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Roman Comedy

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Greek and Roman Comedy. CLOSE as Aeschylus, with his dominating chorus, sometimes seems to the earlier rustic lyric, Aristophanes is even closer.

Greek and Roman Comedy

His work is often so formless, his story sometimes so disconnected, his plot so carelessly put together, as to force us to the conclusion that the Greeks had not yet perceived the need in the comic drama for that unity which is so striking a characteristic of their greater tragedies. Owing to this slowness of the Greeks in evolving a type of pure comedy, as they had already evolved a type of pure tragedy, the works of Aristophanes impress us with their strangeness and their inequality. Aristophanes himself, as we see him in his plays, appears to us in three aspects, each of which is seemingly incompatible with either of the others. First of all, he is indisputably one of the loftiest lyric poets of Greece, with a surpassing strength of wing for his imaginative flights, and with a surprising sweep of vision when he soars on high. Ancient Roman Theaters. Ancient Roman Theaters Roman theatres derive their basic design from the Theatre of Pompey, the first permanent Roman theatre.

Ancient Roman Theaters

The characteristics of Roman to those of the earlier Greek theatres due in large part to its influence on the Roman triumvir Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus. Much of the architectural influence on the Romans came from the Greeks, and theatre structural design was no different from other buildings. However, Roman theatres have specific differences, such as being built upon their own foundations instead of earthen works or a hillside and being completely enclosed on all sides. The Roman theatre was shaped with a half circle or orchestra space in front of the stage. The Romans built theaters anywhere, even on flat plains, by raising the whole structure off the ground. The huge amount of people present still held problems for the sound as the audience would not always stay quiet. Rows of seats were added for honored guests. Standard Floor Plan Theatre Structure ShareThis. Roman theatre (structure) Roman theatre at Amman, Jordan Roman theaters derive from and are part of the overall evolution of earlier Greek theaters.

Roman theatre (structure)

Indeed, much of the architectural influence on the Romans came from the Greeks, and theatre structural design was no different from other buildings. However, Roman theatres have specific differences, such as being built upon their own foundations instead of earthen works or a hillside and being completely enclosed on all sides. Roman theatres were built in all areas of the empire from Spain to the Middle East. Because of the Romans' ability to influence local architecture, we see numerous theatres around the world with uniquely Roman attributes.[1] There exist similarities between the theatres and amphitheatres of ancient Rome/Italy.

These buildings were semi-circular and possessed certain inherent architectural structures, with minor differences depending on the region in which they were constructed. An Introduction to Plautus and Roman Comedy Article. An Introduction to Plautus and Roman Comedy Questions. 414 Roman Comedy I (Plautus), Classical Drama and Theatre. ©Damen, 2012 Classical Drama and Society Chapter 14: Roman Comedy, Part 1 (Plautus) I.

414 Roman Comedy I (Plautus), Classical Drama and Theatre

Introduction: Early Roman Literary Drama (derived from the Greeks) The turning point in Roman drama came in 240 BCE, when a Greek-speaking slave living in Rome, Livius Andronicus, translated Homer's Odyssey into Latin. A freed slave, we are told, Livius Andronicus served in the house of the Livii, a noble family of Rome, from whom he took his name. It's a fair question to ask why he did not write his own original works—indeed, the same could be posed for every Roman playwright whose works survive—and the answer must be that he considered it wasted effort to till a field when the world doled out free grain. A more compelling question concerning the originality of Roman drama revolves around why the Roman public sought out Greek drama so avidly. But plays written for the amusement of Athenians did not necessarily carry over to other countries and cultures wholesale.

II. A. B. C. 413 Roman Theatre, Classical Drama and Theatre. ©Damen, 2012 Classical Drama and Society Chapter 13: Early Roman Drama and Theatre I.

413 Roman Theatre, Classical Drama and Theatre

Introduction: An Overview of Roman Drama As Rome begins and ends with Romuli, so its drama and theatre also come full circle across the ages. 1) an early period (pre-240 BCE) when native Italian drama, such as Atellan farces, phlyaces and Fescennine verses, dominated the Roman stage; 2) the period of literary drama (240 BCE - ca. 100 BCE), when the Romans primarily adapted classical and post-classical Greek plays; 3) the renaissance of popular entertainment (ca. 100 BCE - 476 CE), when traditional Roman fare like circuses, spectacles and mime returned to the forefront of the entertainment scene. The third phase is far and away the longest, encompassing all of Roman history from its highest point in the first century BCE to the civilization's so-called "Decline and Fall" in the fifth century CE.

II. More concrete data are found in other sources, especially archaeological data. III. A. B. C. Roman Comedy.