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Silhouette Blog. Michael Powell Art: Cross Stitch Kits, Tapestry, Greeting Cards. Rick Rack Rosettes. A friend gave me this flower ring and necklace, when she handed them to me I thought they were porcelain–there’s a very vintage feel to them.

Rick Rack Rosettes

From a distance you really can’t tell that they’re made out of rick rack! Yes, rick rack! She shared how to make them with me, and now I’m sharing with all of you readers! The wow of the rosette comes from a few simple steps! She found this tutorial, in Portuguese I believe. First, cut 2 strips of rick rack. Then twist the two pieces of rick rack together, like this. And then run a stitch down one side to hold it all together. Like so. And to make the flower, you just start from one end and roll it up. Keep rolling. Until you have this–and then tuck the little tail under and hot glue it down. You’ll notice all of the petals are closed, so to open them up you just peel them back one by one.

And here it is on my finger. Awesome. (Please excuse my hands, my hand model moved to Indiana, so I’m left using what I’ve got. Tutorial: Scrap Buster Fall Pillow. This is my favorite thing to do with my little scraps, and since its Scrap Buster month over at Sew, Mama, Sew, I made a quick tutorial so you can make your own.

Tutorial: Scrap Buster Fall Pillow

This pillow cover is 16" square with an envelope back & the design possibilities are endless! Simple Pop-Ups You Can Make! Beautiful Word Clouds. How to Make Leaf Skeletons. I wanted to share with you a project from one of my readers who shares with us how to make leaf skeletons.

How to Make Leaf Skeletons

I LOVE this! I have several leafs in various forms displayed in my home and knew I needed to make some of her leaf skeletons to add to my decor. I love how a pattern of leaves can enhance the beauty in your home. So I asked Heather if she would mind sharing her project with you. You can find more great projects from Heather at her blog The Other White House. I have spent hours and tried various ways of making these. You need washing soda, not baking soda! Gather your leaves. Washing soda is a strong base so you may want to wear gloves when handling the leaves. You will add 3/4 cup of washing soda and 4 cups of water to your pot of leaves. Keep going, you will need to add more water so your pan doesn’t dry out.

When 1.75 hours are up fill a glass baking dish with cool water. I carefully removed them and rinsed with water and added clean water to the pan. Karen ruane. FindInspirations.com - StumbleUpon. Japanese Kusudama, this tutorial is featured on Craftuts Anyone can do that, I assure you.

FindInspirations.com - StumbleUpon

The proof: I can, just take a quick look at my result below. And, believe me, I am neither meticulous nor particularly patient. &jones design company - StumbleUpon. Welcome to flower week – five days of simple and delightful flower projects.

&jones design company - StumbleUpon

I could probably do three weeks of flowers because there are so many different ways to create them, but I’ve limited it to five of my current favorites. Before we get started, let me make a few disclaimers: 1. I find inspiration for projects all over the place {online, in shops, in magazines}, then figure out how to re-create them on my own. Each of these projects are my adaptation of something I’ve seen elsewhere. 2. 3. Okay, so let’s begin. Here’s what you’ll need: :: paper {either cover or text weight} :: florist wire :: scissors, pencil, glue gun STEP ONE: cut irregular circle This circle is approximately 8 inches, but you can do any size you wish. STEP TWO: cut spiral Start at the outside edge and cut in a spiral fashion to the center. I like a sort of bumpy shape so that the petals end up a bit irregular If you aren’t so sure about your cutting skills, feel free to draw your spiral before cutting.

Folding Trees & Kusudama. The Japanese kusudama is a paper ball made out of multiple identical origami shapes glued together.

Folding Trees & Kusudama

They were traditionally used as a ball for incense or potpourri but now we see them more for decoration or as a gift.