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Jeff Hawkins on how brain science will change computing
Walking through doorways causes forgetting, new research shows Walking through doorways causes forgetting, new research shows Public release date: 18-Nov-2011 [ Print | E-mail Share ] [ Close Window ] Contact: Gabriel Radvansky gradvans@nd.edu 574-631-6473University of Notre Dame We've all experienced it: The frustration of entering a room and forgetting what we were going to do. Or get.
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Dual NBack Application
Critical & Creative Education

Notes & Neurons: In Search of the Common Chorus
Test Your Vocabulary How many words do you know? Check the box for each word you know at least one definition for. (Don't check boxes for words you know you've seen before, but whose meaning you aren't exactly sure of.) Tip: on Windows computers, you can navigate and select checkboxes with your keyboard using tab and space. Test Your Vocabulary
11 Goal Hacks: How to Achieve Anything Goal-setting research on fantasising, visualisation, goal commitment, procrastination, the dark side of goal-setting and more… We’re all familiar with the nuts and bolts of goal-setting. We should set specific, challenging goals, use rewards, record progress and make public commitments (if you’re not familiar with these then check out this article on how to reach life goals). So how come we still fail? This psychological research suggests why and what mindsets should help us reach our goals. 11 Goal Hacks: How to Achieve Anything
10 Common Misconceptions Dispelled
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@septentriones: Haha, what you're saying is actually quite indeed close to correct, though there is a bit more. We are a culmination of our experiences, but that doesn't mean that our minds cannot advance further than that, for all that is required is the idea of an experience, for example, I have never been sledding down a mountain. However, I can imagine a sled, imagine a mountain, and myself in motion, so I can build the idea of the experience. If you can transcend your own personal experiences and create new ones idly, your potential for knowledge is increased 10fold. How to Hack Your Brain How to Hack Your Brain
Much of the brain is still mysterious to modern science, possibly because modern science itself is using brains to analyze it. There are probably secrets the brain simply doesn't want us to know. But by no means should that stop us from tinkering around in there, using somewhat questionable and possibly dangerous techniques to make our brains do what we want. We can't vouch for any of these, either their effectiveness or safety. All we can say is that they sound awesome, since apparently you can make your brain... Think You Got a Good Night's Sleep (After Only Two Hours of Actual Sleep) 5 Ways To Hack Your Brain Into Awesomeness 5 Ways To Hack Your Brain Into Awesomeness
77 Brain Hacks to Learn Faster, Deeper, and Better Source: Online Education Database If someone granted you one wish, what do you imagine you would want out of life that you haven't gotten yet? For many people, it would be self-improvement and knowledge. New knowledge is the backbone of society's progress. Great thinkers such as Leonardo da Vinci, Thomas Edison, Benjamin Franklin, Albert Einstein, and others' quests for knowledge have led society to many of the marvels we enjoy today. 77 Brain Hacks to Learn Faster, Deeper, and Better
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Improve Your Memory by Speaking Your Mind’s Language Improve Your Memory by Speaking Your Mind’s Language By learning the language your mind uses, you’ll be able to tap into your mind’s full potential and develop a remarkable memory. It’s easier than you think – and you’ll actually have fun doing it. Your Mind Thinks in Pictures Along its evolution, the brain has become amazingly effective in dealing with sensory data. It is by correctly interpreting the five senses that the mind understands the environment and takes decisions.
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Critical Thinking By Example Critical Thinking By Example 1.1 Two Conventions for Standardizing To standardize an argument is to break it down into its components in a manner that shows the logical relationships between the parts. An argument, in our technical sense, is a reason or reasons offered in support of a conclusion. So, for anything to qualify as an argument it must have two components: at least one reason and one conclusion. Standardizing involves identifying these component parts.