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Spiritualité / Philosophie / Psychologie

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10 years later, David Foster Wallace’s commencement address at Kenyon College is as relevant as ever — Quartz. Delivered to the graduating class of 2005 at Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio; May 21 2005: There are these two young fish swimming along and they happen to meet an older fish swimming the other way, who nods at them and says “Morning, boys.

10 years later, David Foster Wallace’s commencement address at Kenyon College is as relevant as ever — Quartz

How’s the water?” And the two young fish swim on for a bit, and then eventually one of them looks over at the other and goes “What the hell is water?” This is a standard requirement of US commencement speeches, the deployment of didactic little parable-ish stories. The thing turns out to be one of the better, less bullshitty conventions of the genre, but if you’re worried that I plan to present myself here as the wise, older fish explaining what water is to you younger fish, please don’t be. Of course the main requirement of speeches like this is that I’m supposed to talk about your liberal arts education’s meaning, to try to explain why the degree you are about to receive has actual human value instead of just a material payoff.

Amour

Ivy League Schools Are Overrated. Send Your Kids Elsewhere. These enviable youngsters appear to be the winners in the race we have made of childhood.

Ivy League Schools Are Overrated. Send Your Kids Elsewhere.

But the reality is very different, as I have witnessed in many of my own students and heard from the hundreds of young people whom I have spoken with on campuses or who have written to me over the last few years. Our system of elite education manufactures young people who are smart and talented and driven, yes, but also anxious, timid, and lost, with little intellectual curiosity and a stunted sense of purpose: trapped in a bubble of privilege, heading meekly in the same direction, great at what they’re doing but with no idea why they’re doing it.

I should say that this subject is very personal for me. Like so many kids today, I went off to college like a sleepwalker. You chose the most prestigious place that let you in; up ahead were vaguely understood objectives: status, wealth—“success.” A young woman from another school wrote me this about her boyfriend at Yale: William Deresiewicz on the Ivy League, Mental Illness, and the Meaning of Life. The former Yale English professor William Deresiewicz stirred up quite a storm earlier this month with his New Republic essay “Don’t Send Your Kid to the Ivy League”—a damning critique of the nation’s most revered and wealthy educational institutions, and the flawed meritocracy they represent.

William Deresiewicz on the Ivy League, Mental Illness, and the Meaning of Life

He takes these arguments even further in his upcoming book, Excellent Sheep: The Miseducation of the American Elite and the Way to a Meaningful Life. Part cultural commentary, part philosophical treatise on the meaning of education itself, the book reads like a self-help manual for ambitious yet internally adrift adolescents struggling to figure out how to navigate the college system, and ultimately their own lives. A Harvard philosopher’s argument for not loving yourself just as you are — Quartz. Two things typically happen when Donald Trump speaks in public: Either he lies, or it becomes clear to everyone that he literally has no idea what he is talking about.

A Harvard philosopher’s argument for not loving yourself just as you are — Quartz

Yet he seems to possess the ability to spread ignorance without facing consequences. For proof, we need only look at Trump’s blatant misogyny. As with other topics, Trump’s opinions on sexual assault–which include alleging that all Mexican immigrants are rapists, blaming rape in the military on the presence of women, defending Mike Tyson, or just using inept metaphors–are deeply misguided and misleading. Meanwhile, a recent The New York Times article detailing decades of Trump’s sexist behavior towards women cited dozens of examples described in anodyne terms as “unwelcome romantic advances, unending commentary on the female form… and unsettling workplace conduct.”

Women are undoubtedly reacting to Trump’s unrepentant and explicit misogyny. Women hate Trump because he rubs our faces in just how little people care. Le concept d'émergence - PHILOSOPHIE, SCIENCE ET SOCIETE. Le concept d'émergence est sujet à controverses.

Le concept d'émergence - PHILOSOPHIE, SCIENCE ET SOCIETE

Il est employé dans des acceptions diverses, dont certaines sont floues, et à des occasions sans commune mesure les unes avec les autres. Il est aussi dénoncé comme obscur et sans fondement par une partie de la communauté scientifique. Pourtant, c'est un concept intéressant et porteur d'avenir, car il permet une conception diversifiée du monde. Son adoption pourrait conduire à un changement de paradigme à la fois sur le plan philosophique et sur le plan scientifique. JUIGNET Patrick. 1/ L'origine du concept2/ La définition adoptée3/ Les concepts associés4/ Discussion5/ Conclusion 1/ L'origine du concept L'origine du concept peut être ramenée à John Stuart Mill qui, dans A system of logic (1862), considère que, pour le vivant, la juxtaposition et l'interaction des parties constitutives ne suffit pas à expliquer les propriétés constatées.

En 1925, C.D. Robert Waldinger: Qu'est-ce qui fait une vie réussie ? Leçons de la plus longue étude sur le bonheur.