background preloader

MakerSpace

Facebook Twitter

Artificial intelligence, robotics and coding - Teacher. Can computers think? What is intelligence? Can we build a robot that learns from its past experiences? These are some of the tricky questions Year 6 students have been tackling as they explore the role of robots and machine technology in society while learning to code. The exciting units of work for this year’s robotics program at Ravenswood School for Girls in Sydney have been developed through a CSIRO STEM Professionals in Schools partnership, which pairs classroom teachers with experts working in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) industries. Matthew Scadding, ICT Integrator and TAS teacher has been working with Dr Joshua Ho, Head of the Bioinformatics and Systems Medicine Laboratory at the Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute and senior lecturer at the University of New South Wales. ‘We’ve been registered with the [CSIRO] program for a few years now and we’ve worked with multiple STEM specialists,’ Scadding tells Teacher.

STEM learning – international best practice | Online publication for school educators | ACER. Queensland science teacher Sarah Chapman is passionate about engaging youngsters in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) education and has travelled the world gathering evidence of international best practice. It’s a research journey that’s taken her to Singapore, Finland, the United Kingdom, United States and New Zealand, visiting schools, businesses, tertiary institutions, STEM outreach programs, peak bodies and government departments.

‘The idea was to gain expertise and best practice across the whole STEM ecosystem, not just in schools,’ Chapman tells Teacher. The Head of Science at Townsville State High School embarked on the trip after being awarded a 2016 Barbara Cail STEM Fellowship. Chapman and fellow award recipient Dr Rebecca Vivian, from the University of Adelaide, spent six weeks overseas. It details key findings in several stakeholder areas, including: peak organisations; STEM industry; and early childhood, primary and secondary education. STEM learning – international best practice | Online publication for school educators | ACER. Full STEAM Ahead: Why Arts Are Essential in a STEM Education. In December of 2015, Old Navy was caught up in a controversy over a tee shirt design in which the word "Artist" was crossed out and replaced with either "Astronaut" or "President. " The internet was full of artists and scientists sharing their stories about how art was actually an important part of their lives.

There was even a photo of former President George Bush, now an aspiring artist, making its rounds. In fact, NASA even has a page dedicated to astronauts turned artists. An Obvious Connection In 2006, Georgette Yakman, a graduate student at Virginia Polytechnic and State University, developed a framework that took the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) acronym one step further. Her STEAM framework incorporated the arts into the traditional STEM curricular areas.

Yakman, who holds a BS in Clothing and Textiles, has also worked as a middle and high school engineering and technology teacher and was named NCTC's STEM Teacher of the Year in 2009. Where's the Art? From concept to classroom – STEM research | Online publication for school educators | ACER. Throughout August, Teacher is exploring the theme of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) learning.

Today’s article shares a review of evidence-based practice for primary STEM teaching. While the need for STEM-related expertise in the workforce is growing, the number of students choosing STEM subjects at secondary and tertiary level in Australia is stagnating. Although decisions about future pathways are made later on in a student’s school career, teachers in the primary years have an important role to play. A new review offers practical ideas for primary STEM teaching. ‘STEM education can begin from the earliest years and fundamental STEM skills should be established in primary school.

The review has been released by the Translational Research project – an Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) initiative designed to help teachers apply research in the classroom to improve learning. STEM education themes and key messages ‘E’ is for Engineering. Where the jobs will be in 2030: new report. Rachel Lilley is teaching children how to prepare for an uncertain jobs future. The curriculum she teaches at Regents Park Christian School in Sydney is one she developed to teach students website development skills, computer coding and research skills. But the course doesn't stop there. The children are also being taught problem solving and communication skills, which new research suggests will be vital for their economic survival in the future.

Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Teaching the code for tomorrow Matthew Leveson's boyfriend given immunity Seaplane terminal commemorates aviation history Sandstone landmark to open to public Election loser must compromise: US Consul General How much oregano is in your 'oregano'? 2GB's 100th consecutive ratings win Students at Regent's Park Christian School are being trained in IT skills for the jobs of the future. Automation is expected to replace a high proportion of jobs and low-skill entry-level jobs have also become more scarce.

The jobs we did last Census. Teaching Design Thinking: Units and Advice from Educators | Rubicon. By Kelby Zenor, Rubicon International Teaching kids to think is a fun but challenging topic. Students need to be able to take in ideas, process them, and then distill them into new ideas. However, how students learn to think can be vastly different, and unique to the person teaching them. This idea spurred us to look for “how” teachers get students to think, broaden their scope of understanding, and problem solve. We were amazed at the diverse inclusion of the Design Thinking Process into units of instruction. Some of us might remember that groundbreaking Nightline episode (I am dating myself with this reference, aren’t I?) Below, we asked a few teachers to share how they have brought Design Thinking into their courses. Edutopia. After watching a room of students working and learning via a maker project, one can't help but be awed by the level of engagement.

There's a low hum as students buzz around, helping one another troubleshoot problems and figure out next steps. They suggest improvements and model skills for one another. Groups are working on distinctly different projects; some are engaged with wood and electronics, while others are programming, sewing, and drawing. Yet despite the wide variety, they're all so focused that a classroom visitor attracts nary a glance. Maker education is being increasingly integrated into classrooms of all grade levels. Traditional direct instruction focuses on content knowledge, while maker-centered learning orients around the learner's context. Anyone who works with young makers sees this level of engagement, collaboration, and creativity. 1. We don’t know this definitively -- yet. 2. Maker-centered learning is not a one-size-fits-all curriculum. 3.

Digital Portfolios. Science Week – Drones, Droids and Robots. It’s called National Science Week but this year’s theme for schools focuses on the T in STEM – Technology – with educators and students encouraged to explore Drones, Droids and Robots. The ‘toy’ versions of the tech are becoming increasingly popular but the 2016 theme centres on the real-world application of autonomous technology in areas such as agriculture, mining and space exploration. Australian Science Teachers’ Association (ASTA) President Anne Disney says this year’s theme will take schools on ‘a fascinating journey between science fiction and science fact’.

Resources to support teachers ASTA has produced a free resource book for teachers. It says the aim of the digital book is to provide ‘educators and their students a glimpse into the real, fast-paced world of autonomous technology research and devices. How schools are celebrating National Science Week This year, 248 Australian schools have been awarded ASTA grants to support National Science Week events. Untitled. The Boeing Company has teamed up with Teaching Channel to create 10 Science and Innovation curriculum modules as part of the company’s 100th anniversary, which is being celebrated for the next 100 days. The modules, which were originally designed by teachers paired with Boeing engineers, have undergone multiple stages of revision designed to adapt them to better meet the goals of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). An iterative process is necessary as teachers, school leaders, and coaches work to realize the vision for science teaching and learning that the authors of the Framework for K-12 Science Education and the NGSS imagined.

The first, and perhaps most important, step in this process is for educators to better understand the shifts in teaching and learning called for in the NGSS. This can be accomplished by: Developing new materials is a productive and effective way to engage students in three dimensional learning. Phase 1: The Engineering Challenge Figure 1. Figure 2. How art is drawing students to STEM. To address the decline in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) participation in secondary and tertiary schools, experts are turning to innovative approaches to engage students in their science lessons. Russell Tytler, Professor of Science Education at Deakin University, will be speaking at next month’s Research Conference 2016 about how the art of drawing is a key activity to helping students engage with science.

‘If we are to engage students with thinking/reasoning and working scientifically, we need to align classroom practices more authentically with the knowledge building, or epistemic practices of science,’ Tytler tells Research Developments ahead of the event. ‘The science that students engage with should demonstrate the nature of science as it works in the world. Because science is so often visual and spatial in nature, drawing is a key activity, alongside modelling, role-play and digital simulation.’ ACARA - Information materials. Focusing on the process, not just the product. In 2015 Teacher brought you news of how one school is using a digital fabrication lab to engage girls in Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts and Maths (STEAM). One year on, Editor Jo Earp catches up with Principal Susan Just to reflect on the benefits and ongoing challenges. It’s the end of another exciting visit to the digital fabrication laboratory for Year 7 students at Melbourne’s Lauriston Girls’ School as they work with US educator and ‘tinkerer in residence’ Jaymes Dec to design and make magic lanterns.

Principal Susan Just says the youngsters agree that the lanterns are ‘very cool’ – combining everyday objects with computer programs and electronic circuitry – but the real benefit of the FabLab projects can be found in the process, rather than the end product. ‘[It’s] the design thinking process, the process of making, the process of problem-solving. It’s those skills that you can actually transfer to any aspect of a career.

18 STEM Activity Ideas, Resources to Promote Summer Learning. Resources: The STEM Programme Index. There's a growing smorgasbord of initiatives and resources beyond the classroom supporting the push to improve STEM learning outcomes, so finding one to fit your students' needs at any given moment in time can feel a little overwhelming. In an attempt to make things easier for educators, the first national STEM Programme Index has just been released. SPI 2016 brings together information on more than 250 Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics opportunities available to schools and students. It is available via this link, or you can download a PDF copy at the foot of this article.

The guide is a joint initiative of the Office of the Chief Scientist and peak association the Australian Industry Group (AIG). The listings include in-school programs, university enrichment, after-school clubs, mentoring schemes and excursions. They've been compiled from publicly available information and consultations carried out up to January 2016. Edutopia. Full STEAM Ahead: Why Arts Are Essential in a STEM Education. In December of last year, Old Navy was caught up in a controversy over a tee shirt design in which the word "Artist" was crossed out and replaced with either "Astronaut" or "President. " The internet was full of artists and scientists sharing their stories about how art was actually an important part of their lives.

There was even a photo of former President George Bush, now an aspiring artist, making its rounds. In fact, NASA even has a page dedicated to astronauts turned artists. An Obvious Connection In 2006, Georgette Yakman, a graduate student at Virginia Polytechnic and State University, developed a framework that took the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) acronym one step further.

Her STEAM framework incorporated the arts into the traditional STEM curricular areas. The connection is also obvious for anyone who has ever worked in any traditional STEM career. Where's the Art? If we are teaching STEM, we are also inherently teaching the arts. STEAM + Project-Based Learning: Real Solutions From Driving Questions.

Ronnie: Boys and girls, what is inside of this bag? Air. You are going to see convection at its best. Natasha: Now that we are a STEAM school, using project based learning as our primary instructional strategy, we see our students succeeding at the highest levels. They're interested in what's happening in the world. They're interested in their own learning and how they're going to apply that. Ronnie: So here at Charles Drew Charter School, we are a STEAM school, with the emphasis on science, technology, engineering, the arts and math. Our kids not only get the regular curriculum, but they also have classes like science lab with me, robotics, engineering, art, chorus, band.

Teacher: This is called a? Children: Flute. Teacher: Flute. Sayj: I'm taking dance and orchestra right now. Joshua: I like technology too. Adia: I love science, and I like to learn about how things work. Donya: Well, for us, project based learning and STEAM can't really be separated. Abigail: My students researched the event. Resources and Downloads for STEM. Maker Education: Reaching All Learners. Overview Engaging All Learners Albemarle County Public Schools spans 726 square miles, educating 13,700 students among 26 schools -- including two public charter schools. The district consists of high-poverty to middle-class schools, rural, suburban, and demographically diverse urban schools -- including one where over 60 languages are spoken.

"We serve children from age four, all the way up to our post-high students, who are our most handicapped students that stay with us until they are 21," says Superintendent Pam Moran. "We want all of our learners to embrace learning, to excel, and to own their future. " Reaching all students through student-driven learning is Albemarle's vision. How It's Done Connect Maker Ed to Your Curriculum Maker projects can be created to support just about any subject area, from science to history to language arts.

When planning a maker project, Albemarle teachers consider these questions: What do I want my students to learn? Create a Maker Project Resources. Middle School Maker Journey: Top 20 Technologies and Tools. Bringing Engineering Design To The Classroom. Helping Students Become Designers: Agency By Design. Introducing: MakerBot In the Classroom. What Is Making When It Comes To Education and Schools? Edutopia. Edutopia. Edutopia. Edutopia. Reinventing the classroom for the digital age | Teacher | ACER.