Lucid dreaming

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Lucid Dreaming. Lucid Dreaming/Induction Techniques. This page describes a number of lucid dream induction techniques.

Lucid Dreaming/Induction Techniques

It is recommended that you be able to recall at least one dream per night in order to maximize the effectiveness of these methods. Preliminary Knowledge[edit] Certain elements are common to many of the lucidity-inducing techniques discussed later in this chapter. To better understand these techniques, these common components will be discussed first.

Sleep Interruption[edit] An element shared by many of the techniques is sleep interruption. Sleep interruption is a natural part of the MILD technique (described below) which trains you to arise immediately after your dreams end. Sleep Continuity[edit] If you have trouble initially falling asleep, avoid drinking water for about an hour before going to bed. If you still have difficulty getting to sleep, try reading about lucid dreaming just before going to sleep. Reality checks[edit] A reality check is a test you can perform to see if you're dreaming or awake. Techniques[edit] LUCID DREAMING. How to Lucid Dream. Edit Article Modified Look at Hand Method Edited by Sondra C, Choicefresh, Jack Herrick, Krystle and 361 others Lucid dreaming is awareness of the fact that you are dreaming.

How to Lucid Dream

This awareness can range from very faint recognition of the fact to something as momentous as a broadening of awareness beyond what has ever been experienced even in waking life. Lucid dreams usually occur while a person is in the middle of a regular dream and suddenly realizes that they are dreaming. Ad Steps 1During the day, repeatedly ask "Am I dreaming? " 11Look through previous dreams in your Dream Journal. Modified Look at Hand Method A Modified Version of Gritz's "Looking At Your Hands" 5With consistent practice of this phrase each night before sleep, you will suddenly see your hands pop up in front of you when dreaming, and consciously realize, "My hands! " Tips When you are aware you are dreaming, make sure you know it is a dream at all times. Warnings Sources and Citations Article Info.

Stephen LaBerge. Stephen LaBerge (born 1947) is a psychophysiologist and a leader in the scientific study of lucid dreaming.

Stephen LaBerge

In 1967 he received his Bachelor's Degree in mathematics. He began researching lucid dreaming for his Ph.D. in Psychophysiology at Stanford University, which he received in 1980.[1] He developed techniques to enable himself and other researchers to enter a lucid dream state at will, most notably the MILD technique (mnemonic induction of lucid dreams), which was necessary for many forms of dream experimentation.[2] In 1987, he founded The Lucidity Institute, an organization that promotes research into lucid dreaming, as well as running courses for the general public on how to achieve a lucid dream.[3] His technique of signalling to a collaborator monitoring his EEG with agreed-upon eye movements during REM became the first published, scientifically verified signal from a dreamer's mind to the outside world.

Research results[edit] Results from LaBerge's lab and others[5] include: