelfish. Angelfish - Tropical - Aquatic Fish - Tropicalfish-Scotland. Pterophyllum scalare - The Free Freshwater and Saltwater Aquarium Encyclopedia Anyone Can Edit - The Aquarium Wiki. From The Aquarium Wiki Freshwater Angelfish at the Montreal Biodome - Wild Type 113.562 liters 113,562.353 mL 113.6 Litres (30 US G.) 20.32 cm 15.2-20.3cm (6-8 ") This animal is available captive bred Additional names Angels, Angelfish Additional scientific names Platax scalaris, Plataxoides dumerilii, Pterophillum eimekei, Pterophyllum dumerilii, Pterophyllum eimekei, Zeus scalaris Origin Found throughout the Amazon River Basin, in Peru, Colombia, and Brazil, along the Ucayali, Solimões and Amazon rivers; rivers of Amapá (Brazil), Rio Oyapock in French Guiana; Essequibo River in Guyana.[1] Sexing Extremely difficult.

Tank compatibility Compatible with some South American Cichlids such as the German Blue Ram or any of the Apistogramma species. Diet Angels will accept most foods include live/frozen such as brine shrimp and good quality cichlid pellets. Feeding regime Feed once or twice a day. Environment Specifics This fish likes an area of substrate to sift through while looking for food. Behaviour. Red rainbowfish. Guppy. Poecilia velifera. Amano Shrimp .:. Caridina multidentata .:. Freshwater Aquarium Shrimp Species Information Page.

Ram cichlid. Panaque nigrolineatus. Rineloricaria sp. (L010A) Hemiancistrus sp. (L128) Sailfin molly. Sailfin Molly (Mollynisia Latipinna) Poecilia sphenops. Southern platyfish. Platy Variatus (Platypaecilus Variatus) Variatus platy. Panda garra, Garra flavatra. Panda Garra (Garra flavatra) - Seriously Fish. Tropical Fish Finder.co.uk - The ultimate UK fish keeping resource for all types of tropical and marine fish, including fish books, articles, fish shops, fish clubs and more. Ancistrus.