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Week Four Mobile Learning in the Classroom

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E-Rate Program - Discounted Telecommunications Services. The Universal Service Administrative Company (USAC) is an independent, not-for-profit corporation created in 1997 to collect universal service contributions from telecommunications carriers and administer universal support mechanisms (programs) designed to help communities across the country secure access to affordable telecommunications services.

E-Rate Program - Discounted Telecommunications Services

USAC carries out its functions as the administrator of the federal universal service programs and Universal Service Fund (USF) under the oversight of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). USAC administers universal service programs for high cost companies in rural areas, low-income consumers, rural health care providers, and schools and libraries. The universal service Schools and Libraries Program, commonly known as “E-rate,” provides discounts of up to 90 percent to help eligible schools and libraries in the United States obtain affordable telecommunications and internet access. Mobile phones in the classroom: teachers share their tips.

Jo Debens, geography teacher, Priory School, Portsmouth The geography department at my school has been leading the use of mobile device in learning.

Mobile phones in the classroom: teachers share their tips

Throughout last year the mobile@priory charter was created and led by head of department David Rogers and co-constructed by students to enable them to use mobile devices in learning. This was trialled through the geography department and found great success with students becoming more actively engaged with their learning. Some of the examples of where we use mobile devices range from simply taking photos and videos to share in class or recording homework, to creating revision podcasts or animations. The point often is student choice, encouraging independent learning and allowing students to choose what approach will suit them. 10 Innovative Schools Allowing Smartphones in the Classroom. Social Networking Fact Sheet. Highlights of the Pew Internet Project’s research related to social networking.

Social Networking Fact Sheet

(Note: This page will be updated whenever new data is available.) As of January 2014, 74% of online adults use social networking sites. As of September 2014: 71% of online adults use Facebook23% of online adults use Twitter26% use Instagram28% use Pinterest28% use LinkedIn For a detailed demographic portrait of users of various social networking sites from September 2014, please see our recent report, Social Media Update 2014. In May 2013, 74% of women were users of social networking sites, compared with 62% of men. Between February 2005 and August 2006, the use of social networking sites among young adult internet users ages 18-29 jumped from 9% to 49%. Mobile The growing ubiquity of cell phones, especially the rise of smartphones, has made social networking just a finger tap away.

Social impact Do social networking sites isolate people and truncate their relationships? Creators and curators As of August 2012: Children's Internet Protection Act. The Children's Internet Protection Act (CIPA) was enacted by Congress in 2000 to address concerns about children's access to obscene or harmful content over the Internet.

Children's Internet Protection Act

CIPA imposes certain requirements on schools or libraries that receive discounts for Internet access or internal connections through the E-rate program – a program that makes certain communications services and products more affordable for eligible schools and libraries. In early 2001, the FCC issued rules implementing CIPA and provided updates to those rules in 2011. What CIPA requires Schools and libraries subject to CIPA may not receive the discounts offered by the E-rate program unless they certify that they have an Internet safety policy that includes technology protection measures. The protection measures must block or filter Internet access to pictures that are: (a) obscene; (b) child pornography; or (c) harmful to minors (for computers that are accessed by minors).

Filing a complaint Accessible formats Print Out. Initial Blog Post. Cellphones in the Classroom: Distraction or Tool? The final version of the National Education Technology Plan (NETP) was released last week, setting forth the Obama Administration's plan for improving access to and integration of technologies for teaching and learning.

Cellphones in the Classroom: Distraction or Tool?

Among the recommendations the Department of Education makes in the NETP is a call for support for "efforts to ensure that all students and educators have 24/7 access to the Internet via devices, including mobile devices, and that states, districts, and schools adopt technologies and policies to enable leveraging the technology that students already have. " The push for "24/7 access to the Internet" falls under another the auspices of yet another endeavor, the National Broadband Plan. But the call for better access to Internet-ready devices, particularly utilizing tools the students already possess is an interesting one. Facebook Takes On Cyberbullies As More Teens Leave Site : All Tech Considered. Edutopia-parents-guide-21st-century-learning.pdf.