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Manifesto of the Communist Party. Revolutionary France. The French Revolution. The Holy Family by Marx and Engels. The Holy Family Chapter VI 3) d) Critical Battle Against French Materialism.

The Holy Family by Marx and Engels

Global Social Change. The open source revolution is coming and it will conquer the 1% - ex CIA spy. Robert David Steele, former Marine, CIA case officer, and US co-founder of the US Marine Corps intelligence activity, is a man on a mission.

The open source revolution is coming and it will conquer the 1% - ex CIA spy

But it's a mission that frightens the US intelligence establishment to its core.With 18 years experience working across the US intelligence community, followed by 20 more years in commercial intelligence and training, Steele's exemplary career has spanned almost all areas of both the clandestine world. Steele started off as a Marine Corps infantry and intelligence officer. After four years on active duty, he joined the CIA for about a decade before co-founding the Marine Corps Intelligence Activity, where he was deputy director.

Masters Of Money 3_3 - Karl Marx BBC Documentary Series) - YouTube. Mahatma Gandhi. Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (pronounced [ˈmoːɦənd̪aːs ˈkərəmtʃənd̪ ˈɡaːnd̪ʱi] ( ); 2 October 1869 – 30 January 1948) was the preeminent leader of Indian nationalism in British-ruled India.

Mahatma Gandhi

Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahatma (Sanskrit: "high-souled", "venerable"[2])—applied to him first in 1914 in South Africa,[3]—is now used worldwide. He is also called Bapu (Gujarati: endearment for "father",[4] "papa"[4][5]) in India.

Aboriginal Tent Embassy. The Aboriginal Tent Embassy is a controversial semi-permanent assemblage claiming to represent the political rights of Aboriginal Australians.

Aboriginal Tent Embassy

It is made up of a group of activists, signs and tents that reside on the lawn of Old Parliament House in Canberra, the Australian capital. It is not considered an official embassy by the Australian Government. History[edit] A Brief Histry of AIM. - American Indian Movement - AIM - American Indian Movement.

Flag of the American Indian Movement The American Indian Movement (AIM) is a Native American advocacy group in the United States, founded in 1968 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, with an agenda that focuses on spirituality, leadership, and sovereignty.

American Indian Movement

The founders included Dennis Banks, George Mitchell, Herb Powless, Clyde Bellecourt, Harold Goodsky, Eddie Benton-Banai, and a number of others in the Minneapolis Native American community.[1] Russell Means, born Oglala Lakota, was an early leader in 1970s protests. In October 1972, AIM gathered members from across the country to a protest in Washington, D.C. known as the "Trail of Broken Treaties". AIM gained national attention when it seized the Bureau of Indian Affairs national headquarters and presented a 20-point list of demands to the federal government. In 1973, it led a 71-day armed standoff with federal forces at Wounded Knee, South Dakota, on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.

Background[edit] 1960s[edit] Presidents John F. Events[edit] Idle No More. Background[edit] After the May 2, 2011 Canadian Federal election, the federal government led by Stephen Harper proposed a number of omnibus bills introducing numerous legislative changes.

Idle No More

Idle No More. Idle No More. Movements for civil rights. Movements for civil rights were a worldwide series of political movements for equality before the law that peaked in the 1960s.

Movements for civil rights

In many situations it took the form of campaigns of civil resistance aimed at achieving change through nonviolent forms of resistance. In some situations it was accompanied, or followed, by civil unrest and armed rebellion. African-American Civil Rights Movement (1954–68) The African-American Civil Rights Movement or 1960s Civil Rights Movement encompasses social movements in the United States whose goals were to end racial segregation and discrimination against black Americans and to secure legal recognition and federal protection of the citizenship rights enumerated in the Constitution and federal law.

African-American Civil Rights Movement (1954–68)

This article covers the phase of the movement between 1954 and 1968, particularly in the South. A wave of inner city riots in black communities from 1964 through 1970 undercut support from the white community. Civil Rights Movement - Black History. Severe government repression, the assassinations of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, and the intense infighting within the black militant community caused a decline in protest activity after the 1960s.

Civil Rights Movement - Black History

The African-American freedom struggle nevertheless left a permanent mark on American society. Overt forms of racial discrimination and government-supported segregation of public facilities came to an end, although de facto, as opposed to de jure, segregation persisted in northern as well as southern public school systems and in other areas of American society. In the South, antiblack violence declined. Black candidates were elected to political offices in communities where blacks had once been barred from voting, and many of the leaders or organizations that came into existence during the 1950s and 1960s remained active in southern politics. Southern colleges and universities that once excluded blacks began to recruit them. The Zapatistas’ legacy of rebellion. Magdalena García Durán is an indigenous Mazahua woman from San Antonio Pueblo Nuevo in central Mexico.

The Zapatistas’ legacy of rebellion

Commenting in the run-up to 20th anniversary of the Zapatista uprising in the distant southern state of Chiapas, she tells an interviewer: “Living as an indigenous woman in a big city is not easy. I had to wear different clothes, dye my hair and wear high heels to go to meetings at my son’s school. Struggling on: Zapatistas 20 years after the uprising. 1 January 2014Last updated at 00:37 ET By Will Grant BBC Mundo, San Cristobal de las Casas Continue reading the main story. Zapatista Army of National Liberation. The Zapatista Army of National Liberation (Ejército Zapatista de Liberación Nacional, EZLN), often referred to as the Zapatistas, is a revolutionary leftist group based in Chiapas, the southernmost state of Mexico. Since 1994, the group has been in a declared war "against the Mexican state", although this war has been primarily defensive, against military, paramilitary and corporate incursions into Chiapas.

[citation needed] In recent years, it has been focused on a strategy of civil resistance. The Zapatistas' physical base is made up of mostly rural indigenous people but includes some supporters in urban areas and internationally. Their main spokesperson is Subcomandante Marcos (currently a.k.a. 1999 Seattle WTO protests. Organizations and planning[edit] Planning for the demonstrations began months in advance and included local, national, and international organizations. Among the most notable participants were national and international NGOs (especially those concerned with labor issues, the environment, and consumer protection), labor unions (including the AFL-CIO), student groups, religiously-based groups (Jubilee 2000), and anarchists (some of whom formed a black bloc).[2] The coalition was loose, with some opponent groups focused on opposition to WTO policies (especially those related to free trade), with others motivated by pro-labor, anti-capitalist, or environmental agendas.

Global Revolutionary Alliance Manifesto. New Resistance is proud to be part of the Global Revolutionary Alliance. Please take the time to read and study the GRA Manifesto if you’d like to learn more about our international strategy.

Theory

Social Movements Videos. Technology. Unrest, protests & revolitions. New society.