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How Slavery Shaped America's Oldest And Most Elite Colleges : Code Switch. Hide captionAn early flier for an event at King's College —” which would later become Columbia University — included an advertisement for a slave auction.

How Slavery Shaped America's Oldest And Most Elite Colleges : Code Switch

John Minchillo/AP An early flier for an event at King's College —” which would later become Columbia University — included an advertisement for a slave auction. A few years ago, Brown University commissioned a study of its own historical connection to the Atlantic slave trade. Prison-Industrial Complex? Maybe It's Time For A Schools-Industrial Complex. California has built 23 prisons since 1980.

Prison-Industrial Complex? Maybe It's Time For A Schools-Industrial Complex

In the same period, the University of California system has opened one new campus. And although California's prison population has declined in recent years, the state's spending per prisoner has increased five times faster than its spending per K-12 student in the last two decades. California has more than 130,000 prisoners, a huge increase from the state's 1980 prison population of about 25,000. Prisons cost California taxpayers close to $10 billion, compared with $604 million in 1980. Low income college graduates excluded from elite institutions, upward mobility. Charts: Racial Polarization Increasing in Higher Education. College attendance rates for African-American and Latino students have been increasing steadily in recent years.

Charts: Racial Polarization Increasing in Higher Education

But here's the bad news that comes along with that: those students are mostly attending non-selective four-year colleges and community colleges, while whites are increasingly attending prestigious colleges and universities, the Washington Post reports. A study released Wednesday by the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce found that between 1995 and 2009, college enrollment more than doubled for Latinos and jumped 73 percent for African Americans, while only increasing 15 percent for whites.

During that period, 80 percent of white college freshman enrolled in the nation's top 468 colleges, while only 13 percent of Latinos and nine percent of African-Americans went to those selective four-year schools. The Best New Argument for Affirmative Action - Jordan Weissmann. White students are now more overrepresented at top U.S. colleges than in 1995.

The Best New Argument for Affirmative Action - Jordan Weissmann

Affirmative action fans, get ready to meet your new favorite talking point. America's top colleges have always been pretty pasty white places. But you might have been under the impression that, over time, their campuses were coming to look a bit more like the country has a whole, that they were at least making some measurable, collective progress on the diversity front. Not lately, it turns out. According to a surprising new report from the Georgetown Center on Education and the Workforce, white students are now more overrepresented at the most selective U.S. colleges than they were in 1995. Tea Party Groups In Tennessee Demand Textbooks Overlook U.S. Founder's Slave-Owning History. A little more than a year after the conservative-led state board of education in Texas approved massive changes to its school textbooks to put slavery in a more positive light, a group of Tea Party activists in Tennessee has renewed its push to whitewash school textbooks.

Tea Party Groups In Tennessee Demand Textbooks Overlook U.S. Founder's Slave-Owning History

The group is seeking to remove references to slavery and mentions of the country's founders being slave owners. For poor children, metro Atlanta holds lousy odds of success. Few long-time education watchers in Georgia will be surprised that children from poor families stand a better chance of attaining middle-class status in Seattle than metro Atlanta.

For poor children, metro Atlanta holds lousy odds of success

Despite all the rhetoric, the state continues to downplay the importance of shoring up an education system that has never been first-rate. And it doesn't look like that is about to change any time soon. As today's MyAJC.com reports: Grappling with steep budget cuts, school districts throughout Georgia are slashing days --- and in some cases full weeks --- from their school calendars to keep costs down. A handful of small, rural districts in the state have even taken the extreme step of shortening the school week to four days.The shift to fewer days runs counter to calls from a growing number of academic and policy experts to move in the opposite direction.

The study stated: In particular, areas with a smaller middle class had lower rates of upward mobility. As The New York Times reported: Unequal Classrooms: What Online Education Cannot Teach - The Conversation. Mom Sentenced to Jail For Seeking a Better Education For Her Children. Thenation : INFOGRAPHIC: It's not just... Beauty School Students Left With Broken Promises and Large Debts. The cost of child poverty: $500 billion a year. The United States has the second-highest child poverty rate among the world’s richest 35 nations, and the cost in economic and educational outcomes is half a trillion dollars a year, according to a new report by the Educational Testing Service.

The cost of child poverty: $500 billion a year

The report, called “Poverty and Education, Finding the Way Forward,” says that 22 percent of the nation’s children live in relative poverty, with only Romania having a higher rate in the group of 35 nations. (Next are Latvia, Bulgaria, Spain, Greece, Italy, Lithuania, Japan and Portugal, it says; the country with the lowest child poverty rate is Iceland, and the second lowest is Finland.) The report notes, though, that the official U.S. poverty rate is incomplete, and that other data show that 48 percent of the population had incomes in 2011 that are considered inadequate or not livable. (Relative poverty rates refer to people with incomes below 50 percent of the poverty threshold.) The report was written by Richard J. American Dinosaurs: What's the Matter With Health Care and Education? - Marc Tucker.

Welcome to America's biggest long-term challenge: Our medical and education industries are a two-headed hydra of economic inefficiency, over-eating our resources and under-serving our needy Reuters The problems with our nation's health care system are of course very different from the challenges facing our national education system.

American Dinosaurs: What's the Matter With Health Care and Education? - Marc Tucker

But when you look under the hood, you could make a strong argument that the problems are actually very much the same. Consider the structure of American health care over the past few decades. One can think of it as serving four levels of clients: those with no insurance, those with Medicare or Medicaid, those with employer-provided insurance, and those wealthy enough to pay for all their health care services in cash, including concierge services.

Most of those who were uninsured went without any health care services much of the time. Now consider our public education system. Yet funding for our public education system works differently. How America's 2-Tiered Education System Is Perpetuating Inequality - Emily Chertoff. President Obama, with Eduardo Padrón (left), receives an honorary Associates of Science degree from Miami-Dade College in 2011.

How America's 2-Tiered Education System Is Perpetuating Inequality - Emily Chertoff

(Larry Downing/Reuters) In 2006, Amherst College made a decision that administrators at some other schools considered radical. The critics said it would dent the value of the school's degree, or force it to "lower its standards. " Why Isn't Better Education Giving Women More Power? - Garance Franke-Ruta. Walter Newton In her new book, Lean In, Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s chief operating officer, recounts a warning she delivered to Harvard Business School students in 2011.

Why Isn't Better Education Giving Women More Power? - Garance Franke-Ruta

“About one-third of the women in this audience will be working full-time” in 15 years, she told them. “And almost all of you will be working for the guy you are sitting next to.” Surveying the stubborn gender inequalities of the early-21st-century workplace, Sandberg has written what might best be described as a cross between a feminist treatise and an airport business book, in which she advocates for structural changes to make corporate America more hospitable to women—particularly mothers. Summer learning loss: Summer vacation hurts kids in school and is especially bad for the poor. Photo by Christian J.

U.S. Higher-Education System Perpetuates White Privilege, Report Says - Students. By Casey McDermott Colleges and universities have succeeded in attracting more underrepresented-minority students, but that increased access for black and Hispanic students has been accompanied by increasing campus polarization on the basis of race and ethnicity, says a report released on Wednesday by Georgetown University's Center on Education and the Workforce. The result, it says, is a system in which elite selective colleges enroll predominantly white students while black and Hispanic students, even high-achieving ones, largely attend open-access institutions. Because the latter group of colleges spends less on instruction and sees lower shares of students through to graduation, higher education has thus become a "passive agent" in perpetuating white privilege, says the report, "Separate and Unequal: How Higher Education Reinforces the Intergenerational Reproduction of White Racial Privilege.

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