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English in Early Childhood

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Information sheet Guidelines for documenting children s learning. Useful comments and conversations. LearnEnglish Kids - British Council. Pre-birth to Three: Observation, Assessment and Planning. Observation, Assessment and Planning - Early Years Matters. The EYFS Profile summarises and describes children’s attainment at the end of the EYFS.

Observation, Assessment and Planning - Early Years Matters

It is based on on-going observation and assessment in the three prime and four specific areas of learning, and the three learning characteristics, set out below: The prime areas of learning: • communication and language • physical development. One theory all teachers with disruptive children should know about. Imagine a classroom where children are unable to wait their turn or stay focused on their work.

One theory all teachers with disruptive children should know about

They are easily distracted, cannot remember basic instructions or hold enough information in their head to solve problems – skills teachers rely on in order to teach successfully. These behavioural issues are all examples of problems that can arise from attachment issues – based on the relationship between children and their main caregiver. Attachment theory is now one of the world’s most well-researched theories about human development. Which Early Childhood Experiences Shape Adult Life? By Maanvi Singh, NPR Most of us don’t remember our first two or three years of life — but our earliest experiences may stick with us for years and continue to influence us well into adulthood.

Which Early Childhood Experiences Shape Adult Life?

Just how they influence us and how much is a question that researchers are still trying to answer. Why Empathy Holds the Key to Transforming 21st Century Learning. By Thom Markham Like other aspects of modern life, education can make the head hurt.

Why Empathy Holds the Key to Transforming 21st Century Learning

So many outcomes, so much important work to do, so many solutions and strategies, so many variations on teaching, so many different kinds of students with so many different needs, so many unknowns in preparing for 21st Century life and the endless list of jobs that haven’t been invented. What if we discovered one unifying factor that brought all of this confusion under one roof and gave us a coherent sense of how to stimulate the intellect, teach children to engage in collaborative problem solving and creative challenge, and foster social-emotional balance and stability—one factor that, if we got right, would change the equation for learning in the same way that confirming the existence of a fundamental particle informs a grand theory of the universe?

Providing resources and opportunities. Enabling environments. Patricia Kuhl: The linguistic genius of babies. The role of a key person. Carol Dweck: The power of believing that you can improve. What to consider when teaching English in large classes. How many students do you teach?

What to consider when teaching English in large classes

Do you feel that your classes are too big? Author and education consultant Jason Anderson looks at the issues and offers some potential solutions. For many of us, our classes are larger than we would like them to be. They can present a number of challenges that teachers of smaller classes are less likely to face. But what exactly do we mean by large classes? Definitions of a large class What we label a ‘large class’ depends mostly on context and expectations. In this article, we will take the midpoint between these two figures. Where teachers work in large classes today Perhaps the two continents where teachers most commonly work in large classes are Africa (especially sub-Saharan Africa) and Asia (especially the Indian sub-continent and China). This is not a uniform picture. Large classes are not unique to low-income countries. The challenges of working in large classes We can divide the challenges into two general areas: 1. 2. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 1. 2.

Whole Child Development Is Undervalued. Child development should inspire lifelong learning across different spaces and communities.

Whole Child Development Is Undervalued

Research suggests that "whole child development," not routine or standardized classroom-based learning, empowers children as creative and engaged citizens who can strengthen the wellbeing of a whole society. It is crucial, then, to nurture their creative abilities to express themselves, understand others, and navigate complex amounts of information so that they can confidently solve the problems of a world that's changing faster than ever.

The question is how to make such an approach both systemic and sustainable. Whole Person Socio-emotional, physical, creative, and cognitive capacities are deeply intertwined and equally important in ensuring a child's wellbeing, learning, and growth. Nobel laureate James Heckman, a professor of economics at the University of Chicago, has shown that the non-cognitive skills emerging in early childhood are among the strongest predictors of adult outcomes. Definitions. Ey making mark matters76708 1. How to teach children English using illustrated storybooks. What makes illustrated storybooks such a good resource for teaching young learners of English?

How to teach children English using illustrated storybooks

The British Council’s Gail Ellis, co-author of a storytelling handbook for primary English language teachers, explains. Listen to an interview with Gail in our podcast and register for her webinar taking place on Thursday, 2 October. Illustrated storybooks provide an ideal resource for helping children learn English. This is because children love listening to stories. Storybooks present language in familiar and memorable contexts, and high quality illustrations help children understand as they match what they hear to what they see.

Why use storybooks in the classroom? Teachers can use storybooks to complement an English language course or as the main teaching resource. Storybooks can meet a variety of learner needs Selecting the right storybook The key to successful storytelling is having the right story for the linguistic and cognitive ability of the children. Ten ways to support your child’s English-learning at home. As the British Council opens a new Learning Time with Shaun & Timmy centre in Mexico for two- to six-year-olds, senior teacher Sarah Reid offers some useful tips for supporting your child’s learning at home. More and more parents want their children to learn English from a young age. I often meet parents of children as young as two or three who say that proficiency in speaking English will help their child 'get ahead in a globalised world'.

In other words, the sooner their children get started, the better. The single most important factor in a child’s success with English is their parents' interest and encouragement, no matter what their child’s age. So what can parents do at home to support their learning? 1. To build a positive attitude towards learning, and towards English as a language, the best place to start is with yourself. How young children learn English as another language. By Opal Dunn, educational consultant and author Introduction Young children are natural language acquirers; they are self-motivated to pick up language without conscious learning, unlike adolescents and adults.

How young children learn English as another language

A few more myths about speakers of multiple languages. Does multilingualism cause language delays and identity problems?

A few more myths about speakers of multiple languages

The British Council's Nayr Ibrahim busts a few more myths about speakers of multiple languages. Myth: Multilingualism causes language delay Raising children bilingually is sometimes believed to cause language delay. This misconception is based on a separate underlying proficiency (SUP) hypothesis. This theory, now discredited, suggests that languages are stored in separate compartments or containers, which represent half the capacity of the monolingual brain.