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Court decision harks to UC's Bakke case: New affirmative action ruling could have profound impacts, but not at UC. Title VI Of The Civil Rights Act Of 1964 42 U.S.C. § 2000d Et Seq. Overview of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 Title VI, 42 U.S.C. § 2000d et seq., was enacted as part of the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Title VI Of The Civil Rights Act Of 1964 42 U.S.C. § 2000d Et Seq.

It prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, and national origin in programs and activities receiving federal financial assistance. As President John F. Kennedy said in 1963: Object moved. June 2016 Current Case Fisher v.

Object moved

Texas. Supreme Court upholds affirmative action in university admissions. Regents of the University of California v. Bakke Was Wrongly Decided. I.

Regents of the University of California v. Bakke Was Wrongly Decided

Introduction Q: In 1868, when the 39th Congress was debating and ultimately proposing the 14th Amendment, I don’t think anybody would have thought that equal protection applied to sex discrimination, or certainly not to sexual orientation. Westlaw Signon. Welcome to LexisNexis - Choose Your Path. Oyez. The Supreme Court . Expanding Civil Rights . Landmark Cases . Regents of University of California v. Bakke (1978) In Regents of University of California v.

The Supreme Court . Expanding Civil Rights . Landmark Cases . Regents of University of California v. Bakke (1978)

Bakke (1978), the Court ruled unconstitutional a university's use of racial "quotas" in its admissions process, but held that affirmative action programs could be constitutional in some circumstances. Reproduction courtesy of the University of California Regents of University of California v. Bakke (1978) The Supreme Court, in a 5-4 decision written by Justice Lewis Franklin Powell, ruled that a state may constitutionally consider race as a factor in its university admissions to promote educational diversity, but only if considered alongside other factors and on a case-by-case basis.

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA REGENTS v. BAKKE. United States Supreme Court UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA REGENTS v.

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA REGENTS v. BAKKE

BAKKE, (1978) No. 76-811. Regents of the U. of California v. Bakke. " . . .

Regents of the U. of California v. Bakke

Race or ethnic background may be deemed a "plus" in a particular applicant's file, yet it does not insulate the individual from comparison with all other candidates for the available seats. " — Justice Powell, Speaking for the Court In the early 1970s, the medical school of the University of California at Davis devised a dual admissions program to increase representation of disadvantaged minority students.

Allan Bakke was a white male who applied to and was rejected from the regular admissions program, while minority applicants with lower grade point averages and testing scores were admitted under the specialty admissions program. Bakke filed suit, alleging that this admissions system violated the Equal Protection Clause and excluded him on the basis of race.