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Crazy mom quilts: one way to label a quilt. I would venture to guess that not many people can say that labeling their quilt is their favorite part of the quilting process.

crazy mom quilts: one way to label a quilt

Open Line Friday-The BEST Charity Raffle Quilts. Good Morning, Quilters and Quilt-Lovers!

Open Line Friday-The BEST Charity Raffle Quilts

Welcome back to Open Line Fridays! –Everyone asks and Everyone answers… We’ve got more than 5000 experienced quilters out there and someone will be able to answer YOUR question! This week, we have a question from sister, Pat…(she’s not just a sewing-sister, she’s one of my REAL sisters!) Here’s Pat’s question: “I would love to get advice about making a raffle quilt—everything from what brings the most interest(and $) related to size, design and color.

QUILTS

Yarn. Reference-Sewing. Sewing - Garments. Sewing - Other. Colorways. Color schemes. Color Hunter. Design & Inspiration. CRAFTY STORAGE. How I organize my fabric stash + free downloadable stash tags!   Sarai Mitnick Founder Sarai started Colette back in 2009.

How I organize my fabric stash + free downloadable stash tags!  

She believes the primary role of a business should be to help people. She loves good books, sewing with wool, her charming cats, working in her garden, and eating salsa. All posts by Sarai More about our writers You’ve seen how I organize my enormous stash of patterns. I will admit, my stash is bigger than I’d like it to be. I could conceivably use the same method I use for patterns with my fabric, but I don’t think it would be ideal. Fabric isn’t as resuable. My old method Years ago, some of you might recall the method I came up with for storing it in boxes and attaching swatches to the outside.

This worked fairly well, but it wasn’t perfect. It was also hard to flip through all my swatches, because they were attached to the boxes where the fabric was stored. I needed some tweaks. My new swatch system I decided to keep the swatches in one place so that I could look through them all at once. Make your own swatch tags. Utility Quilts. It’s not the most elegant term, but when a quilt is made to be used — on a bed or a couch, in a crib, or as a picnic blanket — utility is what’s happening (although it’s nice if there’s some pretty going on, too!).

Utility Quilts

I love having a lot of hand-made quilts in my home, and when there’s a major-deal birthday or wedding in the family, a quilt is such a great way to say “Congratulations” and “I love you.” Domestic Bliss 2015 72″x72″ On reserve for an upcoming gift occasion, so hasn’t been blogged yet. Summer Garden This quilt was featured in the Aug., 2014 issue of The Quilt Life magazine (from which I grabbed this photo, because the ones I took have disappeared. 2014 56″x72″ Sun Shower This is a monochrome, baby quilt size of “Summer Garden” (above).

World Traveler The largest quilt I’ve made yet, for us. 2013 96″x96″ Details on the blog, here. Kaleidoscope Pop. Quilting in the Last Years of the Great Depression (18 Photos) - Old Photo Archive - Vintage Photos and Historical Photos. During the Great Depression, sewing materials were conserved for clothing and repair; however, toward the end of the Depression, quilters brought out their tools and un-used squares and got to work.

Quilting in the Last Years of the Great Depression (18 Photos) - Old Photo Archive - Vintage Photos and Historical Photos

Quilting has always been used to pass on family stories and memories, but it also has a long tradition of being tied to acts of kindness and charity. After years of tattered clothing and poverty, those still down on their luck got great happiness and comfort out of receiving a new quilt. We wanted to share a few photos of quilters at work from 1936-1941. Yamhill County, Oregon Farm women of the "Helping Hand" club display a pieced quilt which they are making for the benefit of one of their numbers.

Farm women, members of the "Helping Hand" club, carefully roll up the quilt upon which they are working. Kern County, California Grandmother from Oklahoma and her pieced quilt. World Quilts: The American Story. Quiltmaking in the United States may have started out as a high-style craft, but by the 20th century Americans associated quilts with utility and thrift, perhaps due in part to Colonial Revivalists’ promotion of these qualities in their early 20th-century writings about quilts.

World Quilts: The American Story

Some quiltmakers indeed did made quilts with utility and thrift at the forefront of their minds, particularly in the midst of the Great Depression. Many of the fancy quilts preserved at the IQSC&M show very little wear, suggesting they are not necessarily utilitarian objects. Others clearly received everyday use, and may have been made from more utilitarian fabrics, like the suiting samples Cora James used to stitch the “kitchen quilt” shown in the image carousel. Other quilts are harder to decipher, because they may have been made with thrift in mind, but perhaps not utility. Utilityquilts.com Review - Stat Analysis Report.


  1. amcc_belgique Nov 15 2011
    do you speek french? valerie.felder@gmail.com i would you like to present this pearl in my website ...